Skip to main content

Week 5 Fantasy Football Rankings From the Most Accurate Experts

Oct 10, 2020

Here’s a look at fantasy football rankings from our most accurate experts of the 2020 season. These rankings are for half-PPR scoring fantasy football formats.

Import your team to My Playbook for instant Lineup advice >>

Week 5 Quarterback Rankings

Rank Quarterbacks Team Opp Best Worst Avg Std Dev Proj. Pts
1 Russell Wilson SEA vs. MIN 1 3 1.3 0.5 24.9
2 Patrick Mahomes II KC vs. LV 1 4 2.1 0.5 24.3
3 Lamar Jackson BAL vs. CIN 1 7 3.2 1 23.7
4 Dak Prescott DAL vs. NYG 1 5 3.6 0.6 23
5 Josh Allen BUF at TEN 3 8 5.1 0.6 22.4
6 Kyler Murray ARI at NYJ 5 7 5.9 0.5 21.4
7 Deshaun Watson HOU vs. JAC 5 7 6.7 0.6 20.5
8 Matt Ryan ATL vs. CAR 7 15 8.3 0.8 19.8
9 Gardner Minshew II JAC at HOU 8 17 9.6 1.1 19.1
10 Teddy Bridgewater CAR at ATL 9 13 10.2 0.8 18.5
11 Drew Brees NO vs. LAC 8 16 11.1 1.7 18.2
12 Kirk Cousins MIN at SEA 8 22 13.4 1.7 18
13 Ben Roethlisberger PIT vs. PHI 9 18 13.7 2 17.7
14 Jared Goff LAR at WAS 11 19 13.9 1.7 17.4
15 Daniel Jones NYG at DAL 11 25 14.6 1.7 17.2
16 Joe Burrow CIN at BAL 11 20 15.1 1.7 16.9
17 Tom Brady TB at CHI 12 20 16.5 1.1 16.6
18 Justin Herbert LAC at NO 9 20 16.9 2.2 16.5
19 Ryan Fitzpatrick MIA at SF 17 21 19.8 1 16.4
20 Carson Wentz PHI at PIT 19 25 21.1 1.6 16.2

 
Kirk Cousins (MIN)
We’ve known Cousins to be a game manager type quarterback through much of his career, but that’s not the case to this point in 2020. His average depth of target is 11.0 yards, which ranks as the highest mark among quarterbacks who’ve started multiple games. The Seahawks defense has already faced a massive 200 pass attempts through four games this season. Lack of plays have been an issue for the Vikings as they’ve ran a league-low 55.8 offensive plays per game, but that shouldn’t be an issue against the Seahawks, who’ve allowed their opponents a league-leading 73.8 plays per game. You can now see how they’ve faced 50.0 pass attempts per game. No quarterback has walked out of a game against them with less than 44 pass attempts, and none of them have averaged less than 7.0 yards per attempt. The Seahawks aren’t getting pressure on the quarterback, as they rank as the third-worst in the league in pressure rate and sack rate. This will be good for Cousins, who has been pressured on 41.4 percent of his dropbacks this year, the most in the league. Oddly enough, the Seahawks have allowed just the eighth-fewest fantasy points per actual pass attempt, which is due to the minuscule 3.0 percent touchdown-rate, which could fluctuate. Still, Cousins should be able to deliver at least high-end QB2 numbers in this game and be a rock-solid streamer.

Daniel Jones (NYG)
Remember when we talked about touchdown regression for Patrick Mahomes after the 2018 season? Well, he threw a touchdown on 8.62 percent of his passes that year. Through four games, the Cowboys are allowing an 8.03 percent touchdown rate through the air. For each time a quarterback throws a pass (not including rushing totals), they average 0.614 fantasy points per pass attempt against the Cowboys. So, even if a quarterback has thrown just 30 passes, that averages out to 18.42 fantasy points. Crazy, right? The Giants have run just 60.2 plays per game to this point, though the Cowboys should be able to help out with that, as their opponents have run 71.8 plays per game, while their games overall have run a league-leading 149.0 plays per game. Matchups like this are the ones that had fantasy managers believing Jones could be a breakout star, as he totaled 28-plus fantasy points in games against Washington, the Bucs, Jets, and Lions last year, all teams who ranked in the bottom-15 against the pass, with three of them in the bottom-10. Knowing he’s still without one of his starting wide receivers, it’s tough to say Jones is a can’t-miss play this week, but if there ever were a week to play him, this would be it, as the Cowboys have allowed at least 38 points to each of their last three opponents.

Week 5 Running Back Rankings

Rank Running Backs Team Opp Best Worst Avg Std Dev Proj. Pts
1 Alvin Kamara NO vs. LAC 1 3 1.2 0.4 22.3
2 Ezekiel Elliott DAL vs. NYG 1 5 2.1 0.7 19.6
3 Dalvin Cook MIN at SEA 1 5 3.3 0.6 17.3
4 Clyde Edwards-Helaire KC vs. LV 2 7 3.6 1 16.9
5 Josh Jacobs LV at KC 4 10 6.1 1.2 16.7
6 Kareem Hunt CLE vs. IND 4 10 6.9 1.4 16.1
7 James Robinson JAC at HOU 6 11 7.8 0.8 15.8
8 Chris Carson SEA vs. MIN 4 12 8.3 1.8 15.7
9 Derrick Henry TEN vs. BUF 3 23 8.5 4.3 15.6
10 Jonathan Taylor IND at CLE 5 15 9.7 2 15.6
11 Mike Davis CAR at ATL 7 14 9.9 1.2 15.5
12 Joe Mixon CIN at BAL 10 16 12.9 1.3 15.2
13 James Conner PIT vs. PHI 9 21 14.4 2.9 15
14 David Johnson HOU vs. JAC 12 23 14.9 1.7 14.7
15 Miles Sanders PHI at PIT 11 19 15.8 1.8 14.3
16 Todd Gurley II ATL vs. CAR 12 20 16.2 2.2 14.2
17 Kenyan Drake ARI at NYJ 10 22 17.3 3.2 14.1
18 Devin Singletary BUF at TEN 10 25 17.5 2.6 14
19 Ronald Jones II TB at CHI 12 28 17.8 3.4 13.8
20 Melvin Gordon III DEN at NE 16 22 18.6 1.7 13.6
21 Jerick McKinnon SF vs. MIA 16 29 20.7 3.5 13.1
22 Antonio Gibson WAS vs. LAR 12 24 21.6 1.3 11.6
23 David Montgomery CHI vs. TB 18 25 22.9 1.4 11.2
24 Joshua Kelley LAC at NO 20 33 24.8 1.8 11.1
25 Mark Ingram II BAL vs. CIN 19 31 25.7 2.4 10.1
26 Darrell Henderson LAR at WAS 22 35 26.6 1.6 9.7
27 Myles Gaskin MIA at SF 23 31 26.7 1.5 9.5
28 Devonta Freeman NYG at DAL 24 35 29.3 2.8 9.4
29 Malcolm Brown LAR at WAS 28 48 30.9 2 9.3
30 Latavius Murray NO vs. LAC 27 40 30.9 2.3 9
31 James White NE vs. DEN 29 36 31.7 1.9 8.4
32 Damien Harris NE vs. DEN 25 41 32.6 3.9 8.2
33 Chase Edmonds ARI at NYJ 29 41 34.3 2.5 8.1
34 J.K. Dobbins BAL vs. CIN 30 40 34.3 2.3 8
35 Rex Burkhead NE vs. DEN 31 41 35.4 2.3 7.9
36 Nyheim Hines IND at CLE 33 43 36 2.3 7.9
37 Alexander Mattison MIN at SEA 36 49 40.4 3.5 7.3
38 Justin Jackson LAC at NO 31 60 42.2 8.3 7.3
39 Jeff Wilson Jr. SF vs. MIA 37 58 42.8 6.1 6.8
40 Gus Edwards BAL vs. CIN 36 49 43.1 2.6 6.7
41 Duke Johnson Jr. HOU vs. JAC 39 52 43.2 2.8 6.6
42 Frank Gore NYJ vs. ARI 37 59 43.3 4.5 6.1
43 Brian Hill ATL vs. CAR 40 51 43.4 1.9 6
44 D’Ernest Johnson CLE vs. IND 37 54 45.1 4.9 5.9
45 J.D. McKissic WAS vs. LAR 42 54 45.9 2 5.9
46 Ke’Shawn Vaughn TB at CHI 39 56 46.6 5.2 5.9
47 Le’Veon Bell NYJ vs. ARI 21 99 42.6 21.1 5.6
48 Jordan Howard MIA at SF 41 71 50.6 7.5 5.5
49 Boston Scott PHI at PIT 44 65 52.3 5.9 5.3
50 Chris Thompson JAC at HOU 48 59 52.6 3.1 4.9

 
James Robinson (JAC)
He’s now totaled 74 of the 88 running back touches available in this backfield, including four of the five targets available last week. That’s rare air and something we don’t see anymore. The only running back who’s averaged more yards per route run than Robinson on the season is Alvin Kamara. I mentioned a few weeks ago that there’s no difference between him and 2019 Leonard Fournette, a running back we were starting as a borderline RB1 most weeks. The Texans are a team you want to start running backs against. They’ve now allowed four straight running backs to score at least 15.7 PPR points against them, including 295 total yards and three touchdowns to the combination of James Conner and Dalvin Cook the last two weeks. The only starting running back who failed to rush for 100-plus yards against them was Mark Ingram, who carried the ball just nine times but for 55 yards and a touchdown. Teams have chosen to run the ball 55 percent of the time against the Texans, which is the highest percentage in the league. While I don’t expect the Jaguars to hit that number, Robinson is gamescript-proof workhorse who’s going against a bottom-five defense against running backs. He should be in lineups as a low-end RB1 this week.

Kenyan Drake (ARI)
Based on where he’s been contacted at/near the line of scrimmage and how many stacked boxes he’s seen, Drake has averaged 0.58 fewer yards per carry than he should’ve, according to NFL’s NextGenStats. Play-calling has certainly been an issue, but so has his play. It’s to the point where you wonder if that injury that had him in a walking boot during training camp is lingering, as he’s just not the same running back as he was last year when he averaged 0.22 more yards per carry than he was expected. He’s also received 72 percent of the team’s running back touches, so the process was good, but the play has not been. Whatever the case, this timeshare could start to move back towards a 50/50 split, though I’m still expecting Drake to lead the team in touches. The Jets have allowed a healthy 4.57 yards per carry on the season, though removing one run from Raheem Mostert knocks them down to 3.77 yards per carry on the year. The reason fantasy running backs have so much appeal against them is due to volume, as they’ve faced 31.0 running back touches per week, which is volume that even with less-than-stellar efficiency offers results. They’ve now allowed seven different running backs to finish as the RB31 or better, though just one of them finished higher than the RB16. Drake is still the recommended play, but the expectations need to be lowered into low-end RB2/high-end RB3 territory. Edmonds is receiving most of the work through the air, though teams haven’t felt it necessary to target running backs a whole lot against the Jets, as just two running backs have recorded more than three receptions. Edmonds is gaining steam but should be considered a mediocre flex option who comes with risk.

Darrell Henderson (LAR)
What a disappointment it was in Week 4 as Henderson had everything trending in the right direction, but then wound up receiving just nine opportunities against the Giants. Granted, he didn’t do much with those touches (38 total yards) but that’s hardly a big enough sample size to judge. It appears Sean McVay was being 100 percent honest when he said that he wanted his offense to be like Kyle Shanahan’s offense, with a different running back every week. Despite the stars aligning for Henderson last week, we were all let down, so remember that when trusting a Rams running back as anything more than a RB3/flex option. The matchup with Washington hasn’t been great for opposing running backs, as there’s been just one team of running backs to account for more than 17.2 PPR points, and that team of running backs was the Browns duo of Nick Chubb and Kareem Hunt. Running backs have actually totaled 111 touches through four games against them, which is the 15th-most in football, but the 463 total yards rank as the 11th-fewest in football. They’ve allowed just 0.75 PPR points per opportunity, which ranks as the seventh-lowest mark in the league, so volume has been paramount to a running backs success. This backfield has produced 29.5 touches per game, so even though Week 4 was a dud, there are enough touches to produce. Henderson is still the one I’d trust the most, though trusting him as anything more than an RB3 is too risky. Brown is teetering on the RB3/4 radar, while Akers is just a handcuff if he plays at all, as he’s been out of practice the last two weeks. He did return to a limited practice on Wednesday.

Week 5 Wide Receiver Rankings

Rank Wide Receivers Team Opp Best Worst Avg Std Dev Proj. Pts
1 DeAndre Hopkins ARI at NYJ 1 5 1.2 0.4 16.9
2 Tyreek Hill KC vs. LV 1 7 2.4 1.1 16.2
3 Adam Thielen MIN at SEA 2 7 3.2 1 15.9
4 D.K. Metcalf SEA vs. MIN 1 8 4.9 1.3 15.7
5 Tyler Lockett SEA vs. MIN 2 10 5 1.3 15.6
6 Amari Cooper DAL vs. NYG 3 8 5.8 1.4 15.4
7 Calvin Ridley ATL vs. CAR 4 14 7.1 1 15.2
8 Stefon Diggs BUF at TEN 6 11 8.3 1 14.5
9 Allen Robinson II CHI vs. TB 6 11 9.3 1.5 14.2
10 Keenan Allen LAC at NO 7 14 9.9 1.1 13.9
11 Cooper Kupp LAR at WAS 10 19 12.3 1.8 13.8
12 Mike Evans TB at CHI 10 24 14.2 3.5 13.8
13 D.J. Chark Jr. JAC at HOU 11 19 14.4 2 13.8
14 Robert Woods LAR at WAS 7 21 15.2 2.3 13.7
15 D.J. Moore CAR at ATL 11 25 15.4 2.6 13.5
16 Terry McLaurin WAS vs. LAR 11 20 15.8 2.1 13.3
17 Robby Anderson CAR at ATL 10 23 16.1 2.3 13.3
18 Will Fuller V HOU vs. JAC 12 25 18 2 13.3
19 Odell Beckham Jr. CLE vs. IND 16 24 19.2 2.2 13
20 DeVante Parker MIA at SF 19 26 21.5 1.6 12.6
21 Marquise Brown BAL vs. CIN 14 29 21.8 1.9 12.5
22 CeeDee Lamb DAL vs. NYG 18 28 23.4 2.5 12.4
23 Justin Jefferson MIN at SEA 17 29 23.8 2.4 12.4
24 Tyler Boyd CIN at BAL 16 29 24.6 2.1 12.4
25 JuJu Smith-Schuster PIT vs. PHI 15 30 24.9 3.4 12.2
26 Darius Slayton NYG at DAL 24 34 27.6 2.1 12.1
27 Michael Gallup DAL vs. NYG 23 39 28.2 2.6 12
28 Diontae Johnson PIT vs. PHI 19 36 28.4 3.1 11.9
29 Julian Edelman NE vs. DEN 15 37 29.4 4.4 11.7
30 John Brown BUF at TEN 30 40 33.4 2.4 11.7
31 T.Y. Hilton IND at CLE 28 45 33.4 3.7 11.2
32 Jerry Jeudy DEN at NE 31 52 33.8 2.3 10.7
33 Jamison Crowder NYJ vs. ARI 26 53 34.2 4.8 10.5
34 Jarvis Landry CLE vs. IND 29 43 34.4 2.7 10.5
35 Golden Tate NYG at DAL 34 43 36.6 2.4 10.4
36 A.J. Brown TEN vs. BUF 17 60 36.9 11.7 9.9
37 Laviska Shenault Jr. JAC at HOU 30 46 37.8 3.6 9.8
38 Tee Higgins CIN at BAL 34 47 39.4 1.9 9.7
39 Scotty Miller TB at CHI 33 52 40.4 4.4 9.7
40 Brandon Aiyuk SF vs. MIA 36 47 40.4 2.4 9.1
41 Russell Gage ATL vs. CAR 33 62 41.6 3.3 9
42 Brandin Cooks HOU vs. JAC 35 50 42.3 3.6 8.9
43 Sammy Watkins KC vs. LV 34 53 43.7 3.5 8.8
44 Deebo Samuel SF vs. MIA 31 53 45.2 4.7 8.8
45 Emmanuel Sanders NO vs. LAC 41 57 45.3 2 8.5
46 Hunter Renfrow LV at KC 33 57 46.1 5.3 8.5
47 A.J. Green CIN at BAL 38 61 46.9 5.2 8.5
48 Tre’Quan Smith NO vs. LAC 31 62 47.7 4.9 8.4
49 Michael Thomas NO vs. LAC 2 82 39.2 29.9 8.3
50 Mecole Hardman KC vs. LV 42 64 52.3 3.4 8.1

 
D.J. Moore (CAR)
I’m continuing to recommend buying Moore’s stock while it’s down. He’s being used in a different role than he was last year and it’s only a matter of time before that pays off. We’ll compare him to Robby Anderson below, but the one that’s typically tied to success is the percentage of their team’s air yards. Moore has 42.7 percent of the Panthers air yards while Anderson is at 35.4 percent. Both are very high, but it’s Moore who hasn’t scored yet. Now onto their Week 5 matchup, this could be the week we see Moore go nuts. When the Falcons allow a completion, it goes for plenty of yards per reception (15.2). That mark ranks as the third-highest in football, so it’s no wonder they’ve allowed a league-leading 21 pass plays to go for 20-plus yards. Moore plays most of his snaps at LWR, which means he’ll see Isaiah Oliver most of the time, a cornerback who’s struggled mightily since coming into the league, and it’s only gotten worse in 2020 as he’s allowed 19-of-28 passing for 277 yards and three touchdowns in his coverage. Moore should remain in lineups as a high-end WR2 this week who could have the game you’ve been waiting for.

Justin Jefferson (MIN)
Through four weeks, Jefferson leads the league in yards per route run (3.70). He’s now in a full-time role and it’s leading to fantasy points. It is worth noting that there’ll be some regression to his yards after the catch. Based on his separation at target, NFL’s NextGenStats suggest that he should be averaging around 4.5 yards after the catch, but he’s managed to average 8.1 yards to this point. He could very well be above average, but that’s the second-largest gap in the league with that particular stat. The Seahawks have allowed 336.3 yards per game… to receivers alone. I’m not making that up. You can go and double-check it. The volume is obviously there (135 targets), and so is the efficiency (9.96 yards per target). The 258.5 PPR points they’ve allowed to receivers is nearly 60 points more than any other team has allowed. It’s why we’ve already seen nine different receivers score 15-plus PPR points against them and finish as top-25 options. I can’t even begin to describe how ridiculous that is. Even if Thielen and Jefferson both finished top-25 this week, it would be an improvement on what they’ve allowed to this point. Digging even deeper, they’ve allowed 10 receivers to total 65-plus yards, which is great for projecting Jefferson’s floor. You could make the case for him to be played as a top-24 receiver this week.

T.Y. Hilton (IND)
Thanks to my friend JJ Zachariason, here are Hilton’s fantasy finishes over his last nine games (most recent last): 58, 64, 58, 61, 38, 50, 87, 56, and 76. That’s… not good. We do want to latch onto the fact that he’s the No. 1 receiver in this offense, but what does that really mean you’re your team is averaging just 30.3 pass attempts per game, and your target share is just 18.1 percent? We need more pass attempts and a higher target share for him to produce. Receivers have averaged a healthy 27.0 targets per game against the Browns, which ranks as the second-most in the league, but quarterbacks have also averaged a massive 45.5 pass attempts per game. It is worth noting that Hilton got loose behind the Bears secondary for what would’ve been a long touchdown, but Kyle Fuller opted to take a pass interference and hold him rather than allow the touchdown. Hilton moves back-and-forth on both sides of the formation, so he’ll see a mix of both Denzel Ward and Terrance Mitchell. As a whole, the Browns have allowed the second-most fantasy points to receivers, but volume is the reason, as they’ve allowed the 17th-most PPR points per target to them. Receivers have actually seen 20 targets against them in the red zone while no other team has seen more than 13 of them. You can’t say he’s a lock for much of anything, so we have to keep him in WR4 territory until he gets back on track. It helps to know that seven receivers have already finished as top-38 options against the Browns, but again, volume is the disconnect here.

Week 5 Tight End Rankings

Rank Tight Ends Team Opp Best Worst Avg Std Dev Proj. Pts
1 George Kittle SF vs. MIA 1 2 1.3 0.4 14.3
2 Travis Kelce KC vs. LV 1 4 1.8 0.5 14.3
3 Mark Andrews BAL vs. CIN 2 4 3.1 0.5 13.6
4 Darren Waller LV at KC 3 5 3.9 0.5 12.1
5 Hunter Henry LAC at NO 4 8 5.6 0.8 12
6 Zach Ertz PHI at PIT 5 9 6.2 1 11.2
7 Dalton Schultz DAL vs. NYG 5 11 8.2 1.1 10.7
8 Tyler Higbee LAR at WAS 7 11 8.3 1.2 8.8
9 Evan Engram NYG at DAL 6 13 9.1 1.4 8
10 Jonnu Smith TEN vs. BUF 3 18 10 4.4 7.6
11 Mike Gesicki MIA at SF 9 13 10.7 1.5 7.6
12 Hayden Hurst ATL vs. CAR 9 14 11.2 0.8 7.3
13 Rob Gronkowski TB at CHI 11 24 13.7 1.2 7.2
14 Jimmy Graham CHI vs. TB 11 20 15.3 1.9 7.1
15 Austin Hooper CLE vs. IND 12 18 15.7 1.5 7
16 Eric Ebron PIT vs. PHI 11 22 16 3 6.7
17 Logan Thomas WAS vs. LAR 14 20 16.3 1.7 6.7
18 Greg Olsen SEA vs. MIN 14 23 17.6 2.2 6.2
19 Mo Alie-Cox IND at CLE 10 24 19.8 2.2 6.1
20 Drew Sample CIN at BAL 15 24 20.4 1.5 5.7

 
Dalton Schultz (DAL)
Since taking over for Blake Jarwin as the starter, Schultz has been the No. 3 tight end in fantasy football. His worst game was a four-catch, 48-yard performance against the Seahawks. Any time you have a tight end averaging 8.0 targets per game from an offense that is scoring 31.5 points per game (third in NFL), you must pay attention. He did seem to suffer an injury towards the end of last week’s game, and it’s being listed as a thigh injury, so we’ll pay attention as the week goes on. The Giants have not been a team to attack with tight ends to this point, as they’ve allowed just 1.34 PPR points per target to them under the new defensive scheme. It certainly helps efficiency numbers when they’ve played against Eric Ebron, Jimmy Graham, Ross Dwelley, and Tyler Higbee, but still, they’ve done a solid job with the position. Knowing the volume should come down for the entire passing game this week in a game they’re projected to crush, we must lower expectations for Schultz, though he’s still on the low-end TE1 radar with his usage.

Greg Olsen (SEA)
We’re now four weeks into the season and Olsen still has a large gap on the routes run over Dissly. In Week 4, Olsen ran 22 routes while Dissly ran just nine of them. On the season, the tally is Olsen 103, Dissly 39, and Jacob Hollister 22. Olsen has been competent outside of the one Week 2 game, racking up five receptions in each of the last two games. He’s now finished as a top-16 tight end in three of four games, giving him streaming appeal. The Vikings were one of the best teams in the league against tight ends last year, but they’ve struggled a bit in 2020. They haven’t allowed a touchdown to them, keeping their overall numbers down, but the 75 percent completion-rate, and 14.83 yards per reception are both massive. It’s amounted to 11.13 yards per target, the third-highest mark in the league. Over their last three games, they’ve allowed 5/111/0 to Mo Alie-Cox, 5/61/0 to Jonnu Smith, and then 3/46/0 to Jordan Akins in a half of a game (left with concussion). If you wanted to stream Olsen as a high-end TE2, you shouldn’t let anyone talk you out of it.

View your league’s top available players with My Playbook >>


Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | SoundCloud | iHeartRadio

What's your take? Leave a comment

Follow the Pros!

Follow us on Twitter @FantasyPros for exclusive advice and contests