2019 Fantasy Baseball Rankings

Expert Consensus Ranking (61 of 62 Experts) -
Rank Player (Team, Position) Overall Notes
1 Nolan Arenado (COL - 3B) 3 1 3 1.5 0.6 6.0 +3.0
When it comes to elite production that you can bank on year in and year out, look no further than Arenado. Some people will quibble that his lack of steals makes him a four-category player, but that hasn't stopped Arenado from producing four straight seasons as a top-10 overall hitter in standard 5x5 leagues. The only other knock on Arenado is that he is much better in the thin air of Coors Field, but fresh off a record-breaking contract extension, fantasy owners no longer need to worry about the possibility of a mid-season trade out of Colorado. You can write it down in marker that he will provide around 40 home runs, 100 runs, 110 RBIs, and a batting average in the .290 range, making Arenado a nice bargain at his average draft position (ADP) of 6.8.
2 Jose Ramirez (CLE - 2B,3B) 5 1 5 1.8 1.0 3.0 -2.0
Ramirez was the fourth-most valuable player in standard 5x5 leagues last season, according to Baseball Monster, trailing only J.D. Martinez, Christian Yelich, and Mookie Betts. And that was with a .270 batting average that was 15 points below Ramirez's career .285 mark, due to an abnormally low .252 batting average on balls in play (BABIP). While Ramirez's average is very likely to rise, his career-high 39 home runs and 34 stolen bases are should go in the opposite direction. Still, we're talking about a player who can produce a 30-20 season with a plus batting average. It's hard to argue too much with his current ADP of third overall behind Mookie Betts and Mike Trout.
3 Alex Bregman (HOU - 3B,SS) 15 1 7 3.6 1.0 13.0 -2.0
Bregman's superstar ascension featured a stellar .286/.394/.532 slash line, 32 homers, and more walks (96) than strikeouts (85). He finished among the top five in contact, outside-swing, and swinging-strike rates, so the elite plate approach could feasibly net a .300 average in 2019. Yet a .463 xSLG suggests he hit his power ceiling, which is concerning considering the drop in steals (10). Drafters now must also monitor his progress from offseason arthroscopic surgery on his elbow, making Bregman a dicey proposition in the first round.
4 Manny Machado (SD - 3B,SS) 16 2 25 4.3 2.9 17.0 +1.0
Along with setting personal highs in each element of his .297/.367/.538 slash line, Machado bashed 37 homers and stole 14 bases, a significant development since he stole none in 2016. He has hit 33 homers in at least 690 plate appearances in each of the last four seasons, so he'd probably be considered a first-round lock if not for remaining unsigned. Now that he established 2017's funk as the clear outlier, Machado is a trustworthy stud eligible for shortstop and third (16 games) in most formats. Signing the Padres doesn't kill his worth, but he's someone to target near the Round ½ turn rather than inside the top 10.
5 Javier Baez (CHC - 2B,3B,SS) 23 1 9 4.8 1.2 18.0 -5.0
Despite recording the second-worst swinging strike (18.2%) and outside-swing (45.5%) rates, Baez managed to hit .290. Among 17 hitters with a contact rate of 70.0% or lower in at least 300 plate appearances, Aaron Judge was the only one besides Baez to bat above .266. That's a better baseline for 2019. Given his middling 4.5 walk %, he might not reach base enough to steal another 21 bases. Don't pay full freight for an encore.
6 Kris Bryant (CHC - 3B,RF) 28 3 8 5.9 1.0 33.0 +5.0
Everyone kept waiting for Bryant to turn the corner last season. They're still waiting. He hit a pedestrian .272/.374/.460 and continued a concerning power slide with 13 homers. The former MVP, who is only 27, was dealing with a shoulder injury. He could easily bounce back and deliver near first-round value, but drafters won't receive much of a discount at his third-round going rate. It's a fair price given his batting average and power upside, but the lack of speed and health certainty makes him far from a lock.
7 Anthony Rendon (WSH - 3B) DTD 37 4 12 6.9 1.2 41.0 +4.0
Diminishing speed and non-elite power make Rendon boring, but he's still a tremendous hitter who has batted above .300 and slugged over .500 in each of the last two seasons. After missing time with a bruised toe earlier in 2018, he posted a .391 wOBA (a mark matched by Jose Ramirez and Nolan Arenado all season) since the start of June. Stealing twice in three tries is a major bummer, but don't underestimate the worth of a .300, 25-homer hitter who could offer 90-100 runs and RBI apiece in the heart of Washington's lineup.
8 Eugenio Suarez (CIN - 3B) 47 7 12 8.6 1.2 55.0 +8.0
One of the game's most underappreciated stars, Suarez leveraged a massive hard-hit uptick into a career-high 34 homers. Yet his fly-ball rate (37.1%) stayed exactly the same as 2017, when he circled the bases 26 times. He's likely to split the difference, and a subpar second half (.245/.322/.463) will only fuel more skepticism. Yet it'd be foolish to ignore the other MVP-caliber half (.312/.399/.574). The 27-year-old third baseman could still offer a .275 average with around 30 homers and strong counting numbers around pick 50.
9 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (TOR - 3B) MiLB 65 6 35 10.6 2.7 53.0 -12.0
Guerrero profiles as a future superstar. He was unstoppable across four minor league levels last season, hitting .381 with 20 home runs in just 95 games. The projection systems universally expect him to rake from day one in the Major Leagues, envisioning that he is capable of hitting close to .300 with 20-25 home runs even while missing the first few weeks of the season due to service time considerations. He won't be good for more than a handful of stolen bases, but that hardly matters for a player who could someday soon lead the league in both batting average and home runs.
10 Matt Carpenter (STL - 1B,2B,3B) 71 5 33 11.4 3.0 65.0 -6.0
Despite entering the season with health woes and batting .155 in April, Carpenter then went scorched earth to hit .257/.374/.523 with a career-high 36 homers. It's dicey to bet on a 33-year-old coming off a career year, but he simply punishes baseball too severely to discredit. He led qualified hitters in hard-hit rate (49.0%) with the fifth-highest fly-ball rate (46.9%) and fourth-lowest popup rate (2.1%). Given his elite blend of hitting the ball hard, high, and far, Statcast's .535 XSLG and .386 xwOBA even offer room for growth. Expect more elite power in 2019.
11 Justin Turner (LAD - 3B) 82 7 27 12.5 2.8 88.0 +6.0
Batting average is difficult to come by after the first four or five rounds, but then there is Turner, who over the last five seasons, has racked up a .305 batting average which beats out plays like Trout, Yelich and Freeman. There isn't a ton in the way of homers or steals, but he won't hurt you in any category unless he deals with yet another injury. For that reason, he is a bit risky.
12 Miguel Andujar (NYY - 3B,DH) DL10 96 8 34 13.2 2.7 79.0 -17.0
Right out of the gate, Andujar provided a rare blend of elite contact (.297 BA) and power (27 HRs) for the Yankees. A 4.1% walk rate is far from ideal, and atrocious defense at third base limits his real-life value. Neither flaw hurt his five-by-five worth last season, but beware paying the Yankee Tax on a youngster who may have peaked early. Statcast's .319 xwOBA hints at some potential sophomore regression.
13 Josh Donaldson (ATL - 3B,DH) 93 7 23 13.9 3.6 89.0 -4.0
Over the last two years, Donaldson has missed half of his team's games, but he has still be exceptional when he plays, with 41 homers, 101 RBIs and 95 runs in 165 games. If he is healthy, you've got a second round value, but that is a big if so proceed at your own risk.
14 Travis Shaw (MIL - 1B,3B,2B) 90 8 25 14.2 2.7 97.0 +7.0
Shaw followed 2017's 31-homer breakout with one more last year, but his 10 steals sliced in half while his average slithered from .273 to .241. That's a peculiar drop considering he also set career bests in walk (13.3%) and strikeout (18.4%) rates with a rise in barrels per batted balls (10.3%). Last year was the time to pass, but drafters should jump back in now that Shaw comes at a cheaper price with second-base eligibility.
15 Matt Chapman (OAK - 3B) 89 7 20 14.2 2.2 103.0 +14.0
Although he underwent offseason surgery, Chapman is expected to be ready by Oakland's season opener in Tokyo on March 20. Fantasy investors don't reap the rewards of his Gold Glove at third, and typical five-by-five gamers didn't fully benefit from his 42 doubles. Yet those strengths led to a steadfast starting role and 100 runs scored. Having towered as many as 36 homers in a minor league season, he could expand upon last season's 23. He also make quiet contact gains to support his .278 batting average, so even if Chapman doesn't take another step further, he also won't regress as much as most projections expect.
16 Wil Myers (SD - 3B,LF,RF) 92 9 21 14.6 2.9 100.0 +8.0
Myers is commonly thought of as injury prone and last year's 79 missed games certainly doesn't help. With that said, he averages 23 homers and 20 steals over the last three years even despite last year's disappointing season. There is major upside here even though his batting average is almost certain to stay under .260 again.
17 Mike Moustakas (MIL - 3B,DH) DTD 108 8 22 16.2 3.0 139.0 +31.0
Moustakas rejoined the Brewers on his second straight one-year deal, so drafters might have missed their window to snag a power bat at a discount. He didn't fare any better with the Brewers (.256/.326/.441) than the Royals (.249/.309/.468), but a park and lineup upgrade should boost the third baseman's draft price. While the ultra-high launch angle limits his batting-average upside despite a career 15.6% strikeout rate, he'll broach another 30 long runs now that he's signed with time to get ready by Opening Day.
18 Rafael Devers (BOS - 3B) 117 9 24 17.4 2.7 142.0 +25.0
Let's remember that Devers is only 22, and his "bad" season still consisted of 21 homers in 490 plate appearances. Although his rapid rise stalled with a .240/.298/.433 slash line, he showed some growth down the stretch with a 10.6% walk rate and .227 ISO after the All-Star break. He has slimmed down during the offseason, so the former uber-prospect is more than capable of circling the bases 25-30 times with a higher batting average. If so, this will be the last time he's available this late.
19 Max Muncy (LAD - 1B,2B,3B) 121 9 34 17.8 4.8 110.0 -11.0
Muncy had batted .195 with five homers in 245 big league plate appearances prior to 2018, so he naturally towered 35 homers with a .407 wOBA. He endured some troubling strikeout woes late in the season and playoffs, but there are plenty of reasons not to anticipate the bottom falling out entirely. Along with a gorgeous 16.4% walk rate, the late bloomer notched a heavy dosage of fly balls (44.9%, only 5.9% popups) and hard hits (47.4%). Per Statcast, only Joey Gallo served up a higher rate of barrels per batted balls than Muncy's 16.9. He's a solid power pick-and tremendous OBP target-if the rest of the room sees an obvious regression candidate.
20 Jurickson Profar (OAK - 1B,2B,3B,SS) 159 11 32 20.7 2.8 140.0 -19.0
It took a bit longer than expected, but Profar finally emerged as a strong major leaguer by batting .254/.335/.458 with 20 homers and 10 steals. The Rangers oddly moved him to the A's, a move that presents a major ballpark downgrade after he slugged .511 in Arlington. Aside from a possible average uptick, the skills don't portend another leap forward. Perhaps the biggest incentive to drafting Profar is gleaning eligibility at first base, third, shortstop, and even second (10 games) in some leagues.
21 Eduardo Escobar (ARI - 3B,SS) 199 13 44 23.8 3.8 176.0 -23.0
 
22 Carlos Santana (CLE - 1B,3B) 163 10 37 21.3 4.0 178.0 +15.0
A smooth selection (sorry) for OBP managers, Santana batted .229 after back-to-back .259 campaigns. He actually slashed his strikeout rate (13.7%) for the fourth straight season with a gaudy 16.2% walk rate. Having exceeded 600 plate appearances in each of the last eight seasons, he's an excellent compiler who could again broach 80 runs and RBI apiece with around 25 home runs. That will make him a sharp corner infielder if his batting average repairs closer to his career .247 mark, which matches last season's xBA on Statcast. He added third-base eligibility (19 games) in some leagues and could gain outfield during the season.
23 Maikel Franco (PHI - 3B) 234 18 36 26.4 4.0 257.0 +23.0
Franco has always had plenty of potential, but has yet to put it together for a full season. Over his final 350 at-bats last year, he was excellent and now that the Phillies bulked up their lineup, it is possible that Franco could break out for a .280, 25 homer, 100 RBI season.
24 Jake Lamb (ARI - 3B) DL10 231 20 36 26.5 3.2 265.0 +34.0
You may not feel great about drafting Lamb after his trainwreck 2018 season, but he is just one year removed from 30 homers and 105 RBIs so don't sleep on him bouncing back. With that said, the move to the humidor in Arizona makes it seem as though his ceiling is a bit lower than what we saw from him in 2017.
25 Yuli Gurriel (HOU - 1B,3B,DH) 224 17 39 25.0 4.5 184.0 -40.0
The only first basemen to bat at least .290 in each of the last two years? Freddie Freeman, Paul Goldschmidt, and Yuli Gurriel. Houston's career .291 hitter is an underrated stabilizer in batting average who can also drive in 75-85 runs in a stacked lineup. He even popped five homers in September after a long power drought, so the veteran should at least offer double-digit long balls. He's a boring, but productive depth piece for a drafter who loaded up on high-power average liabilities.
26 Asdrubal Cabrera (TEX - 2B,3B,SS) DTD 241 20 45 27.9 5.6 199.0 -42.0
Now that Cabrera is with the Rangers and expected to play every day, we can feel comfortable grabbing him late in drafts as a reliable source of power to go with a decent batting average.
27 Miguel Sano (MIN - 1B,3B,DH) DL10 265 14 40 30.4 5.5 269.0 +4.0
Sano, who has never recorded 500 plate appearances in a big league season, is unlikely to reach that mark in 2019. After injuring his heel during the offseason, he's not expected to be ready until May, at the earliest. There's still the matter of him hitting .199/.281/.398 with a 38.5% strikeout rate last season. While he makes too much hard contact to again bat below the Mendoza line, all the punchouts make him unlikely to climb much higher than his career .244 clip. Because of these holes, drafters should be able to stash a 25-year-old with a high walk rate and top-shelf power on the cheap. Only take him in five-by-five drafts if needing power and getting a steep discount.
28 Nick Senzel (CIN - 3B) MiLB 250 19 53 27.7 5.3 206.0 -44.0
Fantasy owners were disappointed to get nothing out of Senzel at the MLB level last year, but they shouldn't give up hope. Rather, barring another series of injuries, he will be with the big league club, weather in Cincy, Miami, San Diego or Cleveland (pending potential trades) rather quickly. He is a true five-tool player and could end up qualifying at 2B, 3B, SS and OF.
29 Evan Longoria (SF - 3B) 277 22 44 31.7 4.6 354.0 +77.0
Longoria had a rough season for fantasy owners in 2018, but the batting average was held back by an abnormally low BABIP and his power was right on track for another 20 to 25 homers had he been healthy for the full season. In deeper leagues, his reliability is exactly what you should be targeting.
30 Brian Anderson (MIA - 3B,RF) 275 23 43 31.0 3.9 325.0 +50.0
 
31 Kyle Seager (SEA - 3B) DL60 296 20 51 34.3 7.3 270.0 -26.0
Seager is starting the season on the DL after hand surgery and may miss the first six weeks. As a result, you may not want to draft him, but he should be in the back of your mind as a waiver wire pickup within a couple of weeks. He is a reliable source of power and shouldn't hurt you in batting average as much as we saw last year.
32 Jed Lowrie (NYM - 2B,3B) DL10 279 21 45 31.7 5.3 281.0 +2.0
Lowrie gave fantasy owners a surprising boost in power last season in Oakland and always offers a decent batting average. He might start the season on the DL with a knee injury, but once he returns, Lowrie should be owned in every league.
33 Jeimer Candelario (DET - 3B) 282 23 58 32.5 5.3 342.0 +60.0
There is nothing sexy about drafting Candelario, but you can anticipate his batting average coming up 20 points this year, as he was among the most unlucky hitters in that department last year. Along with that, fantasy owners should get around 20 homers from him.
34 Wilmer Flores (ARI - 1B,2B,3B) 284 15 51 31.9 6.8 364.0 +80.0
Over the last four seasons, Flores has been a useful fantasy player when he gets at-bats, posting 21 homers, 72 RBIs and a .267 batting average per 162 games. He should see plenty of playing time in Arizona this year and qualifies at second base, driving up his value.
35 Ian Happ (CHC - 3B,LF,CF,RF) MiLB 330 21 52 34.8 7.1 324.0 -6.0
There isn't a direct path to consistent playing time in the Cubs lineup for Happ, but you can bet Maddon will find a way to get him nearly 400 at-bats, and if one of their starters suffers an injury, Happ has an outside chance at 25 homers and 15 steals which would be an incredible value late into drafts.
36 Jung Ho Kang (PIT - 3B) 304 19 54 32.3 7.3 344.0 +40.0
Kang may not open the season as the starter in Pittsburgh, but with the way he is playing this spring, you'll want to keep a close eye on him. After all, we've seen Kang be a useful fantasy piece in years prior.
37 Ryan McMahon (COL - 1B,2B,3B) 297 19 59 30.1 7.7 307.0 +10.0
McMahon may have struggled in a limited sample last year, but there are countless fantasy baseball studs with that on their resume as rookies. The fact of the matter is that the dude can hit. In 125 Triple-A games, he has tallied 68 extra-base hits with a .337 batting average. Over a full season, that would have been close to 90! Not only that, but he should steal double-digit bases as well while qualifying for potentially every position except shortstop and catcher. If the Rockies make room in their lineup for him, we are looking at one of the biggest breakout candidates of 2019.
38 Niko Goodrum (DET - 1B,2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 345 22 57 36.1 5.5 298.0 -47.0
 
39 Zack Cozart (LAA - 2B,3B,SS) 356 23 51 39.1 5.7 460.0 +104.0
Cozart may miss time at the start of the season with a mild calf strain, and after his 2018 performance, it is fair to forget about him, but don't be so quick to forget how excellent he was in 2017 with the Reds, knocking 24 homers with a .297 batting average in just 122 games.
40 Willians Astudillo (MIN - C,3B) 363 24 62 38.2 6.5 282.0 -81.0
With a strikeout rate below five percent at every level of the minors -- and during his 30 game cup of coffee with the Twins last year -- Astudillo has the kind of high-level contact skills that can make him an asset in batting average, particularly at the weak-hitting catcher position. He could also pop 15 home runs if given regular at-bats, but it's his at-bat total that is the big question. Astudillo isn't guaranteed a roster spot, let alone a starting job, but if he can find a way to reach 300+ plate appearances, he will be an intriguing dark horse candidate to finish as a top-12 catcher in mixed leagues. He's worth monitoring closely in Spring Training.
41 Johan Camargo (ATL - 3B,SS) 399 31 62 42.9 6.1 380.0 -19.0
Camargo flew under the radar last season and somehow swatted 19 homers and batted .272 in a utility role. He should get back to those 450 at-bats this year thanks to all the positions he plays, and we know his bat can be trusted while he is in the lineup.
42 Eduardo Nunez (BOS - 2B,3B) DL10 417 22 65 44.9 7.3 384.0 -33.0
 
43 Scott Kingery (PHI - 3B,SS) DL10 435 28 58 44.7 5.7 400.0 -35.0
Kingery was dreadful last year. No one can deny that, but he is still young and offers 20/20 upside if his bat finds a way into the lineup at any number of positions. The is minimal risk at taking a chance on him late in drafts.
44 Tim Beckham (SEA - 3B,SS) 395 25 62 44.1 7.7 392.0 -3.0
 
45 Todd Frazier (NYM - 3B) DL10 427 26 58 46.1 6.1 494.0 +67.0
Frazier is already a little banged up and has Peter Alonso breathing down his neck, but as long as he is in the lineup, you can expect a 25 homer, 10 stolen base pace, but with a lousy batting average that will bring your team down. Even still, he is a worthwhile depth piece in deeper leagues.
46 Yandy Diaz (TB - 3B) 428 25 55 42.6 6.1 394.0 -34.0
 
47 Yolmer Sanchez (CWS - 2B,3B) 407 26 79 44.6 8.7 578.0 +171.0
 
48 Chad Pinder (OAK - 2B,3B,LF,RF) 409 23 64 41.7 10.1 572.0 +163.0
 
49 Renato Nunez (BAL - 3B) 438 28 74 44.2 9.5 588.0 +150.0
 
50 David Fletcher (LAA - 2B,3B) 437 27 71 47.9 9.5 591.0 +154.0
 
51 Colin Moran (PIT - 1B,3B) 481 30 62 49.8 6.8 575.0 +94.0
 
52 Hernan Perez (MIL - 2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 456 36 59 48.5 6.2 413.0 -43.0
Although Perez likely won't steal 34 bases like we saw in 2016, he is a sufficient source of speed late into drafts with enough at-bats that he'll add counting stats. There won't be much in the way of power, but his batting average won't kill you either.
53 Isiah Kiner-Falefa (TEX - C,2B,3B) 433 29 72 48.5 8.0 339.0 -94.0
 
54 Matt Duffy (TB - 3B) DL10 480 26 65 50.8 6.4 483.0 +3.0
 
55 Hunter Dozier (KC - 1B,3B,RF) 489 30 75 49.6 9.1 597.0 +108.0
 
56 Neil Walker (MIA - 1B,2B,3B) 547 36 66 53.2 7.5 432.0 -115.0
 
57 Jedd Gyorko (STL - 2B,3B) 542 34 64 55.3 5.7 635.0 +93.0
 
58 Brandon Drury (TOR - 2B,3B) 550 35 76 57.6 10.4 518.0 -32.0
 
59 J.P. Crawford (SEA - 3B,SS) MiLB 524 36 65 54.5 7.2 612.0 +88.0
 
60 Chris Owings (KC - 2B,3B,CF,RF) 508 39 68 55.3 7.7 624.0 +116.0
 
61 Russell Martin (LAD - C,3B) DL10 521 38 99 57.1 17.4 417.0 -104.0
 
62 Aledmys Diaz (HOU - 3B,SS) 561 40 73 58.3 9.1 566.0 +5.0
 
63 Alen Hanson (TOR - 2B,3B,SS,LF) 579 38 70 58.7 7.5 619.0 +40.0
 
64 Yairo Munoz (STL - 3B,SS,CF) 728 43 81 60.9 9.8 476.0 -252.0
 
65 J.D. Davis (NYM - 1B,3B) 545 22 101 63.5 17.1 559.0 +14.0
 
66 Yangervis Solarte (SF - 2B,3B,SS) 591 32 70 58.0 8.9 604.0 +13.0
 
67 Erik Gonzalez (PIT - 1B,2B,3B,SS) DL60 636 41 79 62.2 11.8 688.0 +52.0
 
68 Matt Davidson (TEX - 1B,3B,DH) MiLB 586 44 81 63.6 10.5 694.0 +108.0
 
69 Daniel Robertson (TB - 2B,3B,SS) 768 52 80 63.9 9.1 500.0 -268.0
 
70 Wilmer Difo (WSH - 2B,3B) 693 50 77 66.9 6.2 535.0 -158.0
 
71 Austin Riley (ATL - 3B) MiLB 832 52 98 73.1 14.2 508.0 -324.0
 
72 David Freese (LAD - 1B,3B) 615 44 74 67.2 5.9 525.0 -90.0
 
73 Christian Villanueva (3B) FA 707 55 79 66.6 9.3 606.0 -101.0
 
74 Taylor Ward (LAA - 3B) MiLB 673 53 83 70.1 9.8 674.0 +1.0
 
75 Martin Prado (MIA - 3B) 720 50 84 69.9 10.6 613.0 -107.0
 
76 Patrick Wisdom (TEX - 3B) 588 32 88 70.5 8.2 702.0 +114.0
 
77 Miguel Rojas (MIA - 1B,3B,SS) 1172 52 90 69.4 12.1 641.0 -531.0
 
78 Rio Ruiz (BAL - 3B) 1152 57 89 73.0 12.1    
 
79 Cory Spangenberg (MIL - 2B,3B,LF) MiLB 762 51 93 76.5 10.8 589.0 -173.0
 
80 David Bote (CHC - 2B,3B) 719 43 79 71.5 5.8 517.0 -202.0
 
81 Logan Forsythe (TEX - 2B,3B) 692 53 109 77.2 16.9 712.0 +20.0
 
82 Christian Arroyo (TB - 2B,3B) MiLB 573 40 127 83.7 24.4 675.0 +102.0
 
83 Alex Blandino (CIN - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 780 59 107 84.8 17.2    
 
84 Pablo Sandoval (SF - 1B,3B) 1213 61 97 85.0 12.6 649.0 -564.0
 
85 Tommy La Stella (LAA - 2B,3B) 1187 62 94 80.3 11.7    
 
86 Kyle Farmer (CIN - 3B) 1250 64 102 90.5 15.5 915.0 -335.0
 
87 Kaleb Cowart (LAA - 2B,3B) MiLB 770 53 118 93.0 19.9 994.0 +224.0
 
88 Cheslor Cuthbert (KC - 1B,3B,DH) MiLB 1290 66 111 98.0 18.5    
 
89 Daniel Descalso (CHC - 1B,2B,3B) 905 66 86 74.8 6.9 541.0 -364.0
 
90 Ke'Bryan Hayes (PIT - 3B) MiLB 1328 45 125 100.6 23.4 798.0 -530.0
 
91 Jose Osuna (PIT - 1B,3B,RF) DL10 706 57 96 82.0 10.6 820.0 +114.0
 
92 Ehire Adrianza (MIN - 1B,3B,SS) 718 60 90 79.8 6.3 735.0 +17.0
 
93 Charlie Culberson (ATL - 3B,SS,LF) 734 70 81 76.2 2.9 510.0 -224.0
 
94 Taylor Davis (CHC - 1B,3B) 1232 74 110 94.3 15.1 955.0 -277.0
 
95 Michael Chavis (BOS - 3B) 1260 77 117 100.8 14.7 577.0 -683.0
 
96 Ronald Torreyes (MIN - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1297 79 117 100.0 14.2 765.0 -532.0
 
97 Tony Renda (BOS - 2B,3B,LF) 1177 80 103 91.3 9.4    
 
98 Jose Reyes (2B,3B,SS) FA   80 100 90.0 10.0 785.0  
 
99 Ronny Rodriguez (DET - 2B,3B,SS) 1220 81 98 91.3 7.4 756.0 -464.0
 
100 Kevin Kramer (PIT - 3B) MiLB 1026 82 105 90.3 8.8    
 
101 Drew Jackson (BAL - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1181 82 92 86.3 4.2 866.0 -315.0
 
102 T.J. Rivera (2B,3B) FA 1042 83 104 91.7 9.0    
 
103 Greg Garcia (SD - 2B,3B,SS) 1254 83 103 96.0 9.2    
 
104 Ryder Jones (SF - 1B,3B) MiLB 1299 84 122 103.0 14.1 930.0 -369.0
 
105 Cristhian Adames (CHC - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1185 84 120 99.0 15.3    
 
106 Luis Guillorme (NYM - 3B) MiLB 1307 85 115 105.5 12.0 957.0 -350.0
 
107 Ramon Torres (KC - 3B) FA 1191 86 122 101.0 15.3    
 
108 Rosell Herrera (MIA - 2B,3B,CF,RF) 1269 86 120 103.3 13.9 999.0 -270.0
 
109 Jose Bautista (3B,LF,RF) FA   86 102 94.0 8.0 710.0  
 
110 Yadiel Rivera (MIA - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB   87 124 105.5 18.5    
 
111 Pedro Alvarez (MIA - 3B,DH) NRI 1208 89 101 95.3 4.9    
 
112 Mitch Walding (PHI - 3B) 1287 93 114 104.3 8.7 967.0 -320.0
 
113 Pete Kozma (DET - 3B,SS) NRI   97 127 112.0 15.0    
 
114 Jace Peterson (BAL - 2B,3B,LF,RF) NRI 1271 98 108 103.7 4.2 825.0 -446.0
 
115 Ryan Flaherty (CLE - 3B) MiLB 1303 99 128 112.7 11.9    
 
116 Chase d'Arnaud (TEX - 2B,3B) NRI 1240 100 109 103.0 4.2    
 
117 Cliff Pennington (NYY - 3B) MiLB   104 125 114.5 10.5    
 
118 Gio Urshela (NYY - 3B,SS) 1309 106 116 111.7 4.2    
 
119 Kelvin Gutierrez (KC - 3B) MiLB 1302 110 118 113.7 3.3    
 
120 Emilio Bonifacio (TB - 2B,3B,LF) MiLB 1316 112 119 115.0 2.9 876.0 -440.0
 
121 Dustin Peterson (DET - 3B,LF) 1327 113 124 117.7 4.6    
 
122 Marco Hernandez (BOS - 2B,3B) D10 1325 115 123 119.0 3.3