2019 Fantasy Baseball Rankings

Expert Consensus Ranking (56 of 58 Experts) -
Rank Player (Team, Position) Overall Notes
1 Mike Trout (LAA - CF,DH) 1 1 1 1.0 0.0 1.0
Trout only played 140 games in 2018 due to a brief DL stint, but he still finished as the eighth-most valuable hitter in standard 5x5 leagues. It was the second straight season Trout missed time with injuries, but that is just about the only fault you can find in his fantasy game. Consistently excellent when he's on the field, expect him to once again approach 40 HRs with 20+ steals and a batting average over .300.
2 J.D. Martinez (BOS - LF,RF,DH) 4 1 4 2.2 0.6 5.0 +1.0
There is no better bet in baseball to hit .300 with 40+ home runs than Martinez. He's now accomplished that feat two years in a row, hit at least 38 homers in three of the last four seasons, and hit over .300 in four of the last five. Still in the prime of his career and in a great hitting environment in Boston, a repeat performance looks likely.
3 Aaron Judge (NYY - RF,DH) DL10 14 2 6 3.3 0.7 15.0 +1.0
After scorching a rookie-record 52 homers in 52, Judge settled for 27 in 498 plate appearances last season. Yet a feared average regression never materialized, as he batted .278 despite posting a 30.5 strikeout %. He led all hitters in average exit velocity (94.7 mph) with the highest % of batted balls hit a least 95 mph (54.1), so don't make the mistake of expecting a regressed BABIP to ruin his average. He might have peaked right out of the gate, but Judge should at least settle into 35-40 homers with a handful of steals if last year's oblique injuries don't resurface.
4 Giancarlo Stanton (NYY - LF,RF,DH) DL10 18 2 6 3.7 0.6 22.0 +4.0
Stanton's ISO dropped .107 points, and he was still pretty good. Spoiled Yankees fans got antsy all 211 times he struck out, but the star slugger still smashed 38 homers with a .360 wOBA. After spending years worrying about his health, it was encouraging to see him play 158 games (mostly at DH), which allowed him to compile 100 RBI and 102 runs in a stacked lineup. He gave back most of 2017's contact gains, so expect a batting average closer to 2018's .266. Now that durability isn't a pressing concern, that's good enough for drafters to take his bankable power-even if we're talking 40 instead of 60 homers-to close out the second round.
5 Khris Davis (OAK - LF,DH) 38 2 17 6.4 2.0 42.0 +4.0
Davis' consistently extends his uncanny streak of batting .247 in four straight seasons. He's also the only player to deposit at least 40 homers in each of the last three seasons. MLB's league-wide batting average dipped to .248 last season, so Oakland's slugger won't torpedo that category. And while power is now easier to find later in drafts, elite power remains a major asset. Having only played 11 games in the outfield, he won't have a position in some leagues. That utility-only label could turn him into a value, as drafters are needlessly reticent of taking such players.
6 Whit Merrifield (KC - 1B,2B,CF,RF,DH) 39 5 23 6.7 3.0 32.0 -7.0
Merrifield not only absconded an MLB-high 45 steals but also batted .304 with 12 homers and 43 doubles. That's borderline extinct skill set justifies his spot as an upper-echelon pick, but beware some regression. His batting average rose despite modest drops in contact and strikeout rates, and no speedster should hold a 14.7% infield-fly rate. Still, there aren't many .280, 12-35 hitters either.
7 George Springer (HOU - CF,RF,DH) 43 4 10 7.1 1.4 48.0 +5.0
It was a rough year for Springer Dingers, as the Astros outfielder deposited just 22 homers with a pedestrian .265/.346/.434 slash line. Thumb and quad injuries sapped his power late in the season and limited him to 140 games for the second straight year, and yet he managed over 100 runs for the third consecutive campaign. Caught stealing 21 times in 41 times, he's no longer a steals asset. He's looking more like a floor compiler who could underwhelm without a return to roughly 30 dingers.
8 Nelson Cruz (MIN - DH) 53 1 14 8.4 2.1 91.0 +38.0
Cruz has seen his batting average fall from .302 slowly down to .256 over the last four seasons, but the homers and RBIs are still firmly among the top of the league even despite his advanced again. You can rely on his durability and power in 2019 so don't hesitate to grab him in the 6th or 7th round.
9 Jose Abreu (CWS - 1B,DH) 52 5 12 8.7 1.3 74.0 +22.0
The always reliable Abreu fell short of a .290 batting average (.265) and 100 RBI (78) for the first time in his five-year MLB tenure. Just as he was kicking into high gear in August (.338/.380/.676), a thigh injury ended his season early. His .294 BABIP plummeted below his .329 career norm without any accompanying dips in contact and strikeouts, so it's easy envisioning an average rebound to at least .280. Although he may not return to 30 homers, he shouldn't miss by much if healthy. This could be a chance to buy a steady producer at a discount.
10 Gary Sanchez (NYY - C,DH) DL10 78 5 22 12.2 3.3 51.0 -27.0
There is no getting past the fact that Sanchez was a train wreck last season., batting .186 with only 18 homers. With that said, he is still just 26 years old and we are talking about the fastest player to ever reach 50 homers in the MLB. Chance are high that he will bounce back in the batting average department, and if he can stay healthy, bank on 25 to 40 homers making him well worth a 7th or 8th round pick.
11 Justin Upton (LAA - LF,DH) DL10 86 7 23 12.4 3.1 94.0 +8.0
Upton is one of the only players with at least 30 homers in each of the last three seasons. You can also bank on 80+ RBIs and runs, and while his stolen bases have come down over the years, 10 is a good bet once again. Upton's batting average won't help you, but it should be enough to warrant a sixth round pick in standard leagues.
12 Josh Donaldson (ATL - 3B,DH) 93 5 22 13.0 3.6 89.0 -4.0
Over the last two years, Donaldson has missed half of his team's games, but he has still be exceptional when he plays, with 41 homers, 101 RBIs and 95 runs in 165 games. If he is healthy, you've got a second round value, but that is a big if so proceed at your own risk.
13 Miguel Andujar (NYY - 3B,DH) DL10 95 8 37 13.1 3.9 79.0 -16.0
Right out of the gate, Andujar provided a rare blend of elite contact (.297 BA) and power (27 HRs) for the Yankees. A 4.1% walk rate is far from ideal, and atrocious defense at third base limits his real-life value. Neither flaw hurt his five-by-five worth last season, but beware paying the Yankee Tax on a youngster who may have peaked early. Statcast's .319 xwOBA hints at some potential sophomore regression.
14 Rougned Odor (TEX - 2B,DH) DL10 99 7 21 14.2 2.6 133.0 +34.0
Odor settled for 18 homers in 129 games after offering 33 and 30 long balls in the last two seasons, respectively. Yet he made demonstrative improvements as an actual player, upping his wOBA from .272 to .325 and fWAR from -1.2 to 2.5. A more selective approach led to a career-high 8.0% walk rate and a respectable .253 batting average. He should at least rebound closer to 25 homers, but there's some concern that Texas throws up a red (or at least yellow) light after getting caught in half of his 24 steals attempts. He's still only 25, so it's worth the gamble beyond the top-100 picks if searching for a power-speed punch.
15 Michael Brantley (HOU - LF,DH) 105 9 26 15.2 2.9 107.0 +2.0
Just as everyone gave up on the oft-injured Brantley, he returned from a significant ankle injury to bat .309/.364/.468 with 17 homers and 12 steals in 631 plate appearances. No qualified hitter made more contact (90.9%) than the 31-year-old outfielder, whose 9.5% strikeout rate finished second after Andrelton Simmons. His skill set is likely to get undervalued by drafters seeking flashier power or speed, and he could easily score 100+ runs in the Astros slot him atop their lineup. Health is the only concern.
16 Mike Moustakas (MIL - 3B,DH) DTD 108 8 20 15.3 2.4 139.0 +31.0
Moustakas rejoined the Brewers on his second straight one-year deal, so drafters might have missed their window to snag a power bat at a discount. He didn't fare any better with the Brewers (.256/.326/.441) than the Royals (.249/.309/.468), but a park and lineup upgrade should boost the third baseman's draft price. While the ultra-high launch angle limits his batting-average upside despite a career 15.6% strikeout rate, he'll broach another 30 long runs now that he's signed with time to get ready by Opening Day.
17 Edwin Encarnacion (SEA - 1B,DH) 112 7 24 15.9 2.9 113.0 +1.0
Even in a down year, Encarnacion topped 30 homers for the seventh straight season, a span during which 2014's 98 RBI was the only time he fell short of 100. That bankable power is comforting at his depreciating price, but career worsts in contact (75.7%) and strikeout (22.9%) rate led to his lowest average (.248) since 2010. The durable slugger also missed time with a biceps injury during his age-35 campaign, so don't reach for name recognition. That shouldn't be necessary, as ADPs beyond the top 100 suggest he could fall into your lap.
18 Miguel Cabrera (DET - 1B,DH) 140 8 27 17.8 3.6 152.0 +12.0
On the bright side, Cabrera recorded a .360 wOBA after notching a career-low .313 in 2017. The only problem: He played just 38 games due to a ruptured left biceps tendon. Don't bank on a fully healthy season from the first baseman, who turns 36 in April and has averaged 111 games over the last four seasons. Yet last year proved he's still a prolific hitter when healthy, even if no longer a massive home-run threat. If he falls beyond pick 150, it's worth rolling the dice on one of this generation's best sluggers churning out one more vintage season before his Hall of Fame career bites the dust.
19 Corey Dickerson (PIT - LF,DH) DL10 175 14 29 20.9 2.7 204.0 +29.0
 
20 Wilson Ramos (NYM - C,DH) 177 12 34 21.0 4.4 136.0 -41.0
Since undergoing Lasik surgery before the 2016 season, Ramos has registered a .298/.343/.483 slash line with 20 homers per 500 plate appearances. Yet 2016 ended with a torn ACL, and a hamstring injury interrupted last year's All-Star campaign. After moving to the Mets, the 31-year-old can no longer DH, and a 54.9% ground-ball rate tempers his power upside. Despite all of these warts, he's a catcher with a good bat. He's a top-five option, just not one to lunge for before Salvador Perez or Yasmani Grandal.
21 Justin Smoak (TOR - 1B,DH) 190 16 30 21.8 2.9 197.0 +7.0
While Smoak fell off from 2017's 38 homers and 133 wRC+, he still chipped in 25 homers and a 121 wRC+ with help from a stellar 14.0% walk rate in 594 plate appearances. He also dealt with a wrist injury early in the season while maintaining impressive hard-hit (41.5%) and barrel (10.5%) rates. With an ADP outside the top 200, he merely needs to repeat 2018, preferably with some better run production in more games. Yet 30 homers is still in play, in which case he'll make a great corner-infield bargain.
22 Shin-Soo Choo (TEX - LF,RF,DH) 206 4 29 22.8 2.6 260.0 +54.0
 
23 Yuli Gurriel (HOU - 1B,3B,DH) 220 17 33 23.5 3.2 184.0 -36.0
The only first basemen to bat at least .290 in each of the last two years? Freddie Freeman, Paul Goldschmidt, and Yuli Gurriel. Houston's career .291 hitter is an underrated stabilizer in batting average who can also drive in 75-85 runs in a stacked lineup. He even popped five homers in September after a long power drought, so the veteran should at least offer double-digit long balls. He's a boring, but productive depth piece for a drafter who loaded up on high-power average liabilities.
24 C.J. Cron (MIN - 1B,DH) 216 15 33 24.1 3.4 243.0 +27.0
While he won't help much in batting average, Cron did hit 30 homers in just 140 games last season. He may see a further bump with full playing time and a ballpark upgrade from Tampa to Minnesota.
25 Pete Alonso (NYM - 1B,DH) 229 10 32 24.3 4.1 234.0 +5.0
Like Vlad Jr. and Eloy, Alonso's true impact will depend on whether on not the big league club makes space for him. As it stands now, Todd Frazier is likely to play first base with Jed Lowrie manning the other corner. It is possible that Alonso pushes the envelope in the spring, forcing Lowrie to shortstop, but more than likely, we are looking at his arrival coming when the first infielder heads to the DL. With an older group of players, that may be sooner than later. When he arrives, he will come with a dangerous stick right away and could be one of the stronger second half rookies. In the minors last year, Alonso swatted 36 homers and drove in 119 runners in just 478 at-bats.
26 Miguel Sano (MIN - 1B,3B,DH) DL10 269 12 39 27.1 3.7 269.0
Sano, who has never recorded 500 plate appearances in a big league season, is unlikely to reach that mark in 2019. After injuring his heel during the offseason, he's not expected to be ready until May, at the earliest. There's still the matter of him hitting .199/.281/.398 with a 38.5% strikeout rate last season. While he makes too much hard contact to again bat below the Mendoza line, all the punchouts make him unlikely to climb much higher than his career .244 clip. Because of these holes, drafters should be able to stash a 25-year-old with a high walk rate and top-shelf power on the cheap. Only take him in five-by-five drafts if needing power and getting a steep discount.
27 Adam Jones (ARI - CF,DH) 267 16 41 27.9 3.6 312.0 +45.0
Steven Souza's season-ending knee surgery will likely clear up a starting spot for Jones, who still hit .281 with 15 homers in a down 2018. The durable veteran has averaged 151 games played over the past nine seasons, and he had gone seven straight seasons with at least 25 long balls before last year's decline. He's a boring depth piece who can help fill an injury void in deep leagues.
28 Kendrys Morales (OAK - 1B,DH) 290 15 36 29.2 2.8 449.0 +159.0
 
29 Francisco Mejia (SD - C,DH) 303 21 42 29.4 4.2 223.0 -80.0
Much of Mejia's production will depend on where he plays this season. The Padres are among the front-runners to land J.T. Realmuto, which oddly enough, would help Mejia a great deal. As it is now, the catching prospect is stuck behind Austin Hedges, who is among the top defensive catchers in baseball, but a trade to Miami, or perhaps even Cleveland or Cincinnati, would make him a fringe top 12 fantasy catcher right away. Mejia has more pop than your average catcher already and could eventually hit around .290 as his approach matures.
30 Jorge Soler (KC - RF,DH) 289 5 34 27.4 4.0 311.0 +22.0
 
31 Mark Trumbo (BAL - RF,DH) DL60 362 18 37 31.1 3.9 393.0 +31.0
 
32 Daniel Palka (CWS - LF,RF,DH) MiLB 328 20 43 29.6 3.6 335.0 +7.0
 
33 Jason Kipnis (CLE - 2B,CF,DH) 351 25 38 30.7 3.2 378.0 +27.0
Kipnis has been around forever and reached his peak long ago, but he is still just 32 years old and has plenty of baseball left in him. Unfortunately for fantasy owners, it will come without any speed or a quality batting average. Still, 20 homers and 70 RBIs will do the trick as a late-round pick.
34 Shohei Ohtani (LAA - SP,DH) DL10 207 2 62 32.3 11.7 171.0 -36.0
Regardless of how the league's host site manages the Ohtani dilemma, he'll only contribute as a hitter after undergoing Tommy John surgery last season. He won't be ready for Opening Day in that capacity either. The Japanese phenom exceeded expectations inside the batter's box, batting .285/.361/.564 with 22 homers and 10 steals (13 HRs and eight SBs over the final two months) in just 357 plate appearances. There's 30/15 potential, but enough health and playing-time concerns not to pay top dollar for it.
35 Albert Pujols (LAA - 1B,DH) 404 17 41 34.1 3.7 362.0 -42.0
 
36 Evan Gattis (DH) FA 425 9 42 32.3 6.1 479.0 +54.0
 
37 Ji-Man Choi (TB - DH) DTD 455 3 44 34.4 7.9 415.0 -40.0
 
38 Steven Duggar (SF - CF,RF,DH) 465 22 41 35.6 3.3 477.0 +12.0
 
39 Steve Pearce (BOS - 1B,LF,DH) 496 32 43 36.6 2.9 366.0 -130.0
 
40 Daniel Vogelbach (SEA - 1B,DH) 536 21 47 37.8 6.3 533.0 -3.0
 
41 Logan Morrison (NYY - 1B,DH) MiLB 689 33 50 40.5 4.4 836.0 +147.0
 
42 Curtis Granderson (MIA - LF,RF,DH) 539 25 42 38.7 3.1 821.0 +282.0
 
43 Hanley Ramirez (CLE - 1B,DH) DFA 726 18 51 42.2 5.7 549.0 -177.0
 
44 Tyler Austin (SF - 1B,DH) 541 32 48 41.0 3.3 626.0 +85.0
 
45 Jon Jay (CWS - LF,CF,RF,DH) DL10 681 32 47 42.4 3.1 719.0 +38.0
 
46 Matt Davidson (TEX - 1B,3B,DH) MiLB 586 32 45 41.7 2.6 694.0 +108.0
 
47 Blake Swihart (ARI - C,1B,LF,RF,DH) MiLB 656 34 49 42.8 3.9 372.0 -284.0
 
48 Robbie Grossman (OAK - LF,RF,DH) 607 31 46 41.8 3.2 783.0 +176.0
 
49 Pedro Alvarez (MIA - 3B,DH) NRI 1208 26 57 46.0 12.0    
 
50 Lucas Duda (KC - 1B,DH) 839 34 50 44.0 5.5 811.0 -28.0
 
51 Jose Briceno (LAA - C,DH) MiLB 709 37 52 44.5 5.3    
 
52 Brad Miller (1B,2B,SS,DH) FA 808 41 50 47.6 1.9 546.0 -262.0
 
53 Victor Reyes (DET - LF,RF,DH) MiLB 1014 44 51 48.2 2.3    
 
54 Rajai Davis (NYM - LF,CF,DH) NRI 1273 45 54 50.6 3.3 654.0 -619.0
 
55 Jose Rondon (CWS - 2B,SS,DH) 1190 47 54 51.0 2.9    
 
56 Cheslor Cuthbert (KC - 1B,3B,DH) MiLB 1290 49 58 54.0 3.7    
 
57 Isaac Galloway (MIA - CF,DH) 1292 50 56 54.0 2.8    
 
58 Terrance Gore (KC - LF,DH) 1294 51 57 54.3 2.5 567.0 -727.0