2019 Fantasy Baseball Rankings

Expert Consensus Ranking (54 of 56 Experts) -
Rank Player (Team, Position) Overall Notes
1 Mike Trout (LAA - CF,DH) 1 1 2 1.0 0.2 1.0
Trout only played 140 games in 2018 due to a brief DL stint, but he still finished as the eighth-most valuable hitter in standard 5x5 leagues. It was the second straight season Trout missed time with injuries, but that is just about the only fault you can find in his fantasy game. Consistently excellent when he's on the field, expect him to once again approach 40 HRs with 20+ steals and a batting average over .300.
2 Mookie Betts (BOS - CF,RF) 2 1 24 2.2 1.5 2.0
Following a down 2017, Betts became the first player since 2012 (Mike Trout and Ryan Braun) to hit .300 with 30 home runs and steals apiece. The career .303/.370/.518 hitter is averaging 29 homers, 27 steals, 117 runs, and 98 RBI over the past three years, upping his walk and hard-hit rates each step of the way. While last season's .346/.438/.640 slash line will be borderline impossible to fully sustain, a .430 wOBA (tied with Trout for MLB's lead) indicates limited regression. He's a five-category phenom who should lock down the second spot behind Trout in all formats.
3 Nolan Arenado (COL - 3B) 3 3 10 4.6 1.6 6.0 +3.0
When it comes to elite production that you can bank on year in and year out, look no further than Arenado. Some people will quibble that his lack of steals makes him a four-category player, but that hasn't stopped Arenado from producing four straight seasons as a top-10 overall hitter in standard 5x5 leagues. The only other knock on Arenado is that he is much better in the thin air of Coors Field, but fresh off a record-breaking contract extension, fantasy owners no longer need to worry about the possibility of a mid-season trade out of Colorado. You can write it down in marker that he will provide around 40 home runs, 100 runs, 110 RBIs, and a batting average in the .290 range, making Arenado a nice bargain at his average draft position (ADP) of 6.8.
4 J.D. Martinez (BOS - LF,RF,DH) 4 2 21 5.7 3.2 5.0 +1.0
There is no better bet in baseball to hit .300 with 40+ home runs than Martinez. He's now accomplished that feat two years in a row, hit at least 38 homers in three of the last four seasons, and hit over .300 in four of the last five. Still in the prime of his career and in a great hitting environment in Boston, a repeat performance looks likely.
5 Jose Ramirez (CLE - 2B,3B) 5 3 31 5.9 3.0 3.0 -2.0
Ramirez was the fourth-most valuable player in standard 5x5 leagues last season, according to Baseball Monster, trailing only J.D. Martinez, Christian Yelich, and Mookie Betts. And that was with a .270 batting average that was 15 points below Ramirez's career .285 mark, due to an abnormally low .252 batting average on balls in play (BABIP). While Ramirez's average is very likely to rise, his career-high 39 home runs and 34 stolen bases are should go in the opposite direction. Still, we're talking about a player who can produce a 30-20 season with a plus batting average. It's hard to argue too much with his current ADP of third overall behind Mookie Betts and Mike Trout.
6 Trea Turner (WSH - SS) DL10 7 3 20 7.2 3.2 8.0 +1.0
Turner didn't break fantasy baseball the way some backers hoped, but 2017 was by no means a disappointment. His 43 steals ranked second behind Whit Merrifield, and his pop properly prorated to 16 homers over 162 games. As arguably the biggest knock against him last spring, simply playing a full season marked a huge step toward trusting the shortstop as a first-round investment. A .271 batting average blocked a true ascent into top-tier territory. Yet the career .289 hitter improved his contact (81.7%) and walk (9.3%) rates, so he should earn more opportunities to run. Turner still merits a top-10 distinction in five-by-five roto leagues.
7 Christian Yelich (MIL - LF,CF,RF) 8 3 23 7.7 3.1 7.0 -1.0
Anyone sick of hearing about launch angle will relish Yelich's MVP campaign. Sure, the career .297/.375/.463 hitter has proven capable of hitting for a high average with above-average power despite his lofty ground-ball rates. But 35% of his fly balls cleared the fences for his 36 home runs. No other qualified hitter posted a HR/FB% above 30. He's more likely to hit 25-30 homers, which is still great if he can swipe around 20 more bags for the Brewers. There's enough five-category goodness to keep him in the first round, but also enough regression concern to push him toward the latter half of it.
8 Ronald Acuna Jr. (ATL - LF,CF) 9 1 21 8.8 4.0 9.0
Talk about a debut. At just 20 years old, Acuna performed like a seasoned fantasy star, producing 26 HRs, 16 SBs, and a .293 average across his first 111 Big League games. Some batting average regression could be coming his way following last year's high BABIP and strikeout rate, but then again Acuna whiffed much less in the second half, so perhaps he's already made an adjustment that can make him a consistent batting average asset. Acuna trailed only Mookie Betts, Christian Yelich, J.D. Martinez, and Mike Trout in per game value in standard roto/categories leagues, and barring a sophomore slump, he should once again be a top-five outfielder.
9 Bryce Harper (PHI - CF,RF) 12 2 25 11.3 3.4 16.0 +4.0
A wide dissonance remains from what drafters want from Harper and what he typically delivers. With batting averages of .330, .243, .319, and .249 over the last four years, there's a steep range of outcomes for a perennial top pick averaging 32 homers and 11 steals in that stretch. His latest drop came with a career-low 70.8% contact rate, so count on a compromise to around .270 rather than a full rebound. Now that he has signed with the Phillies, he should belt closer to 35-40 long balls with the help of Citizens Bank Park. The ideal landing spot pushes him up to early second-round territory, and it wouldn't be surprising to see some drafters grab him late in the first.
10 Jose Altuve (HOU - 2B) 13 3 35 12.2 5.1 14.0 +1.0
Last year's consensus No. 2 pick, Altuve stumbled to just 13 homers and 17 steals in 137 games. Despite the down year, drafters should pounce if the 2017 AL MVP falls into the second round. He was batting .342 through June before a knee injury interfered, eventually forcing the first DL appearance of his career. After an offseason to heal, he should veer closer to 20-homer, 25-steal form with a sky-high average and plenty of scoring output in Houston's star-studded lineup.
11 Aaron Judge (NYY - RF,DH) DL10 14 3 29 12.4 3.9 15.0 +1.0
After scorching a rookie-record 52 homers in 52, Judge settled for 27 in 498 plate appearances last season. Yet a feared average regression never materialized, as he batted .278 despite posting a 30.5 strikeout %. He led all hitters in average exit velocity (94.7 mph) with the highest % of batted balls hit a least 95 mph (54.1), so don't make the mistake of expecting a regressed BABIP to ruin his average. He might have peaked right out of the gate, but Judge should at least settle into 35-40 homers with a handful of steals if last year's oblique injuries don't resurface.
12 Alex Bregman (HOU - 3B,SS) 15 4 22 12.9 4.1 13.0 -2.0
Bregman's superstar ascension featured a stellar .286/.394/.532 slash line, 32 homers, and more walks (96) than strikeouts (85). He finished among the top five in contact, outside-swing, and swinging-strike rates, so the elite plate approach could feasibly net a .300 average in 2019. Yet a .463 xSLG suggests he hit his power ceiling, which is concerning considering the drop in steals (10). Drafters now must also monitor his progress from offseason arthroscopic surgery on his elbow, making Bregman a dicey proposition in the first round.
13 Manny Machado (SD - 3B,SS) 16 7 160 13.8 4.5 17.0 +1.0
Along with setting personal highs in each element of his .297/.367/.538 slash line, Machado bashed 37 homers and stole 14 bases, a significant development since he stole none in 2016. He has hit 33 homers in at least 690 plate appearances in each of the last four seasons, so he'd probably be considered a first-round lock if not for remaining unsigned. Now that he established 2017's funk as the clear outlier, Machado is a trustworthy stud eligible for shortstop and third (16 games) in most formats. Signing the Padres doesn't kill his worth, but he's someone to target near the Round ½ turn rather than inside the top 10.
14 Trevor Story (COL - SS) 17 4 25 14.1 3.8 20.0 +3.0
Story bounced back from a wretched 2017 and improved upon 2016's breakout. Slicing his strikeout rate from 34.4 to 25.6% helped him bat .291, and he stole 27 bases (19 more than his previous career high) alongside 37 long balls. A full repeat would make him an easy first rounder, but his contact skills still don't support such a high batting average. Statcast's .261 xAVG agrees. He's still a shortstop who calls Coors Field home, and regression could still offer 30/20 campaign, so don't shy away since the late-second round price accounts for these concerns.
15 Giancarlo Stanton (NYY - LF,RF,DH) DL10 18 4 29 14.3 4.2 22.0 +4.0
Stanton's ISO dropped .107 points, and he was still pretty good. Spoiled Yankees fans got antsy all 211 times he struck out, but the star slugger still smashed 38 homers with a .360 wOBA. After spending years worrying about his health, it was encouraging to see him play 158 games (mostly at DH), which allowed him to compile 100 RBI and 102 runs in a stacked lineup. He gave back most of 2017's contact gains, so expect a batting average closer to 2018's .266. Now that durability isn't a pressing concern, that's good enough for drafters to take his bankable power-even if we're talking 40 instead of 60 homers-to close out the second round.
16 Freddie Freeman (ATL - 1B) 20 7 25 16.4 3.6 23.0 +3.0
Replacing Joey Votto as the line-drive king, Freeman has batted above .300 with a slugging percentage over .500 in each of the last three seasons. He played all 162 games and even poached a career-high 10 bases in 2018. He'd be fantasy's undisputed top first baseman if not for a late power outage limiting him to 23 homers. Now he's simply competing with Paul Goldschmidt for top billing as second-round mainstays. Now that he has slowly repealed the injury-prone label, Freeman is a relatively safe pick with MVP upside.
17 Paul Goldschmidt (STL - 1B) 19 10 31 16.4 3.0 19.0
Whatever happened in May, Goldschmidt remedied it. After batting .144/.252/.278 in the worst month of the career, he then hit .330/.420/.602 with 26 of his 33 homers. He still batted .290-his lowest average since 2012-with 33 homers and a .390 wOBA. Now stationed behind bat walks machine Matt Carpenter in St. Louis, the durable veteran makes a sturdy second-round selection who could return first-round value by reviving gaudy stolen-base tallies of years' past.
18 Javier Baez (CHC - 2B,3B,SS) 22 6 33 17.8 5.6 18.0 -4.0
Despite recording the second-worst swinging strike (18.2%) and outside-swing (45.5%) rates, Baez managed to hit .290. Among 17 hitters with a contact rate of 70.0% or lower in at least 300 plate appearances, Aaron Judge was the only one besides Baez to bat above .266. That's a better baseline for 2019. Given his middling 4.5 walk %, he might not reach base enough to steal another 21 bases. Don't pay full freight for an encore.
19 Charlie Blackmon (COL - CF) 23 5 31 18.1 4.8 26.0 +3.0
Blackmon's down year (.291, 29 HR, 119 R, 12 SB) was still far better than most players' best year. Nevertheless, 2017's 37 homers now looks like the clear outlier for a 32-year-old yet to reach 30 in another season. He has also stolen fewer bases in each of the last three seasons. Yet this is still someone who has logged over 640 plate appearances and hit at least .287 in each of his five full seasons as an everyday starter. Nobody has scored more runs (542) during that timeframe, and he's no longer a flight risk after signing an extension through 2023 with the Rockies. Blackmon remains an elite stat-stuffer with little downside as a borderline top-25 pick.
20 Francisco Lindor (CLE - SS) 27 3 98 21.3 12.4 12.0 -15.0
Coming off a tremendous season, Lindor would arguably deserve to be in a tier of his own at shortstop if he hadn't suffered a strained calf in early February. As it is, he falls into a similar category of player as Javier Baez and Trevor Story: shortstops coming off of 30-20 seasons who have sky-high upside but also a bit of risk. The concern for Lindor is that he misses the beginning of the season and/or doesn't run as much upon his return, but the good news is that he was so good last year that they can afford to drop off a bit and still remain an elite fantasy option.
21 Andrew Benintendi (BOS - LF,CF) 26 12 54 21.4 3.3 29.0 +3.0
Great in every category but not spectacular in one, a player of Benintendi's ilk typically doesn't merit top-25 consideration. But 20/20 candidates are hard to come by, especially if they provide a high batting-average floor and can score 100 times atop a loaded Red Sox lineup. The 24-year-old also might not have peaked yet, as he has improved his strikeout and walk rates each season. While he offers a relatively safe profile, this possible upside forces drafters to pay a steep price to snag him around the Round 2/3 turn.
22 Kris Bryant (CHC - 3B,RF) 28 6 37 22.5 5.7 33.0 +5.0
Everyone kept waiting for Bryant to turn the corner last season. They're still waiting. He hit a pedestrian .272/.374/.460 and continued a concerning power slide with 13 homers. The former MVP, who is only 27, was dealing with a shoulder injury. He could easily bounce back and deliver near first-round value, but drafters won't receive much of a discount at his third-round going rate. It's a fair price given his batting average and power upside, but the lack of speed and health certainty makes him far from a lock.
23 Juan Soto (WSH - LF) 30 10 38 23.3 4.6 30.0
Expected to play at least one more full season in the minors, Soto instead showed elite skills beyond his years, batting .292/.406/.517 at age 19. After popping 22 homers in 494 plate appearance, supporters are dreaming of a .300, 30-homer, 10-steal breakout. It will happen soon enough, but don't reach for those lofty expectations in 2019. A 53.7% ground-ball rate dampens his power prospects, especially since nearly a quarter of his fly balls went yard last season. If his top-30 ECR holds, drafters are likely overpaying for a 25-homer, five-steal hitter who should be going closer to Anthony Rendon than Andrew Benintendi.
24 Anthony Rizzo (CHC - 1B) 31 17 34 23.3 2.6 34.0 +3.0
For the first time since 2014, Rizzo fell short of 30 homers (25) and a .500 slugging percentage (.470). An atrocious April in which he batted .149 with one extra-base hit is entirely to blame. He hit his fewest fly balls (37.3%) since 2012, but the accompanying career bests in contact (85.1%), strikeout (12.0%) and line-drive (24.7%) rate did not show fully in his .283 average. Either he sustains these profile changes and inches closer to batting .300, or he regains enough of his power stroke to leap back to 30 long balls. Or both. Either way, Rizzo, who batted .303/.393/.512 after an atrocious April, is a sturdy foundational piece worth grabbing in the third or fourth round.
25 Starling Marte (PIT - CF) DL10 32 11 71 25.7 6.3 37.0 +5.0
The only players to bat at least .275 with 20 homers and 30 steals last season: Mookie Betts and Starling Marte. Lower the steals query to 20, and they're joined by Mike Trout, Francisco Lindor, Christian Yelich, Trevor Story, and Javier Baez. Only one of those guys frequently lasts beyond the third round. Marte will struggle to repeat that career-high in homers given his ground-ball tendencies, but he has swiped at least 30 bags in each of his last five full seasons. (He stole 21 in 77 games in 2017.) Don't worry too much about his poor walk rate in five-by-five leagues.
26 Rhys Hoskins (PHI - 1B,LF) 36 7 51 28.3 4.7 38.0 +2.0
Hoskins has plenty of power, as evidenced by his 52 homers in just 728 career at-bats, but his career batting average now sits at .249. There will surely be plenty or runs and RBIs once again, but there isn't much value in grabbing him during any of the first five rounds.
27 Anthony Rendon (WSH - 3B) DTD 37 19 56 30.1 6.6 41.0 +4.0
Diminishing speed and non-elite power make Rendon boring, but he's still a tremendous hitter who has batted above .300 and slugged over .500 in each of the last two seasons. After missing time with a bruised toe earlier in 2018, he posted a .391 wOBA (a mark matched by Jose Ramirez and Nolan Arenado all season) since the start of June. Stealing twice in three tries is a major bummer, but don't underestimate the worth of a .300, 25-homer hitter who could offer 90-100 runs and RBI apiece in the heart of Washington's lineup.
28 Khris Davis (OAK - LF,DH) 38 19 57 30.4 7.4 42.0 +4.0
Davis' consistently extends his uncanny streak of batting .247 in four straight seasons. He's also the only player to deposit at least 40 homers in each of the last three seasons. MLB's league-wide batting average dipped to .248 last season, so Oakland's slugger won't torpedo that category. And while power is now easier to find later in drafts, elite power remains a major asset. Having only played 11 games in the outfield, he won't have a position in some leagues. That utility-only label could turn him into a value, as drafters are needlessly reticent of taking such players.
29 Whit Merrifield (KC - 1B,2B,CF,RF,DH) 39 19 119 30.8 9.8 32.0 -7.0
Merrifield not only absconded an MLB-high 45 steals but also batted .304 with 12 homers and 43 doubles. That's borderline extinct skill set justifies his spot as an upper-echelon pick, but beware some regression. His batting average rose despite modest drops in contact and strikeout rates, and no speedster should hold a 14.7% infield-fly rate. Still, there aren't many .280, 12-35 hitters either.
30 Cody Bellinger (LAD - 1B,CF) 41 16 49 32.0 5.7 39.0 -2.0
In 162 games and 84 more plate appearances than in his spectacular arrival, Bellinger hit 14 fewer home runs (25) while his ISO dropped from .315 to .210. On the bright side, he avoided significant batting-average regression by hitting .260 with a diminished strikeout rate (23.9%). The 23-year-old maintains more than enough raw power to jump back to 30 long balls, but don't overlook his 14 steals in 15 tries. This isn't a mere case of catching opponents off guard, as the 6'4" stud recorded a higher Statcast speed score (28.9) than Jose Peraza, Tim Anderson, and Ozzie Albies. He's a 30-15 candidate with upside for more, so don't let him fall too far beyond the fourth round.
31 Xander Bogaerts (BOS - SS) 42 17 64 32.6 6.4 45.0 +3.0
Other elite shortstop peers have passed Bogaerts by, but he rebounded from a 2017 mired by a wrist injury to hit a quiet .288/.360/.522 with 23 homers and 103 RBI. He set career-highs in walks, hard-hit rate, barrels, and launch angle in his age-25 season, so drafters should believe in his power surge. This is the player everyone has wanted for years, but the five-category contributor-swinging in the heart of a loaded lineup-will slip to the fourth or fifth round due to a lack of elite power and speed.
32 George Springer (HOU - CF,RF,DH) 43 12 54 34.8 7.1 48.0 +5.0
It was a rough year for Springer Dingers, as the Astros outfielder deposited just 22 homers with a pedestrian .265/.346/.434 slash line. Thumb and quad injuries sapped his power late in the season and limited him to 140 games for the second straight year, and yet he managed over 100 runs for the third consecutive campaign. Caught stealing 21 times in 41 times, he's no longer a steals asset. He's looking more like a floor compiler who could underwhelm without a return to roughly 30 dingers.
33 Carlos Correa (HOU - SS) 44 14 76 35.3 10.0 44.0
Injuries have limited Correa to 109 and 110 games over the last two seasons, respectively. He stole five bases combined and saw his wOBA plummet from .394 to .313, which was even higher than his .306 xwOBA. Because of his age (24) and instant success upon reaching the majors, there's little discount after the down year. He's too risky in the top-three rounds, but it's hard to ignore the MVP upside if he slips.
34 Adalberto Mondesi (KC - 2B,SS) 46 16 131 39.3 14.4 43.0 -3.0
If you pro-rate Mondesi's 75 games to a full season, it comes out to 30 homers, 68 steals and 100 RBIs. I don't need to tell you that a season like that would put him above Mike Trout from a fantasy perspective. Granted, he is due for some regression, but don't hesitate to reach several rounds to get him on your roster.
35 Eugenio Suarez (CIN - 3B) 47 28 65 40.3 9.3 55.0 +8.0
One of the game's most underappreciated stars, Suarez leveraged a massive hard-hit uptick into a career-high 34 homers. Yet his fly-ball rate (37.1%) stayed exactly the same as 2017, when he circled the bases 26 times. He's likely to split the difference, and a subpar second half (.245/.322/.463) will only fuel more skepticism. Yet it'd be foolish to ignore the other MVP-caliber half (.312/.399/.574). The 27-year-old third baseman could still offer a .275 average with around 30 homers and strong counting numbers around pick 50.
36 Joey Votto (CIN - 1B) DTD 48 22 85 40.9 10.5 52.0 +4.0
Votto, now 35 years old, hit 12 homers last year after clubbing 36 in 2017. At least he maintained his stellar plate approach, tallying more walks (108) than strikeouts (101) while lacing MLB's second-highest line-drive rate (31.4%) behind Freddie Freeman. While still a commendable performer in OBP and points leagues, he'll need a power uptick to justify an early investment in roto and H2H category formats. A modest rise in last year's career-low 9.5% HR/FB rate should at least steer him closer to his .477 xSLG with 20-25 homers. That would make him a worthy bounce-back pick if paired with anything near his career .311 batting average.
37 Jean Segura (PHI - SS) DL10 49 28 71 42.3 8.2 64.0 +15.0
After hitting .300 with 11 homers and 22 steals in 2017, Segura was undervalued in 2018 drafts. He followed up the useful decline from 2016's breakout by batting .304 with 10 homers and 20 steals last season. He's undervalued again. Of the 28 players who stole at least 20 bases in 2018, only 10 hit over .280. Moving to Citizens Bank Park could help him smack a few more long balls and potentially score another 90-plus runs if batting high in a replenished lineup. Simply repeating recent performance would make him worth a look anywhere outside the top-50 picks in 5x5 roto formats.
38 Lorenzo Cain (MIL - CF) 50 27 74 42.8 10.6 63.0 +13.0
In the past five years, Cain is one of only 15 players averaging a .300 batting average, and among them, he is 2nd behind only Jose Altuve with 126 steals. There isn't much in the way of power, but you can bank on him contributing in all five categories with plenty of durablity.
39 Nelson Cruz (MIN - DH) 53 4 71 42.9 9.2 91.0 +38.0
Cruz has seen his batting average fall from .302 slowly down to .256 over the last four seasons, but the homers and RBIs are still firmly among the top of the league even despite his advanced again. You can rely on his durability and power in 2019 so don't hesitate to grab him in the 6th or 7th round.
40 Ozzie Albies (ATL - 2B) 51 27 68 43.2 8.6 57.0 +6.0
Albies is dripping with potential and there is no denying that after his 20 homer first half with 9 steals. With that said, his second half was dreadful, batting .226 with just 4 bombs. There is a chance he returns first round value, but the downside would torch your team if he returns to second half form.
41 Jose Abreu (CWS - 1B,DH) 52 30 67 43.8 7.8 74.0 +22.0
The always reliable Abreu fell short of a .290 batting average (.265) and 100 RBI (78) for the first time in his five-year MLB tenure. Just as he was kicking into high gear in August (.338/.380/.676), a thigh injury ended his season early. His .294 BABIP plummeted below his .329 career norm without any accompanying dips in contact and strikeouts, so it's easy envisioning an average rebound to at least .280. Although he may not return to 30 homers, he shouldn't miss by much if healthy. This could be a chance to buy a steady producer at a discount.
42 Yasiel Puig (CIN - RF) 56 24 108 44.4 13.3 76.0 +20.0
Puig has become every drafter's friend since getting shipped from the Dodgers to Reds. Although never matching the immediate high of his story-book debut, the outfielder has registered a .349 wOBA and 15 stolen bases in each of the last two seasons. Escaping the NL West juggernaut's jammed roster solidifies ample playing time, and he changes venues to one of baseball's best hitter's parks. Most projection systems forecast around 25-30 home runs with 12-16 steals while batting in the .270 vicinity. Those numbers would satisfy drafters who dip into the top 100 to snag an increasingly popular target.
43 Daniel Murphy (COL - 1B,2B) DL10 57 21 92 44.5 10.4 67.0 +10.0
Murphy's draft stock hasn't soared nearly enough for a career .299/.344/.458 hitter moving to Coors Field. One of baseball's top sluggers in 2016 and 2017, his 2018 returns were contaminated by a brutal return from offseason knee injury. From July 1 onward, removing 15 games from his 91-game season, he batted .317/.355/.493 with 12 homers. Steamer's projected .307 average and 22 homers seem more than reasonable with the Rockies, and he's capable of bringing home another batting title.
44 Tommy Pham (TB - LF,CF) 58 24 82 45.1 11.6 72.0 +14.0
Despite batting .248/.331/.399 with a .323 wOBA prior to the Cardinals trading him, Pham's .283 xBA and .364 xwOBA called for a rebound. He did just that and more, going .343/.448/.622 In 39 games with the Rays. Put it all together, and he was one of eight hitters to hit at least .275 with 20 homers and 15 steals. There's room for more across the board, as he recorded MLB's third-best hard-hit rate (48.5%) last season and poached 25 bags in 2017.
45 Marcell Ozuna (STL - LF) 62 24 86 46.0 11.4 75.0 +13.0
Ozuna may have taken a huge step back last year, but even so, he put up 23 homers, 88 RBIs and a .280 batting average while playing with a significant shoulder injury. We don't know yet whether or not he will be ready to go on opening day, but assuming health, we might be closer to the 37 HR, 124 RBIs, and .312 BA we got from Ozuna in 2017.
46 Eddie Rosario (MIN - LF) 60 28 76 47.1 10.2 80.0 +20.0
Rosario has been remarkably consistent the past two years with a .290 and .288 batting average, 27 and 24 homers, 78 and 77 RBIs and 9 and 8 steals. Expect much of the same from him again this season, making him worthy of a 6th round pick in standard leagues.
47 Corey Seager (LAD - SS) 63 27 98 48.8 12.4 69.0 +6.0
After undergoing season-ending Tommy John surgery, Seager also had arthroscopic surgery on his hip in August. He's optimistic about his Opening Day availability, but drafters are still proceeding with caution. It doesn't help that he has never offered more than 26 homers or four steals in a single season. Let's not forget, however, that the 24-year-old shortstop is a career .302/.374/.494 hitter. There's plenty of profit potential if he returns healthy.
48 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (TOR - 3B) MiLB 65 16 85 50.7 12.8 53.0 -12.0
Guerrero profiles as a future superstar. He was unstoppable across four minor league levels last season, hitting .381 with 20 home runs in just 95 games. The projection systems universally expect him to rake from day one in the Major Leagues, envisioning that he is capable of hitting close to .300 with 20-25 home runs even while missing the first few weeks of the season due to service time considerations. He won't be good for more than a handful of stolen bases, but that hardly matters for a player who could someday soon lead the league in both batting average and home runs.
49 J.T. Realmuto (PHI - C,1B) 67 23 107 52.7 13.8 46.0 -21.0
Realmuto doesn't possess the pure upside of Gary Sanchez, but he may still be the better pick in fantasy drafts. In moving from Miami to Philadelphia, he gets a massive upgrade in both his home ballpark and supporting cast, setting him up to establish new career highs in the counting stats (HR, RBIs, runs). Realmuto is also a good bet to lead all catchers in plate appearances, thanks to both his durability and the possibility that he sees the occasional start at first base when he isn't behind the plate.
50 Gleyber Torres (NYY - 2B,SS) 70 32 99 54.1 12.2 61.0 -9.0
Torres isn't a big contributor in stolen bases, but he is plenty useful in each of the other four main categories. If you expand his rates out to a full season, Torres would have posted 32 homers, 101 RBIs and a .271 batting average. You would be thrilled to get that type of production out of your seventh round shortstop.
51 Matt Carpenter (STL - 1B,2B,3B) 72 12 100 54.6 15.3 65.0 -7.0
Despite entering the season with health woes and batting .155 in April, Carpenter then went scorched earth to hit .257/.374/.523 with a career-high 36 homers. It's dicey to bet on a 33-year-old coming off a career year, but he simply punishes baseball too severely to discredit. He led qualified hitters in hard-hit rate (49.0%) with the fifth-highest fly-ball rate (46.9%) and fourth-lowest popup rate (2.1%). Given his elite blend of hitting the ball hard, high, and far, Statcast's .535 XSLG and .386 xwOBA even offer room for growth. Expect more elite power in 2019.
52 Mitch Haniger (SEA - CF,RF) 71 38 84 54.8 8.9 83.0 +12.0
Although Haniger hasn't done it for as long as someone like Nelson Cruz or Justin Upton, he was better than both last year thanks to a .285 batting average on top of his 90+ runs, 90+ RBIs and power. Projection models are fond of him once again this year, but there is a bit more risk than the aforementioned annual powerhouses.
53 Nicholas Castellanos (DET - RF) 75 35 88 56.4 10.4 90.0 +15.0
Castellanos was a disappointment for so long that it may still be hanging over his stock. The fact of the matter, however, is that he has been great the past two season, hitting .285 with 49 homers and 190 RBIs. He only qualifies as an outfielder now, but should be regarded every bit as high as someone like Justin Upton or Mitch Haniger.
54 Gary Sanchez (NYY - C,DH) DL10 79 25 116 58.8 16.3 51.0 -28.0
There is no getting past the fact that Sanchez was a train wreck last season., batting .186 with only 18 homers. With that said, he is still just 26 years old and we are talking about the fastest player to ever reach 50 homers in the MLB. Chance are high that he will bounce back in the batting average department, and if he can stay healthy, bank on 25 to 40 homers making him well worth a 7th or 8th round pick.
55 Joey Gallo (TEX - 1B,LF,CF,RF) 81 30 107 59.3 15.0 99.0 +18.0
Barring a ton of good fortune, drafters should no longer draft Gallo hoping for a spike to even a .230 batting average. With MLB's worst contact rate last season (61.7%), it's no guarantee the career .203 hitter clears the Mendoza Line. He also, however, joined J.D. Martinez and Khris Davis as the only sluggers to belt 40 homers in each of the last two years. It will take a precise roster to tolerate the average liability in applicable leagues, but he's a much better investment in OBP, OPS and/or points leagues.
56 David Dahl (COL - LF,CF,RF) 82 37 104 59.7 13.4 95.0 +13.0
*In best Jerry Seinfeld voice* What's the Dahl with David's rising ADP? He's a top-100 choice in most spots after popping nine homers in September. Although he could easily offer 25 homers and 15 steals with a Coors-inflated batting average, investors must be willing to absorb some additional matchup homework. He recorded a .378 wOBA against righties and a .296 wOBA versus lefties, and even those steep splits are nothing compared to his .435 wOBA at home compared to a .254 wOBA on the road. This could make him trickier to own in leagues with weekly lineups.
57 Michael Conforto (NYM - LF,CF,RF) 80 31 85 59.9 12.2 106.0 +26.0
Although he returned sooner than expected from shoulder surgery, perhaps Conforto needed more recovery time. He entered the All-Star break batting .216 with a .366 slugging percentage. On the strength of nine September homers, he closed the second half by hitting .273 with a .539 slugging clip. He proved capable of handling fellow lefties (.345 wOBA) and finished a seemingly lost year with 28 long balls. Now healthy and ready for Opening Day, Conforto is a strong bet for 30 homers with a higher batting average if he regains past hard-hit standards prior to injuring his shoulder. This could be the last chance to snag him at a discount.
58 Justin Turner (LAD - 3B) 84 36 131 60.3 12.4 88.0 +4.0
Batting average is difficult to come by after the first four or five rounds, but then there is Turner, who over the last five seasons, has racked up a .305 batting average which beats out plays like Trout, Yelich and Freeman. There isn't a ton in the way of homers or steals, but he won't hurt you in any category unless he deals with yet another injury. For that reason, he is a bit risky.
59 Jesus Aguilar (MIL - 1B) 83 28 192 60.4 16.0 78.0 -5.0
Aguilar's breakout may have seemed to come out of nowhere, but it was only the playing time that was particularly surprising. After slugging .505 in a short-end platoon role in 2017, he supplanted Eric Thames to pop 35 homers with a 134 wRC+ in a full-time role. All the hard hits and a high launch angle say the power is legit, but his contract skills don't support a .274 hitter. Drafters are naturally dubious of playing for a late bloomer's career year, but Milwaukee's starting first baseman shouldn't fall off a cliff entirely. He should at least remain good for a .250, 30-homer campaign.
60 Justin Upton (LAA - LF,DH) DL10 86 33 121 61.3 17.7 94.0 +8.0
Upton is one of the only players with at least 30 homers in each of the last three seasons. You can also bank on 80+ RBIs and runs, and while his stolen bases have come down over the years, 10 is a good bet once again. Upton's batting average won't help you, but it should be enough to warrant a sixth round pick in standard leagues.
61 A.J. Pollock (LAD - CF) 87 41 111 64.5 11.1 92.0 +5.0
Prior to yet another injury, Pollock was among the best fantasy assets in baseball. He had 12 homers, 9 steals and 38 RBIs through just 186 at bats. The ceiling for Pollock is a 30/20 player with a batting average near .300, but he has only played more than 115 games just twice in his career so don't forget about the risk in drafting him.
62 Andrew McCutchen (PHI - LF,RF) 88 31 91 64.6 12.2 130.0 +42.0
McCutchen might not be that first round pick he once was when we were getting 30 homers, 20 steals and a .320 batting average, but he is still a plenty capable fantasy asset. He is as durable as they come and has managed 20+ homers in 8 straight seasons. Not only that. but he still steals double-digit bags per year and is moving into by far the best ballpark of his career so don't be surprised if we get a resurgence.
63 Matt Chapman (OAK - 3B) 89 29 103 65.7 10.0 103.0 +14.0
Although he underwent offseason surgery, Chapman is expected to be ready by Oakland's season opener in Tokyo on March 20. Fantasy investors don't reap the rewards of his Gold Glove at third, and typical five-by-five gamers didn't fully benefit from his 42 doubles. Yet those strengths led to a steadfast starting role and 100 runs scored. Having towered as many as 36 homers in a minor league season, he could expand upon last season's 23. He also make quiet contact gains to support his .278 batting average, so even if Chapman doesn't take another step further, he also won't regress as much as most projections expect.
64 Travis Shaw (MIL - 1B,3B,2B) 90 44 121 65.7 12.2 97.0 +7.0
Shaw followed 2017's 31-homer breakout with one more last year, but his 10 steals sliced in half while his average slithered from .273 to .241. That's a peculiar drop considering he also set career bests in walk (13.3%) and strikeout (18.4%) rates with a rise in barrels per batted balls (10.3%). Last year was the time to pass, but drafters should jump back in now that Shaw comes at a cheaper price with second-base eligibility.
65 Josh Donaldson (ATL - 3B,DH) 93 21 116 66.5 19.7 89.0 -4.0
Over the last two years, Donaldson has missed half of his team's games, but he has still be exceptional when he plays, with 41 homers, 101 RBIs and 95 runs in 165 games. If he is healthy, you've got a second round value, but that is a big if so proceed at your own risk.
66 Wil Myers (SD - 3B,LF,RF) 92 35 97 67.1 11.0 100.0 +8.0
Myers is commonly thought of as injury prone and last year's 79 missed games certainly doesn't help. With that said, he averages 23 homers and 20 steals over the last three years even despite last year's disappointing season. There is major upside here even though his batting average is almost certain to stay under .260 again.
67 Miguel Andujar (NYY - 3B,DH) DL10 95 46 110 62.1 11.9 79.0 -16.0
Right out of the gate, Andujar provided a rare blend of elite contact (.297 BA) and power (27 HRs) for the Yankees. A 4.1% walk rate is far from ideal, and atrocious defense at third base limits his real-life value. Neither flaw hurt his five-by-five worth last season, but beware paying the Yankee Tax on a youngster who may have peaked early. Statcast's .319 xwOBA hints at some potential sophomore regression.
68 Eloy Jimenez (CWS - LF,RF) 99 29 209 68.7 18.8 117.0 +18.0
Jimenez may not be Vlad Jr. but most other years, he would be the consensus top fantasy prospect. His game is in the mold of Manny Ramirez where he could be a mainstay in the middle of a lineup, hitting 30 homers with 100 RBIs and a .290 BA every year. That might not all come right away, but from the moment he is called up, you can expect a top 30 fantasy outfielder.
69 Rougned Odor (TEX - 2B,DH) DL10 100 40 123 70.2 16.3 133.0 +33.0
Odor settled for 18 homers in 129 games after offering 33 and 30 long balls in the last two seasons, respectively. Yet he made demonstrative improvements as an actual player, upping his wOBA from .272 to .325 and fWAR from -1.2 to 2.5. A more selective approach led to a career-high 8.0% walk rate and a respectable .253 batting average. He should at least rebound closer to 25 homers, but there's some concern that Texas throws up a red (or at least yellow) light after getting caught in half of his 24 steals attempts. He's still only 25, so it's worth the gamble beyond the top-100 picks if searching for a power-speed punch.
70 Robinson Cano (NYM - 2B) DTD 98 41 106 71.3 11.1 104.0 +6.0
Cano still has plenty left in the reserve. In a season sliced in half because of an 80-game PED suspension, the veteran second baseman batted .303/.374/.471 with 10 homers. While the elite power has dissipated, with 2016's 39 homers now looking like a clear outlier among recent returns, he has settled into a stable source of 20 long balls with a high average. Having earned his highest hard-hit rate and exit velocity over the last four seasons, Cano corralled the sixth-highest xBA (.305) of all MLB hitters with 250 plate appearances. He's a steady contributor going at a bargain because of old age.
71 Jose Peraza (CIN - SS) 103 34 100 72.6 11.6 109.0 +6.0
Peraza's steady skills came with a massive spike in contact (.288 BA) and power (14 HRs, 31 2Bs), turning a bit player into a significant five-by-five contributor. A rise in fly balls, hard hits, and launch angle accompanied the power boost, so he could reasonably reach double-digit homers again. His batting average has fluctuated sharply by year, so he's not quite a bankable star just yet. He is, however, a steady option with few 20-base stealers capable of also hitting .280 with 10 homers.
72 David Peralta (ARI - LF) 104 36 113 73.6 12.6 129.0 +25.0
Peralta batted .293 with a .352 OBP and 14 homers in 2017, but drafters snoozed at his bounce-back campaign. Last year, he batted .293 with a .352 OBP … and 30 homers. And yet he's still fighting for a top-100 spot. Having previously never gone deep more than 17 times in a season, it's safe to project regression given his 29.2% fly-ball rate. An elevated hard-hit rate at least gives him hope of reaching 20 homers, which would make him a useful contributor with a high floor in batting average.
73 Michael Brantley (HOU - LF,DH) 105 36 140 74.3 15.7 107.0 +2.0
Just as everyone gave up on the oft-injured Brantley, he returned from a significant ankle injury to bat .309/.364/.468 with 17 homers and 12 steals in 631 plate appearances. No qualified hitter made more contact (90.9%) than the 31-year-old outfielder, whose 9.5% strikeout rate finished second after Andrelton Simmons. His skill set is likely to get undervalued by drafters seeking flashier power or speed, and he could easily score 100+ runs in the Astros slot him atop their lineup. Health is the only concern.
74 Victor Robles (WSH - RF) 107 28 233 74.8 18.7 119.0 +12.0
If Alex Reyes doesn't make the Cardinals' rotation, Robles is far and away the favorite to win NL Rookie of the Year. Robles is a true five-tool talent that is polished enough to be a top 45 fantasy outfielder right away. The power may come a little later, but he will steal more than enough bases to warrant a mid-round pick.
75 Mike Moustakas (MIL - 3B,DH) DTD 108 37 107 76.4 15.0 139.0 +31.0
Moustakas rejoined the Brewers on his second straight one-year deal, so drafters might have missed their window to snag a power bat at a discount. He didn't fare any better with the Brewers (.256/.326/.441) than the Royals (.249/.309/.468), but a park and lineup upgrade should boost the third baseman's draft price. While the ultra-high launch angle limits his batting-average upside despite a career 15.6% strikeout rate, he'll broach another 30 long runs now that he's signed with time to get ready by Opening Day.
76 Jonathan Villar (BAL - 2B,SS) 111 39 111 71.6 16.8 87.0 -24.0
After getting shipped out of Milwaukee to Baltimore, Villar won some leagues down the stretch. In 54 games with his new club, the middle infielder batted .258 with eight homers and 21 steals. Like Adalberto Mondesi, he offers mouth-watering steals upside with a chance to also deliver 15-20 long balls. Unlike Mondesi, Villar can draw a walk. He also manifested this fantastical ceiling when batting .285 with 19 homers and 62 steals in 2016. Oh yeah, he's also much cheaper. A poor contact profile presents significant batting-average downside, but the speed makes him a tantalizing upside pick.
77 Dee Gordon (SEA - 2B,CF) 110 47 160 78.5 11.5 101.0 -9.0
Gordon is great at running, but not quite as good at reaching base. Despite the complete lack of power, his profile was palatable when consisting of a high average, plethora of runs, and 60 steals. Last season, however, he batted .268 with 62 runs and 30 steals. He was caught stealing (12) more times than he walked (nine), and the 30-year-old can't afford as many misfires with a .288 OBP. His Statcast speed score (29.0) didn't drop much from 2017 (29.0), so it's possible he bounces back to 40-45 steals if a few more dribbles roll his way. It's probably not worth the risk unless desperate for speed.
78 Edwin Encarnacion (SEA - 1B,DH) 114 45 140 79.9 21.2 113.0 -1.0
Even in a down year, Encarnacion topped 30 homers for the seventh straight season, a span during which 2014's 98 RBI was the only time he fell short of 100. That bankable power is comforting at his depreciating price, but career worsts in contact (75.7%) and strikeout (22.9%) rate led to his lowest average (.248) since 2010. The durable slugger also missed time with a biceps injury during his age-35 campaign, so don't reach for name recognition. That shouldn't be necessary, as ADPs beyond the top 100 suggest he could fall into your lap.
79 Rafael Devers (BOS - 3B) 117 47 129 80.0 14.1 142.0 +25.0
Let's remember that Devers is only 22, and his "bad" season still consisted of 21 homers in 490 plate appearances. Although his rapid rise stalled with a .240/.298/.433 slash line, he showed some growth down the stretch with a 10.6% walk rate and .227 ISO after the All-Star break. He has slimmed down during the offseason, so the former uber-prospect is more than capable of circling the bases 25-30 times with a higher batting average. If so, this will be the last time he's available this late.
80 Aaron Hicks (NYY - CF) DL10 130 53 143 83.2 19.5 132.0 +2.0
Hicks topped 500 plate appearances for the first time in his career in 2018, and rewarded the Yankees and fantasy owners with 27 home runs, 11 stolen bases, and 90 runs scored. Hicks' high walk rate makes him particularly valuable in OBP and points leagues, but he proved last year that he can be a solid second or third outfielder in standard 5x5 leagues if he can just stay healthy.
81 Nomar Mazara (TEX - RF) 126 47 148 83.9 15.2 153.0 +27.0
Having hit 20 homers in each of his first three MLB seasons, Mazara has yet to validate his high prospect pedigree as an above-average hitter. Drafters paying for upside instead keep receiving a boring compiler with a career .258/.320/.425 slash line. Last year, he needed a career-high 20.0% HR/FB rate on a career-low 26.6% FB rate just to reach his usual 20, half of which he notched in May. All of this points to a steady hand rather than an upside play, but Mazara only turns 24 in April. His upside hasn't expired just yet, but don't overpay for unfulfilled hype.
82 Max Muncy (LAD - 1B,2B,3B) 122 41 156 84.5 27.0 110.0 -12.0
Muncy had batted .195 with five homers in 245 big league plate appearances prior to 2018, so he naturally towered 35 homers with a .407 wOBA. He endured some troubling strikeout woes late in the season and playoffs, but there are plenty of reasons not to anticipate the bottom falling out entirely. Along with a gorgeous 16.4% walk rate, the late bloomer notched a heavy dosage of fly balls (44.9%, only 5.9% popups) and hard hits (47.4%). Per Statcast, only Joey Gallo served up a higher rate of barrels per batted balls than Muncy's 16.9. He's a solid power pick-and tremendous OBP target-if the rest of the room sees an obvious regression candidate.
83 Ender Inciarte (ATL - CF) 127 58 160 85.3 14.7 138.0 +11.0
Inciarte had a weird season. After stealing 13 bases through April, his final tally (28) felt like a letdown despite representing a career high. He also batted .265 after weaving averages of .303, .291, and .304 in the previous three seasons. Although little changed in his batted-ball profile, the Statcast data suggests more good fortune before than misfortune in 2018. Yet he's a career .289 hitter who consistently puts the ball in play, and there's a chance he leads off a Braves lineup boasting Ronald Acuna, Freddie Freeman, and Josh Donaldson. If landing and maintaining that slot, he's an immense bargain who can score 100 runs with 10 homers and 25-30 steals. Simply repeating last year's stats-with a couple of steals traded for a few average points-would make Inciarte a worthwhile depth piece at his early going rates.
84 Brian Dozier (WSH - 2B) 124 36 144 85.6 14.7 137.0 +13.0
It was a lost year for Dozier, and he still came out with 21 homers and 12 steals. That wasn't worth much when paired with a .215 batting average, but the second baseman said he was playing through a knee injury all season. In two seasons before the 2018 downturn, he hit .269 with a combined 76 blasts and 34 steals. Banking on a health-enabled rebound is an interesting risk for those who can risk a subpar average or play in an OBP/points league.
85 Mallex Smith (SEA - LF,CF,RF) 132 58 153 89.7 16.4 111.0 -21.0
One of last year's best sources of cheap speed, Smith stole the third-most bases (40) besides Whit Merrifield and Trea Turner. Among the 11 players with at least 30 steals, he was one of four (Merrifield, Mookie Betts, and Lorenzo Cain) to bat above .300 (.296). As a two-category contributor, he needs that average to stick, but a .249 xBA and Steamer's .263 projection aren't so optimistic. Yet the speed is legitimate, and the Mariners could slot him into the leadoff role. He could be a more competent Billy Hamilton.
86 Tim Anderson (CWS - SS) 138 32 127 90.2 16.2 135.0 -3.0
Anderson's .240 average? Meh. His .281 OBP? Gross. Twenty homers and 24 steals from a 25-year-old shortstop? Well, that's pretty good. A horrible real-life hitter, he can fill two of fantasy's most essential categories. After logging 606 plate appearances in each of the past two seasons, he appears in no danger of losing playing time for his ineffective bat. Be sure to have some high-average hitters in place before taking Anderson, and don't touch him in a points league.
87 Stephen Piscotty (OAK - RF) 136 55 127 91.4 11.7 154.0 +18.0
Piscotty waited to get dropped in most leagues before delivering a bounce-back season. After batting .160 in May, he hit .286 with 24 homers and a .386 wOBA (.365 wOBA) from June 1 onward. Given his down 2017 (.235, 9 HRs), drafters should seek a near repeat of 2018 rather than extrapolating his late surge to a full season. Last year's 27 homers already set a career high, so aim for 25 from a solid, mid-tier option.
88 Eric Hosmer (SD - 1B) 134 53 139 93.4 15.3 167.0 +33.0
The every-other-year curse once again struck Hosmer, who batted .253/.322/.398 with a 95 wRC+ and -0.1 fWAR to start an eight-year, $144 million contract with the Padres. He was the only qualified position player to post a negative launch angle (-1.2°), and only Ian Desmond hit more ground balls than his 60.4%. Not only did he make weaker contact, he made less of it with career lows in contact (74.7%) and strikeout (21.0%) rate. Before writing Hosmer off entirely, he has bounced back from terrible years before. Deep-league managers will at least derive value from a locked-in starter who has recorded at least 667 plate appearances in each of the last four seasons. If he falls far enough, he is an acceptable corner-infield compiler, especially now that he's batting alongside Manny Machado. Take a better hitter-it won't be hard to find one-in shallower formats.
89 Yoan Moncada (CWS - 2B) 145 30 194 94.0 16.5 157.0 +12.0
A low average (.235) disrupted by a 33.4% strikeout rate again blocked Moncada's leap to stardom. He'll need to improve his contact skills significantly to reach his superstar ceiling, but the hype has quickly fizzled for the elite talent capable of a massive breakthrough a la Javier Baez in 2018. Drafters, however, should only draft Moncada if willing to accept a potential .230-.240 hitter in hopes of getting 15-20 homers and steals apiece. The second baseman might gain another position, as the White Sox are preparing to try him out at third.
90 Yasmani Grandal (MIL - C) 144 58 174 95.2 17.0 115.0 -29.0
While the gut reaction to signing with the Brewers was to shoot him up the rankings, Grandal actually hit better at Dodger Stadium (.363 wOBA) than on the road (.341 last season). Rather than expecting a production spike, investors should simply accept what he is. The 30-year-old catcher will hit around the .240 range with a high walk rate (13.9% in 2018) and around 25 homers. That will look a lot better after looking at guys available to drafters who punt the position. Keep an open mind to Grandal, who should get targeted more aggressively in two-catcher and OBP leagues.
91 Miguel Cabrera (DET - 1B,DH) 140 38 154 91.0 22.5 152.0 +12.0
On the bright side, Cabrera recorded a .360 wOBA after notching a career-low .313 in 2017. The only problem: He played just 38 games due to a ruptured left biceps tendon. Don't bank on a fully healthy season from the first baseman, who turns 36 in April and has averaged 111 games over the last four seasons. Yet last year proved he's still a prolific hitter when healthy, even if no longer a massive home-run threat. If he falls beyond pick 150, it's worth rolling the dice on one of this generation's best sluggers churning out one more vintage season before his Hall of Fame career bites the dust.
92 Ryan Braun (MIL - 1B,LF) 137 36 150 96.6 19.3 186.0 +49.0
A regressing Braun still offers value. Despite posting career lows in batting average (.254), OBP (.313) and wRC+ (105), the veteran still stockpiled 20 homers and 11 steals last year. He faces far less competition for playing time now that the Brewers have traded Domingo Santana and Keon Broxton, so he'll go as far as his health takes him. The 35-year-old isn't washed just yet; he notched a .296 xBA and .515 xSLG, per Statcast. He should at least fare closer to 2017's .268/.336/.487 slash line, and a 25/15 campaign isn't out of the question if he could piece together 550 plate appearances in around 130 games. A massive discrepancy between his consensus ADP (210) and ECR (141) reveals an intriguing buy-low opportunity.
93 Ian Desmond (COL - 1B,LF) 150 77 162 102.5 19.8 147.0 -3.0
No player has a greater gap in actual and fantasy value than Desmond. He went 20/20 for the fifth time in his career, joining just 10 players to hit both benchmarks. He was also the worst position player in baseball, recording -0.7 fWAR with a .315 wOBA and mediocre defense at first base. He couldn't even cash in at Coors Field, where he hit a robust .239/.319/.404. The Rockies should bench him, but they probably won't admit to a sunk cost. Instead, they plan on starting him at center field, which means drafters can at least count on homers and steals (and multi-position eligibility) while hoping the Colorado altitude augments his batting average. It's nevertheless impossible to get too excited about a mediocre performer who notched an MLB-high 62.0% ground-ball rate.
94 Willson Contreras (CHC - C) 161 56 184 104.1 20.9 122.0 -39.0
Contreras had a horribly disappointing 2018 season, hitting just 10 home runs after belting 21 long balls the previous season. The lack of homers was also responsible for lopping more than 25 points off his batting average, as his strikeout rate and BABIP were virtually identical to 2017. Of particular concern was the decline in his hard hit rate, in a year when most players saw their hard hit rates soar. Contreras is just 26 years old and didn't deal with any notable injuries last season, so the sudden drop in power is tough to explain. It stands to reason that a big bounce back could be in store, but he has to be viewed as a boom-or-bust option coming off a lost year.
95 Paul DeJong (STL - SS) 151 70 172 104.1 18.0 170.0 +19.0
Since joining the league, DeJong is fifth among shortstops in homers per trip to the plate. He is right behind Francisco Lindor and Trevor Story, who are being drafted in the first and second rounds. Granted, the speed is a major difference but the batting average isn't at .275, .267 and .263. If DeJong can stay on the field this year, consensus projections like him to produce a very similar season to Carlos Correa who is being drafted 140 picks higher.
96 Jurickson Profar (OAK - 1B,2B,3B,SS) 159 61 170 104.3 19.6 140.0 -19.0
It took a bit longer than expected, but Profar finally emerged as a strong major leaguer by batting .254/.335/.458 with 20 homers and 10 steals. The Rangers oddly moved him to the A's, a move that presents a major ballpark downgrade after he slugged .511 in Arlington. Aside from a possible average uptick, the skills don't portend another leap forward. Perhaps the biggest incentive to drafting Profar is gleaning eligibility at first base, third, shortstop, and even second (10 games) in some leagues.
97 Amed Rosario (NYM - SS) 158 78 180 105.6 17.3 172.0 +14.0
Rosario was only 22 years old when everyone started losing faith. After failing to immediately become the next Francisco Lindor, he came to life by batting .284 with five homers and 15 steals over the final two months. He spent most of that stretch atop the Mets' lineup, a distinction he likely won't reclaim now that walks machine Brandon Nimmo can set the table for Jed Lowrie, Robinson Cano, Wilson Ramos, and Michael Conforto. Getting shunned to the bottom of the batting order is the only reason not to go all in on Rosario, a former top prospect who could still deliver 10 homers and 25 steals with a higher ceiling.
98 Elvis Andrus (TEX - SS) 153 45 167 106.0 20.7 164.0 +11.0
Andrus went from 20 homers and 25 steals to six and five, respectively. The speed drop-off is especially jarring, as he had reached at least 20 steals in each of his last nine MLB seasons. The 30-year-old should bounce back a bit from an elbow injury that contained him to 97 games, but there's some concern since he attempted just eight steals in 2017's second half. While drafters shouldn't pay a significant price for a recovery, there's enough of a track record to bite as an inexpensive middle infielder.
99 Carlos Santana (CLE - 1B,3B) 164 60 193 106.8 24.0 178.0 +14.0
A smooth selection (sorry) for OBP managers, Santana batted .229 after back-to-back .259 campaigns. He actually slashed his strikeout rate (13.7%) for the fourth straight season with a gaudy 16.2% walk rate. Having exceeded 600 plate appearances in each of the last eight seasons, he's an excellent compiler who could again broach 80 runs and RBI apiece with around 25 home runs. That will make him a sharp corner infielder if his batting average repairs closer to his career .247 mark, which matches last season's xBA on Statcast. He added third-base eligibility (19 games) in some leagues and could gain outfield during the season.
100 Adam Eaton (WSH - LF,RF) 160 76 223 109.3 16.6 195.0 +35.0
If he stays healthy, Eaton could go down as one of 2018's biggest steals. Pun somewhat intended, as he swiped nine of 10 opportunities in just 95 games when not sidelined by an ankle injury. Probably more important to his stock, he hit .301 with a .394 OBP, giving him an average and OBP above .280 and .360, respectively, in each of the last five seasons. That could give him an opportunity to bat ahead of Anthony Rendon and Juan Soto atop Washington's lineup. If his body cooperates, he'd become 2019's Michael Brantley.
101 Jonathan Schoop (MIN - 2B) 170 75 167 110.1 20.7 180.0 +10.0
Schoop takes a hit this season in home ballpark factor, but even still, has been a consistent enough source of power that fantasy owners can accept his .233 batting average from last year. Keep in mind, also, he carried a .293 mark in 2017 so the upside is there for a big season again.
102 Brandon Nimmo (NYM - LF,CF,RF) 167 72 185 110.2 19.2 169.0 +2.0
The Mets finally found playing time for Nimmo, who responded in kind with 17 homers, nine steals, and the sixth-highest wRC+ (149) among all qualified hitters. Because of his stellar 15.0% walk rate, the Mets are likely to deploy him in the leadoff role (at least against righties) ahead of a refurbished lineup. He should deposit plenty of runs with 20-homer, 10-steal potential, but beware a low batting average because of his precise pickiness at the plate. A solid mid-draft investment in five-by-leagues, Nimmo's gold in OBP formats.
103 Austin Meadows (TB - LF,CF,RF) DL10 154 52 188 110.6 22.6 200.0 +46.0
The Pirates had him buried on their depth chart for what seemed like forever thanks to the presence of Andrew McCutchen, Gregory Polanco and Starling Marte. Now that he has been freed to Tampa Bay (with Tyler Glasnow) in the Chris Archer trade, we will finally get to see the kid shine. Meadows was once considered a future all-star, and while he likely won't venture into that territory any time soon, if at all, we are looking at someone who, even as a rookie, should hold a mediocre batting average while contributing in all four of the other roto categories.
104 Domingo Santana (SEA - RF) 155 60 172 111.8 26.9 225.0 +70.0
Two years ago, Santana hit .278 with 30 home runs and 15 stolen bases. Then the Brewers acquired Christian Yelich and Lorenzo Cain, and Santana was relegated to backup duty. Now in Seattle, playing time will no longer be hard to come by, and a nice bounce back could be in store. We shouldn't expect Santana to fully replicate his 2017 numbers, but he's worth a stash to see what transpires.
105 Cesar Hernandez (PHI - 2B) 165 73 272 112.4 19.2 173.0 +8.0
Here's a case of launch angle not always helping. Hernandez elevated his launch angle from 3.3 to 9.4, and the philosophy shift produced a career-high 15 homers. He also, however, batted .253 after back-to-back .294 campaigns. The drop could potentially cost the second baseman his spot atop a Philadelphia lineup that has added Jean Segura, Andrew McCutchen, J.T. Realmuto, and Bryce Harper. An extra handful of homers isn't worth the average sacrifice for fantasy investors either, so here's to Hernandez resetting his approach and going back to being an on-base machine who could easily score 100 runs if batting leadoff. Regardless of his plate approach, he has delivered 15-19 steals in each of the past four seasons, making him a steady middle-infield target.
106 Kyle Schwarber (CHC - LF) 169 60 189 112.5 25.2 177.0 +8.0
The experts (146) and ADP (179) are still dreaming of what Schwarber could be rather than accepting who he is: a left-handed Evan Gattis with more walks and strikeouts. Both burly sluggers, unfortunately, no longer have catcher eligibility. While Schwarber can contribute in OBP or OPS leagues, the career .228 hitter is an average liability who won't make up for the glaring liability if the Cubs keep limiting his playing time. If lucky, drafters will get a .240, 30-homer outfielder with more intriguing power bats (Hunter Renfroe, Justin Smoak, Jake Lamb, a much cheaper Jay Bruce or Randal Grichuk) still on the board. Drafters could stay in Chicago and take the same power gambit on Daniel Palka over 100 picks later.
107 Wilson Ramos (NYM - C,DH) 177 57 206 113.9 30.4 136.0 -41.0
Since undergoing Lasik surgery before the 2016 season, Ramos has registered a .298/.343/.483 slash line with 20 homers per 500 plate appearances. Yet 2016 ended with a torn ACL, and a hamstring injury interrupted last year's All-Star campaign. After moving to the Mets, the 31-year-old can no longer DH, and a 54.9% ground-ball rate tempers his power upside. Despite all of these warts, he's a catcher with a good bat. He's a top-five option, just not one to lunge for before Salvador Perez or Yasmani Grandal.
108 Matt Olson (OAK - 1B) DL10 189 41 209 114.3 38.9 141.0 -48.0
After hitting a remarkable 24 home runs in just 59 games in 2017, Olson managed just 29 long balls in a full 162 game slate in 2018. But he was still among the league leaders in hard contact rate, and his batted ball profile suggests last season's home run total is close to his floor. Like many corner infielders, Olson won't be of any help in batting average or stolen bases, but is a strong bet for 30+ HRs with solid run production.
109 Yadier Molina (STL - C) 172 41 194 114.3 26.6 134.0 -38.0
It may surprise you to learn that Molina has finished as a top-three catcher in standard 5x5 roto leagues in back-to-back seasons and a top-five catcher in three straight seasons. Clearly, his mid-30s have agreed with him so far, but he does carry a little bit of risk this year as he recovers from offseason knee surgery. Durability has been Molina's calling card throughout his career, so if he's able to remain on the field there is a good chance he will again outperform some of the bigger names who are sure to go ahead of him in fantasy drafts.
110 Luke Voit (NYY - 1B) 173 65 170 116.1 23.7 168.0 -5.0
Voit dominated (.322/.398/.671, 15 HRs) in 47 games with the Yankees. His .447 wOBA matched Mike Trout, and his .437 wxOBA topped every hitter with at least 150 plate appearances. He also, however, posted a 40.5 HR/FB% with an abysmal 68.9% contact rate, stats which respectively scream HR and AVG regression. Given the microscopic sample size attached to 2018's breakout, there's still a chance he falls into the short end of a platoon with Greg Bird. Yet the scorching contact suggests he could ward off some red flags and leverage Yankee Stadium into a 30-homer campaign. Weigh the risks and rewards before determining whether to swing for the fences.
111 Corey Dickerson (PIT - LF,DH) DL10 174 68 192 116.3 21.5 204.0 +30.0
 
112 Byron Buxton (MIN - CF) 184 47 197 116.7 26.9 160.0 -24.0
Once deemed a future superstar, Buxton spent most of 2018 in Triple-A after batting .156 with a -3 wRC+ in 94 dreadful big league plate appearances. It's understandable to write him off, but he remains an elite defender who posted Statcast's highest sprint speed. While his 20-homer, 40-steal hasn't vanished, it's an increasingly less likely dream that would get accompanied by a minuscule batting average. He should have to fall beyond the top-200 picks before taking the high-risk plunge.
113 Buster Posey (SF - C,1B) 185 59 166 108.9 24.4 127.0 -58.0
Posey fell off the fantasy map in 2018, managing to hit just five home runs while playing through a hip ailment that eventually required surgery. He didn't show any obvious signs of decline in his batted ball profile, and his plate discipline remained as good as ever, so a modest bounce back should be expected. The biggest concern is that the Giants pump the brakes on Posey's playing time to preserve his health. Given his poor hitting environment, weak supporting cast, and lack of category juice, Posey needs to rack up a lot of at-bats in order for his typically high batting average to be a true difference-maker for fantasy owners.
114 Andrelton Simmons (LAA - SS) 179 76 176 119.3 20.5 221.0 +42.0
Simmons gets slept on because he doesn't stuff a single category, but don't overlook his contact skills. His microscopic 7.3% strikeout rate bested all qualified hitters last season, resulting in a .292 batting average. Yet a rise in value hit rate (10.3%) led xStats to ascribe an even higher .313 xBA. Having stolen 19 bases in 2017, last year's 10 represents a floor rather than the ceiling. He's a boring player to roster during the season, but he'll end up delivering a positive ROI with a high average flanked by around 10 homers and 10-15 steals.
115 Jorge Polanco (MIN - SS) 180 65 214 115.1 26.5 233.0 +53.0
Upon returning from an 80-game PED suspension, Polanco sustained 2017's late progress by batting .288/.345/.427 with six homers and seven steals. Although he doesn't hit the ball with much authority, the 25-year-old shortstop makes contact regularly (85.3%) and rarely whiffs (6.1%). Perhaps drafters don't see enough upside to drive up his price, but he's a strong candidate to hit for a steady-to-strong average with around 15 homers and steals apiece. That could especially make him a middle-infield bargain since a power-heavy Twins lineup has no better fit for the leadoff role.
116 Ramon Laureano (OAK - RF) 187 88 163 120.1 15.6 218.0 +31.0
A quiet difference-maker down the stretch, Laureano batted .288/.358/.474 with five homers and seven steals in 48 games with the A's. He's unlikely to sustain that average with a 28.4% strikeout rate, and his .388 BABIP is likely to fall in a larger sample. He also had no answer for major league breaking balls (.188 wOBA), a weakness pitchers should attack after getting a better scouting report. Yet the 24-year-old outfielder, who offered 14 homers and 11 steals in Triple-A before last summer's promotion, offers an intriguing power-speed repertoire as an OF4 or 5. His glove should also keep him on the field. He hits the ball hard enough to reasonably draft for a .260, 15/15 output while hoping for more.
117 Marcus Semien (OAK - SS) 192 64 176 120.4 21.7 220.0 +28.0
Semien always seems to stick around long enough for drafters who want double-digit homers and steals from a cheap middle infielder. He has never reached a 100 wRC+ or batted above .261, so there's limited upside now that 2016's 27 homers stands out as a career outlier. There's also a chance he moves down the batting order, which guarantees he'll come nowhere close to 2018's 703 plate appearance and 89 runs. Here's the good news: You don't need to pay for last year's results. Even if he plates 20 fewer runs, Semien will get the job done with another .250, 15/15-type campaign.
118 Jesse Winker (CIN - LF,RF) 191 76 183 122.1 20.5 187.0 -4.0
 
119 Jackie Bradley Jr. (BOS - CF,RF) 186 82 171 122.7 15.9 245.0 +59.0
 
120 Harrison Bader (STL - LF,CF,RF) DL10 190 85 156 119.5 17.6 179.0 -11.0
The latest byproduct of Cardinal Devil Magic, Bader broke out with 12 homers, 15 steals, and a 3.5 fWAR in 138 games. The WAR doesn't directly help fantasy investors, but stellar defense in center field should preserve a starting job on a crowded Cardinals roster with one corner-outfield spot left for Dexter Fowler, Tyler O'Neill, and Jose Martinez. A 29.3 K% and .220 xBA threaten his passable .264 batting average and said security, but there's also a high steals ceiling with last year's ninth-highest Statcast Sprint Speed Score (29.9 feet/second). Don't go overboard on his rookie success.
121 Billy Hamilton (KC - CF) 199 73 196 123.9 23.5 155.0 -44.0
Hamilton may have the found the perfect place to salvage his torpedoing fantasy stock. Only four teams attempted more stolen bases last year than the Royals, whose roster is desolate across the diamond. Ned Yost has often batted Alcides Escobar and his .293 OBP atop the lineup, so the former Reds center fielder may get a crack at the leadoff role. He's a terrible hitter who only helps in one category, but Hamilton's glove still justifies MLB playing time. Plus, drafters no longer have to pay a premium for someone who has swiped 208 bags over the last four seasons. It's at least a tempting thought in five-by-five roto leagues due to the discount.
122 Eduardo Escobar (ARI - 3B,SS) 200 67 205 126.5 24.0 176.0 -24.0
 
123 Josh Bell (PIT - 1B) 201 80 164 127.3 20.4 254.0 +53.0
Bell has shown us a .273 batting average before and another year he swatted 26 homers with 90 RBIs. Last year was a little bit in between, but he has the potential to do both one day and perhaps this year.
124 Jake Bauers (CLE - 1B,LF) 211 91 181 128.3 21.0 251.0 +40.0
A Debbie Downer will point to Bauers' .201 batting average, but he also registered 11 homers, six steals, and a 13.9% walk rate in 388 plate appearances. He arrived strong with a .371 wOBA before the All-Star break, but his strikeouts then skyrocketed (30.5%). Cleveland acquired him to replace Carlos Santana and Edwin Encarnacion as the everyday first baseman who will likely bat in a prime run-producing spot in a lineup featuring Jose Ramirez and (eventually) Francisco Lindor. Even if he doesn't possess a high average, Bauer makes a fine corner infielder or fourth/fifth outfielder because of his availability to contribute everywhere else.
125 Shin-Soo Choo (TEX - LF,RF,DH) 205 76 185 129.1 19.2 260.0 +55.0
 
126 Max Kepler (MIN - CF,RF) DTD 202 85 231 129.3 30.3 239.0 +37.0
Kepler's incremental raises in home runs (17, 19, 20) and wOBA (.313, .315, .316) suggest he's still a boring player not progressing nearly rapidly enough to target in most mixed leagues. Yet he made some significant gains in 2018 that point to more significant development. The outfielder improved his walk (11.6%) and strikeout (15.7%) rates to personal bests while also making notable leaps in fly balls (46.2%) and hard hits (37.1%). These gains should yield a higher batting average than last year's .224 with the potential for 25 homers if given another 611 plate appearances. Most drafters have already closed the book on Kepler as a meddling depth piece after three full seasons, but the 26-year-old could finally expedite his growth with a full-fledged breakout.
127 Justin Smoak (TOR - 1B,DH) 188 71 187 120.9 22.9 197.0 +9.0
While Smoak fell off from 2017's 38 homers and 133 wRC+, he still chipped in 25 homers and a 121 wRC+ with help from a stellar 14.0% walk rate in 594 plate appearances. He also dealt with a wrist injury early in the season while maintaining impressive hard-hit (41.5%) and barrel (10.5%) rates. With an ADP outside the top 200, he merely needs to repeat 2018, preferably with some better run production in more games. Yet 30 homers is still in play, in which case he'll make a great corner-infield bargain.
128 Odubel Herrera (PHI - CF) DL10 208 82 203 130.2 19.9 215.0 +7.0
 
129 Randal Grichuk (TOR - CF,RF) 214 73 218 135.2 26.3 242.0 +28.0
 
130 Franmil Reyes (SD - LF,RF) 213 70 253 135.4 31.7 235.0 +22.0
 
131 Trey Mancini (BAL - 1B,LF) 222 65 189 135.8 22.8 272.0 +50.0
Mancini's batting average dropped 50 points last year, but much of that was due to a rough BABIP. While he likely won't bounce-back up to the .290's his batting average likely won't kill you while he provides another 25 homers for fantasy owners.
132 Hunter Renfroe (SD - LF,RF) 225 91 233 141.3 26.1 198.0 -27.0
Looking like no more than a short-end platoon bat, Renfroe unearthed his raw power to rake 19 home runs in 60 second-half games. That late surge helped secure some fantasy titles, but the price isn't rising since he must compete with Wil Myers, Manuel Margot, Franmil Reyes, and Franchy Cordero for playing time in San Diego's outfield. A 112 wRC+ against righties should give him a shot to avoid a small-portioned timeshare, but any slump could promptly cost the 27-year-old playing time. He's also a solid bet to pop 30 long balls if given just 500 plate appearances, so don't sleep on him if competitors are avoiding a crowded outfield.
133 Gregory Polanco (PIT - RF) DL10 227 71 195 141.4 24.5 231.0 +4.0
 
134 Jake Lamb (ARI - 3B) DL10 228 101 189 143.4 16.3 265.0 +37.0
You may not feel great about drafting Lamb after his trainwreck 2018 season, but he is just one year removed from 30 homers and 105 RBIs so don't sleep on him bouncing back. With that said, the move to the humidor in Arizona makes it seem as though his ceiling is a bit lower than what we saw from him in 2017.
135 Maikel Franco (PHI - 3B) 229 80 197 143.9 23.3 257.0 +28.0
Franco has always had plenty of potential, but has yet to put it together for a full season. Over his final 350 at-bats last year, he was excellent and now that the Phillies bulked up their lineup, it is possible that Franco could break out for a .280, 25 homer, 100 RBI season.
136 Yuli Gurriel (HOU - 1B,3B,DH) 221 82 199 131.9 23.7 184.0 -37.0
The only first basemen to bat at least .290 in each of the last two years? Freddie Freeman, Paul Goldschmidt, and Yuli Gurriel. Houston's career .291 hitter is an underrated stabilizer in batting average who can also drive in 75-85 runs in a stacked lineup. He even popped five homers in September after a long power drought, so the veteran should at least offer double-digit long balls. He's a boring, but productive depth piece for a drafter who loaded up on high-power average liabilities.
137 Ketel Marte (ARI - 2B,SS) 226 92 211 137.6 22.5 250.0 +24.0
He didn't quite validate last spring's sleeper appeal, but Marte continued to flash the skills that should prompt drafters to give him another shot. Despite batting .260, he produced a noteworthy 85.9% contact rate while dropping his strikeout rate to 13.4%. He appeared to put it all together when hitting .296/.377/.464 after the All-Star break, and the speed remains existent if ever given the green light. He's a strong middle-infield target who will gain eligibility at center field.
138 C.J. Cron (MIN - 1B,DH) 217 77 209 137.7 25.5 243.0 +26.0
While he won't help much in batting average, Cron did hit 30 homers in just 140 games last season. He may see a further bump with full playing time and a ballpark upgrade from Tampa to Minnesota.
139 Scooter Gennett (CIN - 2B) DL10 223 50 259 131.6 55.7 123.0 -100.0
Gennett experienced a major breakout in his first season with the Reds in 2017, and his 2018 encore was just about as good. Last season's .310 batting average was fueled by a .358 BABIP that is due for a bit of a correction, but he should still be able to hit at least .280 or so. Meanwhile, his home run output should hold steady in the mid-20s while his already-strong run and RBI production could see a slight boost from an improved supporting cast.
140 Garrett Hampson (COL - 2B,SS) 233 66 253 140.5 36.9 202.0 -31.0
The signing of Daniel Murphy should cause Hampson's ECR to drop another 50 spots, as that transaction shifts Ryan McMahon over to second base. Hampson could force the Rockies hands with a strong Spring, but more than likely, he won't get the call until someone hits the DL. At that point, McMahon could slide over to first, third or the outfield. If it is Story that goes down, Hampson would fill the gap. He could eventually be a better version of D.J. LeMahieu offensively, posting a batting average near .300 with more power and speed. Right away, he will merely hold his own in the batting average department while contributing nearly 30 steals per 162 games.
141 Pete Alonso (NYM - 1B,DH) 230 61 188 136.4 28.4 234.0 +4.0
Like Vlad Jr. and Eloy, Alonso's true impact will depend on whether on not the big league club makes space for him. As it stands now, Todd Frazier is likely to play first base with Jed Lowrie manning the other corner. It is possible that Alonso pushes the envelope in the spring, forcing Lowrie to shortstop, but more than likely, we are looking at his arrival coming when the first infielder heads to the DL. With an older group of players, that may be sooner than later. When he arrives, he will come with a dangerous stick right away and could be one of the stronger second half rookies. In the minors last year, Alonso swatted 36 homers and drove in 119 runners in just 478 at-bats.
142 Danny Jansen (TOR - C) 235 88 244 149.0 30.4 188.0 -47.0
Now that Martin was dealt to the Dodgers, Jansen is the favorite to start at catcher for the Blue Jays. He doesn't have much power, but his average will be quality and he should play enough that the RBIs and runs will make him a fringe top 12 fantasy catcher.
143 Tyler White (HOU - 1B) 220 38 302 141.1 33.3 267.0 +47.0
White closed out the season on a terror for Houston, finishing with an .888 OPS. He likely will open the season as their DH and has a chance at breaking out, but may be pushed out of the lineup by Kyle Tucker if he slips up.
144 DJ LeMahieu (NYY - 2B) 238 88 239 146.8 28.5 212.0 -26.0
The Yankees signed LeMahieu to fill a super-utility role, but why would anyone with a working memory expect Troy Tulowitzki to stay healthy and succeed? Although he won't contend for another batting title away from Coors, the second baseman showed more power with a career-high 15 homers last year. His spray chart overlay actually showed more batted balls that would have cleared Yankee Stadium's miniature fences, so the 30-year-old can make a sneaky bargain for those completely writing off someone leaving Colorado without a locked-in everyday spot.
145 Nick Markakis (ATL - RF) 244 101 220 152.0 23.8 248.0 +4.0
 
146 Willy Adames (TB - 2B,SS) 237 100 192 146.8 21.0 274.0 +37.0
Adames broke onto the scene last year as a 22-year-old posting a 19-homer, 11 stolen base pace with a .278 batting average. It was a limited sample size, however, and there are still some holes in his swing. Think of him on the same terms as Dansby Swanson who also had a nice rookie campaign before everyone realized he had quite a bit to go offensively.
147 Ryan Zimmerman (WSH - 1B) 246 99 193 149.2 19.7 337.0 +91.0
It appears most drafters are mistakenly throwing in the towel on Zimmerman. Following 2017's unexpected return to stardom, an oblique strain limited him to just 85 games. While his batting average fell from .303 to .264, he still delivered when healthy. Per Statcast, only Joey Gallo, J.D. Martinez, and Khris Davis garnered more barrels per plate appearance than Zimmerman's 9.9%, which tied Mookie Betts. Only Aaron Judge hit a higher percentage of his batted balls at least 95 mph than the first baseman's 52.8. This thunderous contact yielded results when he batted .295/.374/.538 in 52 games after returning from a lengthy injury absence. Forget a 2017 repeat; drafters simply need a higher average in around 115 games when purchasing him off the clearance rack.
148 Asdrubal Cabrera (TEX - 2B,3B,SS) DTD 241 94 235 149.4 26.0 199.0 -42.0
Now that Cabrera is with the Rangers and expected to play every day, we can feel comfortable grabbing him late in drafts as a reliable source of power to go with a decent batting average.
149 Nick Senzel (CIN - 3B) MiLB 252 98 294 150.1 31.1 206.0 -46.0
Fantasy owners were disappointed to get nothing out of Senzel at the MLB level last year, but they shouldn't give up hope. Rather, barring another series of injuries, he will be with the big league club, weather in Cincy, Miami, San Diego or Cleveland (pending potential trades) rather quickly. He is a true five-tool player and could end up qualifying at 2B, 3B, SS and OF.
150 Lourdes Gurriel Jr. (TOR - 2B,SS) MiLB 249 79 244 155.6 31.8 241.0 -8.0
On a 162-game pace, Gurriel was a 27 homer hitter with a .281 batting average and 87 RBIs. He may not keep up that pace with a full season's worth of at bats, but you can argue that is his upside which would make for an exceptional value late in drafts.
151 Jose Martinez (STL - 1B,RF) 257 90 304 155.2 33.1 201.0 -56.0
Martinez rakes, there is no doubt about that, but he also lost his path to playing time when Paul Goldschmidt was acquired this off-season. Now, he requires an injury to either Marcell Ozuna or Dexter Fowler/Tyler O'Neill to see more than 300 at-bats.
152 Welington Castillo (CWS - C) 265 100 247 167.6 26.9 224.0 -41.0
Catcher was bleak enough before losing Salvador Perez, so Castillo stands out as a fine choice for those who punt the position. An avalanche of injuries led him to post a middling .308 wOBA in 49 games, but he clobbered 53 homers over the previous three seasons. The career .259/.318/.427 hitter could combine a solid average with 15 long balls.
153 Kevin Kiermaier (TB - CF) 273 109 238 163.7 24.5 318.0 +45.0
 
154 Marwin Gonzalez (MIN - 1B,2B,SS,LF) 263 108 306 159.3 27.8 232.0 -31.0
Outside of Marwin's huge 2017 season, he hasn't offered much from an offensive perspective. There is some power, but his batting average will hurt fantasy teams and the depth chart doesn't guarantee even 450 at-bats for him.
155 Starlin Castro (MIA - 2B) 256 105 237 159.6 27.8 350.0 +94.0
Castro went from one of the best ballparks to the worst possible offensive ballpark last season and it showed in his stats as he dropped from a .300 batting average and 20 homer pace to 12 homers and just a .278 average. More than likely, that is the mediocre type of production fantasy owners will get this year.
156 Joc Pederson (LAD - LF,CF) 266 120 237 168.4 21.4 308.0 +42.0
 
157 Brian Anderson (MIA - 3B,RF) 272 122 236 165.0 19.7 325.0 +53.0
 
158 Fernando Tatis Jr. (SD - SS) 255 46 345 148.5 56.5 253.0 -2.0
Tatis isn't expected to break camp with the Padres, but it shouldn't take long for him to get the call to San Diego. When he does, you can expect a useful mix of both power and speed and a premium position. He is among the top draft and stash options for those of you that play in leagues with deeper benches or a farm spot.
159 Cedric Mullins (BAL - CF) 260 111 319 161.6 32.6 345.0 +85.0
 
160 Brandon Belt (SF - 1B,LF) 270 113 205 163.4 16.8 331.0 +61.0
Belt still hasn't surpassed 20 homers in any season and over the last two seasons, his batting average has dropped down below .255. If he can stay healthy for once, however, Belt may reach 25 homers if he keeps up his HR-rate.
161 Adam Jones (ARI - CF,DH) 268 94 305 167.3 35.1 312.0 +44.0
Steven Souza's season-ending knee surgery will likely clear up a starting spot for Jones, who still hit .281 with 15 homers in a down 2018. The durable veteran has averaged 151 games played over the past nine seasons, and he had gone seven straight seasons with at least 25 long balls before last year's decline. He's a boring depth piece who can help fill an injury void in deep leagues.
162 Miguel Sano (MIN - 1B,3B,DH) DL10 269 73 250 160.8 28.4 269.0
Sano, who has never recorded 500 plate appearances in a big league season, is unlikely to reach that mark in 2019. After injuring his heel during the offseason, he's not expected to be ready until May, at the earliest. There's still the matter of him hitting .199/.281/.398 with a 38.5% strikeout rate last season. While he makes too much hard contact to again bat below the Mendoza line, all the punchouts make him unlikely to climb much higher than his career .244 clip. Because of these holes, drafters should be able to stash a 25-year-old with a high walk rate and top-shelf power on the cheap. Only take him in five-by-five drafts if needing power and getting a steep discount.
163 Manuel Margot (SD - CF) 281 87 271 166.3 29.6 387.0 +106.0
 
164 Evan Longoria (SF - 3B) 276 124 218 164.1 21.0 354.0 +78.0
Longoria had a rough season for fantasy owners in 2018, but the batting average was held back by an abnormally low BABIP and his power was right on track for another 20 to 25 homers had he been healthy for the full season. In deeper leagues, his reliability is exactly what you should be targeting.
165 Chris Taylor (LAD - 2B,SS,LF,CF) 275 97 226 148.9 26.4 211.0 -64.0
With the way the Dodgers' team is constructed, it is tough to tell whether Taylor will see another 500 at-bats this year, but if he does, we are probably looking at 20 homers and double-digit steals to go with a decent batting average and plenty of runs.
166 Yonder Alonso (CWS - 1B) 278 98 236 163.6 25.9 374.0 +96.0
Alonso wasn't especially impressive last year with a .250 batting average and just 23 homers, but he is just one year removed from posting an .866 OPS with Oakland and Seattle so don't discount a big bounce-back campaign.
167 Joey Wendle (TB - 2B,LF) 280 92 232 163.9 22.7 236.0 -44.0
It is easy to look at a .300 batting average and assume a rookie will only get better. Wendle likely played over his head last year, though, and was a 28-year-old rookie. There is no power to his game, and while he may offer 15 to 20 steals, it won't be enough to make him anything more than a late-round pick.
168 Jed Lowrie (NYM - 2B,3B) DL10 279 103 270 168.9 31.8 281.0 +2.0
Lowrie gave fantasy owners a surprising boost in power last season in Oakland and always offers a decent batting average. He might start the season on the DL with a knee injury, but once he returns, Lowrie should be owned in every league.
169 Wilmer Flores (ARI - 1B,2B,3B) 284 74 257 166.5 36.4 364.0 +80.0
Over the last four seasons, Flores has been a useful fantasy player when he gets at-bats, posting 21 homers, 72 RBIs and a .267 batting average per 162 games. He should see plenty of playing time in Arizona this year and qualifies at second base, driving up his value.
170 Jeimer Candelario (DET - 3B) 282 125 286 171.8 27.5 342.0 +60.0
There is nothing sexy about drafting Candelario, but you can anticipate his batting average coming up 20 points this year, as he was among the most unlucky hitters in that department last year. Along with that, fantasy owners should get around 20 homers from him.
171 Mike Zunino (TB - C) PL 285 111 258 176.4 29.1 216.0 -69.0
Zunino is one of the better sources of power at the catcher position, but with a .207 lifetime average and enormous 34.2 percent career strikeout rate, he is a major liability in the batting average department. As a result, he's finished as a top-14 fantasy catcher just once -- in 2017, when he rode a completely unsustainable .355 BABIP to a .251 batting average. He's simply too big of a batting average drain to be an appealing starting option in 12-team leagues.
172 Kole Calhoun (LAA - RF) 283 126 232 170.2 22.1 436.0 +153.0
 
173 Matt Kemp (CIN - LF,RF) 293 118 307 181.3 33.4 291.0 -2.0
 
174 Kevin Pillar (SF - CF) 286 119 281 168.4 29.4 314.0 +28.0
 
175 Brett Gardner (NYY - LF,CF) 291 102 233 180.5 22.1 322.0 +31.0
 
176 Jorge Soler (KC - RF,DH) 288 92 237 166.0 28.3 311.0 +23.0
 
177 Kike Hernandez (LAD - 1B,2B,SS,LF,CF,RF) 295 89 278 169.5 36.8 288.0 -7.0
Last season we saw a major breakout from Hernandez who was previously a platoon-only bat versus lefties. Kike swatted 21 bombs in just 402 at-bats, and while that may happen again, he offers nothing in terms of speed and is more than likely a .230 batting average guy.
178 Kendrys Morales (OAK - 1B,DH) 290 115 232 174.1 24.3 449.0 +159.0
 
179 Kyle Seager (SEA - 3B) DL60 296 93 272 181.5 39.3 270.0 -26.0
Seager is starting the season on the DL after hand surgery and may miss the first six weeks. As a result, you may not want to draft him, but he should be in the back of your mind as a waiver wire pickup within a couple of weeks. He is a reliable source of power and shouldn't hurt you in batting average as much as we saw last year.
180 Francisco Cervelli (PIT - C) 304 108 311 174.9 37.5 228.0 -76.0
Among all catchers with 200 plate appearances, Cervelli corralled the second-highest wOBA (.355) behind Wilson Ramos. His modest 12 homers comfortably cleared his previous high of seven, but concussions limited him to 404 plate appearances. He's unlikely to turn into a big bopper during his age-33 season, but Cervelli is a fine placeholder while healthy.
181 Ryan McMahon (COL - 1B,2B,3B) 297 85 289 155.3 40.6 307.0 +10.0
McMahon may have struggled in a limited sample last year, but there are countless fantasy baseball studs with that on their resume as rookies. The fact of the matter is that the dude can hit. In 125 Triple-A games, he has tallied 68 extra-base hits with a .337 batting average. Over a full season, that would have been close to 90! Not only that, but he should steal double-digit bases as well while qualifying for potentially every position except shortstop and catcher. If the Rockies make room in their lineup for him, we are looking at one of the biggest breakout candidates of 2019.
182 Jeff McNeil (NYM - 2B) 292 94 249 161.1 27.6 283.0 -9.0
 
183 Avisail Garcia (TB - RF) 311 102 270 185.5 32.6 381.0 +70.0
 
184 Francisco Mejia (SD - C,DH) 302 112 277 177.1 32.0 223.0 -79.0
Much of Mejia's production will depend on where he plays this season. The Padres are among the front-runners to land J.T. Realmuto, which oddly enough, would help Mejia a great deal. As it is now, the catching prospect is stuck behind Austin Hedges, who is among the top defensive catchers in baseball, but a trade to Miami, or perhaps even Cleveland or Cincinnati, would make him a fringe top 12 fantasy catcher right away. Mejia has more pop than your average catcher already and could eventually hit around .290 as his approach matures.
185 Jung Ho Kang (PIT - 3B) 300 93 297 166.6 40.2 344.0 +44.0
Kang may not open the season as the starter in Pittsburgh, but with the way he is playing this spring, you'll want to keep a close eye on him. After all, we've seen Kang be a useful fantasy piece in years prior.
186 Ian Happ (CHC - 3B,LF,CF,RF) MiLB 328 110 268 178.4 30.9 324.0 -4.0
There isn't a direct path to consistent playing time in the Cubs lineup for Happ, but you can bet Maddon will find a way to get him nearly 400 at-bats, and if one of their starters suffers an injury, Happ has an outside chance at 25 homers and 15 steals which would be an incredible value late into drafts.
187 Kyle Tucker (HOU - LF) MiLB 317 106 320 191.5 46.1 327.0 +10.0
The Astros don't currently have a spot for Tucker with Michael Brantley now joining George Springer and Josh Reddick in the outfield. With prospects like Tucker, however, there is no need for a spot. He is good enough that they will make room. When he gets the call, expect him to be a top 35 fantasy outfielder right away, and perhaps even more. Tucker may be the top draft and stash prospect this year if you've got room on your bench.
188 Tyler O'Neill (STL - LF,RF) DL10 306 110 335 183.5 40.0 336.0 +30.0
 
189 Adam Frazier (PIT - 2B,LF,RF) DTD 312 115 333 173.8 42.9 326.0 +14.0
 
190 Justin Bour (LAA - 1B) 313 92 274 189.9 33.5 351.0 +38.0
 
191 Daniel Palka (CWS - LF,RF,DH) MiLB 322 108 299 180.9 32.3 335.0 +13.0
 
192 Robinson Chirinos (HOU - C) 347 115 259 189.7 29.3 252.0 -95.0
Chirinos' 35 home runs over the last two seasons ranks eighth at the catcher position, and it has translated to back-to-back seasons in which Chirinos has finished as a top-12 fantasy catcher in 5x5 roto leagues, including a top-seven finish last year. He's expected to serve as the Astros' starting catcher after signing a one-year deal in the offseason, and while he'll likely bat at the bottom of the order, Chirinos should benefit from a good hitting environment and a lineup that is strong from top to bottom. He's likely to be a drain on batting average considering his high strikeout rate, but the pop is legit. Look his way if you're hunting for a sleeper at the position.
193 Scott Schebler (CIN - CF,RF) 329 135 247 187.3 23.6 396.0 +67.0
 
194 Jay Bruce (SEA - 1B,RF) DTD 323 134 240 187.9 20.8 317.0 -6.0
 
195 Teoscar Hernandez (TOR - LF,RF) 326 114 254 178.4 31.5 375.0 +49.0
 
196 Christin Stewart (DET - LF) DL10 316 114 343 179.3 41.4 341.0 +25.0
Stewart is expected to start for the Tigers, but their offense is so barren that he can't be relied on for many RBIs or runs. His batting average might be ok, but more likely, his power would be the calling card. He is one worth keeping an eye on, but shouldn't be on your draft radar in standard-sized mixed leagues.
197 Ryan O'Hearn (KC - 1B) 324 82 279 181.8 41.5 343.0 +19.0
 
198 Jorge Alfaro (MIA - C) 332 116 261 195.3 30.9 263.0 -69.0
Alfaro is dealing with a knee issue that may keep him out at the start of the season, but he has so little competition in Miami that fantasy owners may still get 350 to 400 at-bats and the counting stats that go with it. Don't be surprised if he hits near his career .270 average once again either.
199 Tucker Barnhart (CIN - C) 335 127 320 191.2 37.5 285.0 -50.0
Barnhart doesn't have the best bat, but his elite defense will keep him on the field for nearly 500 at-bats again. In a killer Red's lineup, that should be plenty to get him the counting stats he needs to be draftable.
200 Yan Gomes (WSH - C) 346 113 334 195.5 38.4 264.0 -82.0
Gomes' 2018 (.266, 16 HR, 48 RBI, 52 runs) was enough to make him a top-10 catcher last season. Yet he's now going to split time in Washington with Kurt Suzuki, who posted similar numbers (.271, 12 HR, 50 RBI, 45 runs) in a timeshare for the Braves. That makes both of them solid second catchers who can fill is as a one-catcher stopgap if the other one gets hurt.
201 Niko Goodrum (DET - 1B,2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 344 139 313 192.7 34.3 298.0 -46.0
 
202 Ian Kinsler (SD - 2B) 349 135 270 194.6 35.2 379.0 +30.0
 
203 Ronald Guzman (TEX - 1B) DL10 340 112 268 192.7 33.6 550.0 +210.0
 
204 Willians Astudillo (MIN - C,3B) 362 141 291 196.7 32.0 282.0 -80.0
With a strikeout rate below five percent at every level of the minors -- and during his 30 game cup of coffee with the Twins last year -- Astudillo has the kind of high-level contact skills that can make him an asset in batting average, particularly at the weak-hitting catcher position. He could also pop 15 home runs if given regular at-bats, but it's his at-bat total that is the big question. Astudillo isn't guaranteed a roster spot, let alone a starting job, but if he can find a way to reach 300+ plate appearances, he will be an intriguing dark horse candidate to finish as a top-12 catcher in mixed leagues. He's worth monitoring closely in Spring Training.
205 Franchy Cordero (SD - LF,CF) DL10 350 106 269 192.3 35.3 450.0 +100.0
 
206 Jason Kipnis (CLE - 2B,CF,DH) 351 134 246 193.0 32.4 378.0 +27.0
Kipnis has been around forever and reached his peak long ago, but he is still just 32 years old and has plenty of baseball left in him. Unfortunately for fantasy owners, it will come without any speed or a quality batting average. Still, 20 homers and 70 RBIs will do the trick as a late-round pick.
207 Delino DeShields (TEX - CF) 357 129 266 204.3 28.7 347.0 -10.0
 
208 Leonys Martin (CLE - OF) 345 142 295 199.4 30.2 438.0 +93.0
 
209 Josh Harrison (DET - 2B) 348 120 270 199.3 33.2 475.0 +127.0
 
210 Didi Gregorius (NYY - SS) DL60 365 141 300 205.0 34.3 290.0 -75.0
Gregorius finished as a top-seven fantasy shortstop in standard 5x5 leagues last year despite missing a few weeks due to a heel injury. A more significant elbow injury followed during the playoffs, and Gregorius is now expected to miss the first half of the season following Tommy John surgery. The procedure isn't a huge long-term concern for a position player, but whether he is worth drafting comes down to your number of bench spots and DL spots -- not to mention the other shortstop(s) on your roster. He's fully capable of producing 10-15 HRs with a decent batting average and good run production in the second half of the season.
211 Lewis Brinson (MIA - OF) 363 80 285 199.7 39.6 451.0 +88.0
 
212 Greg Allen (CLE - CF,RF) 356 109 322 206.3 41.4 313.0 -43.0
 
213 Brandon Lowe (TB - 2B) 371 124 316 203.4 44.8 406.0 +35.0
 
214 Zack Cozart (LAA - 2B,3B,SS) 354 110 278 200.8 29.3 460.0 +106.0
Cozart may miss time at the start of the season with a mild calf strain, and after his 2018 performance, it is fair to forget about him, but don't be so quick to forget how excellent he was in 2017 with the Reds, knocking 24 homers with a .297 batting average in just 122 games.
215 Josh Reddick (HOU - LF,RF) 375 160 259 201.0 25.7 385.0 +10.0
 
216 Mark Trumbo (BAL - RF,DH) DL60 364 119 265 193.2 33.4 393.0 +29.0
 
217 Brandon Crawford (SF - SS) 359 147 308 198.0 31.2 376.0 +17.0
Crawford is never going to steal bases or hit for a great average, but you can count on him to play 150 games which will add up in the RBIs and runs department, plus he is good for a dozen homers every year.
218 Ryon Healy (SEA - 1B) 360 99 292 208.5 36.5 353.0 -7.0
 
219 Orlando Arcia (MIL - SS) 361 125 281 204.3 27.5 461.0 +100.0
 
220 Yoenis Cespedes (NYM - LF) DL10 380 138 448 216.0 67.7 409.0 +29.0
 
221 Luis Urias (SD - 2B) MiLB 370 142 264 205.2 32.0 389.0 +19.0
Urias seems to be the favorite to start the season as the Padres' primary shortstop. If he were playing in a different home park, we might be talking about him as a challenger to Victor Robles to win the NL Rookie of the Year award. Rather, his offensive production will most probably be limited to a replacement level fantasy player. With that said, he does have a much higher ceiling so make sure to keep an eye on him from the get-go.
222 Dansby Swanson (ATL - SS) 376 126 274 215.2 24.9 330.0 -46.0
Swanson had another rough season for fantasy owners in 2018, batting .238, but he did manage 14 homers and 10 stolen bases in a shortened season and let's not forget that there is untapped potential here as well. He isn't the worst late-round flier.
223 Omar Narvaez (SEA - C) 379 121 299 209.0 35.5 303.0 -76.0
 
224 Austin Barnes (LAD - C,2B) 417 154 321 219.8 42.0 321.0 -96.0
 
225 Chad Pinder (OAK - 2B,3B,LF,RF) 414 124 299 222.3 47.9 572.0 +158.0
 
226 Kurt Suzuki (WSH - C) 403 122 262 215.8 26.8 340.0 -63.0
There's nothing sexy about drafting Sukuzi, a 35-year old journeyman backstop who's never hit 20 home runs and may not even be the Nationals' quote-unquote "starter" behind the plate. But thanks to a bit of pop and very good contact skills for a catcher, Suzuki has quietly finished as a top-11 fantasy catcher in fewer than 400 plate appearances in each of the last two seasons. It remains to be seen how playing time will be divided between Suzuki and Yan Gomes in Washington, but between catching and even getting the occasional start at first base, Suzuki could get enough playing time to once again sneak into the starting catcher conversation in 12-team leagues.
227 Mitch Moreland (BOS - 1B) 389 140 286 217.5 30.2 401.0 +12.0
 
228 Ben Zobrist (CHC - 2B,LF,RF) 400 176 282 225.8 25.9 373.0 -27.0
Zobrist isn't going to see 500 at-bats, nor does he offer much in the way of power or speed, but he is a reliable source of batting average late in drafts and that should be enough to warrant owning him as a depth piece.
229 Jason Heyward (CHC - CF,RF) 391 185 316 228.6 37.1 473.0 +82.0
 
230 Eric Thames (MIL - 1B,LF,RF) 406 81 297 225.2 47.2 398.0 -8.0
 
231 Nick Ahmed (ARI - SS) 386 169 295 225.5 30.1 484.0 +98.0
 
232 Tyler Flowers (ATL - C) 410 161 328 219.2 41.2 412.0 +2.0
 
233 Greg Bird (NYY - 1B) DL10 396 153 377 241.3 55.0 369.0 -27.0
 
234 Johan Camargo (ATL - 3B,SS) 401 165 332 228.8 35.7 380.0 -21.0
Camargo flew under the radar last season and somehow swatted 19 homers and batted .272 in a utility role. He should get back to those 450 at-bats this year thanks to all the positions he plays, and we know his bat can be trusted while he is in the lineup.
235 Austin Hedges (SD - C) 412 158 293 223.1 34.7 323.0 -89.0
Hedges is no help in the batting average department, but he has enough power (32 homers in his last 700 at-bats) that he warrants a late-round pick if you still need a catcher. If he gets traded mid-season to clear up room for Mejia, Hedges could see a bump in his offensive production away from San Diego's ballpark.
236 John Hicks (DET - C,1B) 418 130 331 223.2 47.9 367.0 -51.0
 
237 Evan Gattis (DH) FA 420 40 281 206.6 50.0 479.0 +59.0
 
238 Willie Calhoun (TEX - LF) MiLB 423 155 317 232.9 42.3 544.0 +121.0
Initially an intriguing post-hype flier, Calhoun lost a roster spot to Hunter Pence following a dreadful spring. After getting held in the minors because of his glove, his bat (.602 OPS) didn't keep him in the majors last season. The 24-year-old still carries considerable contact and power upside, but managers can't afford to wait on him in smaller mixed leagues.
239 Joe Panik (SF - 2B) 421 175 276 227.9 29.1 495.0 +74.0
 
240 Albert Almora Jr. (CHC - CF) 405 155 318 234.7 32.9 481.0 +76.0
 
241 Tim Beckham (SEA - 3B,SS) 392 143 310 229.2 49.5 392.0
 
242 Alex Gordon (KC - LF,CF) 419 185 316 237.2 39.1 456.0 +37.0
 
243 Albert Pujols (LAA - 1B,DH) 404 113 289 230.9 26.2 362.0 -42.0
 
244 Yolmer Sanchez (CWS - 2B,3B) 407 140 369 232.2 43.1 578.0 +171.0
 
245 Alex Verdugo (LAD - LF,CF) 466 158 305 238.9 27.0 352.0 -114.0
Now that the Dodgers signed A.J. Pollock, it seems unlikely that Verdugo will make an impact in the majors until June. When he does, we are looking at a startable fantasy outfielder, but he isn't quite worth drafting in standard leagues as a stash and hold.
246 Jonathan Lucroy (LAA - C) 393 129 294 217.9 43.6 302.0 -91.0
 
247 Keon Broxton (NYM - CF) 461 135 323 242.2 48.4 440.0 -21.0
 
248 Yandy Diaz (TB - 3B) 426 127 285 221.9 34.4 394.0 -32.0
 
249 Todd Frazier (NYM - 3B) DL10 425 174 296 240.8 26.2 494.0 +69.0
Frazier is already a little banged up and has Peter Alonso breathing down his neck, but as long as he is in the lineup, you can expect a 25 homer, 10 stolen base pace, but with a lousy batting average that will bring your team down. Even still, he is a worthwhile depth piece in deeper leagues.
250 Scott Kingery (PHI - 3B,SS) DL10 433 166 293 241.1 31.5 400.0 -33.0
Kingery was dreadful last year. No one can deny that, but he is still young and offers 20/20 upside if his bat finds a way into the lineup at any number of positions. The is minimal risk at taking a chance on him late in drafts.
251 Freddy Galvis (TOR - SS) 457 141 341 237.0 38.3 614.0 +157.0
 
252 Eduardo Nunez (BOS - 2B,3B) DL10 416 113 307 229.9 36.6 384.0 -32.0
 
253 Raimel Tapia (COL - CF) 439 117 340 241.9 47.8 579.0 +140.0
 
254 Kolten Wong (STL - 2B) 469 163 317 248.8 25.1 480.0 +11.0
 
255 Renato Nunez (BAL - 3B) 436 143 338 228.2 49.0 588.0 +152.0
 
256 Carlos Gonzalez (CLE - RF) 515 137 325 230.6 34.0 405.0 -110.0
 
257 Chris Davis (BAL - 1B) 444 127 325 253.2 48.9 419.0 -25.0
 
258 David Fletcher (LAA - 2B,3B) 438 141 343 243.4 45.2 591.0 +153.0
 
259 Austin Hays (BAL - CF,RF) MiLB 462 153 332 250.3 40.7 596.0 +134.0
 
260 Chris Iannetta (COL - C) DL10 427 155 334 237.2 55.9 407.0 -20.0
There is reason to be excited about Tom Murphy, but as for now, Iannetta is the starter in Coors Field so don't hesitate to add him in two catcher leagues despite his lackluster batting averages.
261 Jake Cave (MIN - CF,RF) 430 152 340 246.7 39.9 433.0 +3.0
 
262 Steven Duggar (SF - CF,RF,DH) 452 106 286 239.6 32.5 477.0 +25.0
 
263 Billy McKinney (TOR - LF,RF) 478 198 290 240.1 25.2 594.0 +116.0
 
264 Troy Tulowitzki (NYY - SS) DL10 495 96 371 252.3 59.5 309.0 -186.0
 
265 Dustin Pedroia (BOS - 2B) DL10 470 179 310 251.1 35.7 410.0 -60.0
 
266 Carson Kelly (ARI - C) 447 149 313 237.2 45.5 562.0 +115.0
 
267 Mitch Garver (MIN - C) 435 168 332 247.6 40.0 447.0 +12.0
 
268 Isiah Kiner-Falefa (TEX - C,2B,3B) 431 164 326 249.5 40.5 339.0 -92.0
 
269 Hernan Perez (MIL - 2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 458 176 304 245.8 29.9 413.0 -45.0
Although Perez likely won't steal 34 bases like we saw in 2016, he is a sufficient source of speed late into drafts with enough at-bats that he'll add counting stats. There won't be much in the way of power, but his batting average won't kill you either.
270 Ji-Man Choi (TB - DH) DTD 448 28 350 246.0 50.4 415.0 -33.0
 
271 Dexter Fowler (STL - RF) 465 139 284 248.6 30.1 485.0 +20.0
 
272 Adam Duvall (ATL - 1B,LF) MiLB 480 177 322 249.0 45.0 470.0 -10.0
 
273 Brian McCann (ATL - C) 471 152 381 244.6 60.9 360.0 -111.0
If you are desperate at catcher, Brian McCann may be better than punting the position altogether. He does still have serviceable power, but he won't play often as the backup in Atlanta and his batting average will likely drag your team back.
274 Bradley Zimmer (CLE - CF) DL10 488 133 349 252.5 52.4 592.0 +104.0
 
275 Steve Pearce (BOS - 1B,LF,DH) 491 219 280 255.0 20.1 366.0 -125.0
 
276 Hunter Dozier (KC - 1B,3B,RF) 492 184 354 262.9 42.3 597.0 +105.0
 
277 Christian Vazquez (BOS - C) 476 163 388 269.5 67.8 427.0 -49.0
 
278 Matt Duffy (TB - 3B) DL10 479 154 300 258.1 24.8 483.0 +4.0
 
279 Colin Moran (PIT - 1B,3B) 482 164 300 255.5 42.2 575.0 +93.0
 
280 Elias Diaz (PIT - C) 486 135 355 258.2 52.5 554.0 +68.0
 
281 Lonnie Chisenhall (PIT - RF) DL10 525 184 321 269.8 40.2 638.0 +113.0
 
282 Grayson Greiner (DET - C) 493 160 376 258.7 50.5 434.0 -59.0
 
283 Tyler Naquin (CLE - LF,CF,RF) 496 207 381 282.6 55.2 537.0 +41.0
 
284 Nate Lowe (TB - 1B) MiLB 499 171 401 271.9 68.3 595.0 +96.0
 
285 Keston Hiura (MIL - 2B) MiLB 523 195 512 296.0 95.7 430.0 -93.0
 
286 Mikie Mahtook (DET - LF,RF) MiLB 506 225 364 280.9 33.5 722.0 +216.0
 
287 Mac Williamson (SF - LF) MiLB 519 205 333 275.0 32.3 639.0 +120.0
 
288 Chris Owings (KC - 2B,3B,CF,RF) 502 213 323 282.8 29.1 624.0 +122.0
 
289 Michael A. Taylor (WSH - CF) 518 202 296 263.8 26.9 488.0 -30.0
 
290 Russell Martin (LAD - C,3B) DL10 520 207 495 286.9 78.6 417.0 -103.0
 
291 Peter O'Brien (MIA - 1B) MiLB 509 156 362 265.8 56.4 615.0 +106.0
 
292 Matt Adams (WSH - 1B,LF) 514 197 314 265.4 37.4 425.0 -89.0
 
293 Martin Maldonado (KC - C) 559 199 357 279.3 49.0 489.0 -70.0
 
294 JaCoby Jones (DET - LF,CF) 513 188 344 271.8 39.3 680.0 +167.0
 
295 Jedd Gyorko (STL - 2B,3B) 538 170 319 277.4 34.8 635.0 +97.0
 
296 Franklin Barreto (OAK - 2B) MiLB 497 158 358 286.4 35.1 459.0 -38.0
 
297 J.P. Crawford (SEA - 3B,SS) MiLB 546 221 337 279.4 36.1 612.0 +66.0
 
298 Nick Williams (PHI - LF,RF) 547 128 331 272.8 35.2 493.0 -54.0
 
299 Neil Walker (MIA - 1B,2B,3B) 566 210 335 284.2 35.0 432.0 -134.0
 
300 Curtis Granderson (MIA - LF,RF,DH) 537 132 343 285.4 39.4 821.0 +284.0
 
301 Devon Travis (TOR - 2B) DL60 544 162 306 283.4 12.1 538.0 -6.0
 
302 Chance Sisco (BAL - C) MiLB 576 223 394 296.9 53.6 439.0 -137.0
 
303 Josh Phegley (OAK - C) 536 162 408 285.9 71.9 570.0 +34.0
 
304 Rowdy Tellez (TOR - 1B) 529 190 478 321.2 85.4 507.0 -22.0
 
305 Bo Bichette (TOR - SS) MiLB 555 176 494 311.4 80.6 365.0 -190.0
Bichette is an excellent prospect and has a polished bat with plenty of speed. With that said, Bichette has never played above Double-A and the Blue Jays have no need to rush him (see Vlad Jr. last year) so don't be surprised if he doesn't sniff the bigs until September.
306 Daniel Vogelbach (SEA - 1B,DH) 533 147 441 307.9 75.0 533.0
 
307 Jason Castro (MIN - C) 586 228 382 308.7 48.6 667.0 +81.0
 
308 Manny Pina (MIL - C) 604 208 440 314.1 60.2 423.0 -181.0
 
309 Brendan Rodgers (COL - SS) MiLB 573 172 521 326.9 78.1 437.0 -136.0
With the Rockies signing Daniel Murphy, Ryan McMahon shifted over to second base. This puts Rodgers even further away from the bigs, which is saying something because Garrett Hampson was already ahead of him. As it is now, Rodgers doesn't even make sense as a stash and hold in standard sized leagues.
310 Dustin Fowler (OAK - CF) MiLB 612 182 366 309.8 39.2 582.0 -30.0
 
311 Austin Wynns (BAL - C) MiLB 563 232 354 294.4 47.9 601.0 +38.0
 
312 Brandon Drury (TOR - 2B,3B) 545 176 378 312.1 43.7 518.0 -27.0
 
313 Addison Russell (CHC - SS) SUS 622 229 363 306.6 34.0 496.0 -126.0
Russell is starting the season on the DL and although he is a former top prospect, has never shown enough with the bat to warrant a draft and stash in standard-sized leagues. With that said, you can make a case for owning him in deeper formats.
314 James McCann (CWS - C) 603 177 545 339.3 90.3 504.0 -99.0
 
315 Kevin Plawecki (CLE - C) 595 206 392 310.8 49.8 536.0 -59.0
 
316 Austin Romine (NYY - C) 614 215 425 306.5 68.9 511.0 -103.0
 
317 Austin Dean (MIA - LF) MiLB 763 267 411 321.3 50.0 687.0 -76.0
 
318 Hanley Ramirez (CLE - 1B,DH) DFA 725 206 480 353.2 83.1 549.0 -176.0
 
319 Derek Dietrich (CIN - 1B,LF) 617 210 353 309.4 22.0 532.0 -85.0
 
320 Robbie Grossman (OAK - LF,RF,DH) 609 185 410 315.4 55.0 783.0 +174.0
 
321 Max Stassi (HOU - C) 769 228 387 324.9 54.9 462.0 -307.0
 
322 Alen Hanson (TOR - 2B,3B,SS,LF) 581 197 353 307.3 29.7 619.0 +38.0
 
323 Yangervis Solarte (SF - 2B,3B,SS) 591 219 341 307.0 22.9 604.0 +13.0
 
324 Gerardo Parra (SF - LF,RF) 648 189 398 320.8 52.5 520.0 -128.0
 
325 Yairo Munoz (STL - 3B,SS,CF) 727 232 409 322.0 43.6 476.0 -251.0
 
326 Aledmys Diaz (HOU - 3B,SS) 556 202 314 302.0 18.6 566.0 +10.0
 
327 Tyler Austin (SF - 1B,DH) 540 203 445 318.5 68.5 626.0 +86.0
 
328 Roman Quinn (PHI - LF,CF) 1030 232 410 324.0 63.0 569.0 -461.0
 
329 Jordy Mercer (DET - SS) DL10 699 232 397 312.5 46.4 695.0 -4.0
 
330 Jeff Mathis (TEX - C) 607 257 423 318.0 58.2    
 
331 Tyler Saladino (MIL - SS) MiLB 597 214 606 371.5 134.0 869.0 +272.0
 
332 Brian Goodwin (LAA - LF,CF,RF) 564 242 404 314.8 45.7 714.0 +150.0
 
333 Christian Arroyo (TB - 2B,3B) MiLB 571 201 662 401.3 168.7 675.0 +104.0
 
334 Erik Gonzalez (PIT - 1B,2B,3B,SS) DL60 635 210 384 322.6 47.3 688.0 +53.0
 
335 Blake Swihart (ARI - C,1B,LF,RF,DH) MiLB 655 208 394 326.9 46.3 372.0 -283.0
 
336 JT Riddle (MIA - SS) MiLB 608 238 362 311.2 27.7 733.0 +125.0
 
337 Logan Morrison (NYY - 1B,DH) MiLB 689 220 400 325.0 59.0 836.0 +147.0
 
338 Derek Fisher (HOU - LF,CF) MiLB 654 207 547 378.0 102.4 778.0 +124.0
 
339 Richard Rodriguez (SS) MiLB 542 207 386 302.8 65.0 737.0 +195.0
 
340 Dylan Moore (SEA - SS) 628 146 515 377.8 152.7 1,006.0 +378.0
 
341 Matt Wieters (STL - C) 761 229 502 354.7 84.2 548.0 -213.0
 
342 Phillip Ervin (CIN - LF,RF) MiLB 641 164 398 329.9 53.3 563.0 -78.0
 
343 Matt Davidson (TEX - 1B,3B,DH) MiLB 587 227 401 330.6 48.1 694.0 +107.0
 
344 Clint Frazier (NYY - LF) 709 222 443 350.8 58.6 497.0 -212.0
 
345 Austin Slater (SF - LF) MiLB 774 272 425 343.8 64.5 736.0 -38.0
 
346 Aaron Altherr (PHI - CF,RF) 632 236 397 337.0 40.8 610.0 -22.0
 
347 Victor Caratini (CHC - C,1B) DL10 712 226 418 335.4 50.9 519.0 -193.0
 
348 Jon Jay (CWS - LF,CF,RF,DH) DL10 678 221 396 333.4 39.1 719.0 +41.0
 
349 Kevan Smith (LAA - C) 731 211 432 350.9 65.5 685.0 -46.0
 
350 Dwight Smith Jr. (BAL - LF) DTD 1264 156 568 439.0 165.3 937.0 -327.0
 
351 Jordan Luplow (CLE - LF,RF) MiLB 684 231 410 344.9 48.3 758.0 +74.0
 
352 Daniel Robertson (TB - 2B,3B,SS) 762 283 407 324.2 50.1 500.0 -262.0
 
353 Joey Rickard (BAL - LF,CF,RF) 657 261 427 335.8 55.6 652.0 -5.0
 
354 Brett Phillips (KC - CF) MiLB 554 209 350 317.8 20.5 611.0 +57.0
 
355 DJ Stewart (BAL - LF) MiLB 610 187 361 321.2 46.2 672.0 +62.0
 
356 Tom Murphy (SEA - C) 658 213 532 352.9 85.9 534.0 -124.0
 
357 Pablo Reyes (PIT - RF) 584 139 514 376.4 114.3 792.0 +208.0
 
358 Roberto Perez (CLE - C) 700 239 460 351.7 67.3 482.0 -218.0
 
359 J.D. Davis (NYM - 1B,3B) 543 101 505 378.2 105.1 559.0 +16.0
 
360 Christian Walker (ARI - 1B) 649 192 403 329.8 72.9 557.0 -92.0
 
361 Logan Forsythe (TEX - 2B,3B) 695 258 550 378.5 103.3 712.0 +17.0
 
362 Hunter Pence (TEX - LF,RF) 1119 203 445 347.8 82.4 627.0 -492.0
 
363 Magneuris Sierra (MIA - CF,RF) MiLB 747 257 452 351.4 52.6 776.0 +29.0
 
364 Meibrys Viloria (KC - C) MiLB 651 198 565 369.8 118.3    
 
365 Nick Hundley (OAK - C) 797 199 468 362.0 87.9 561.0 -236.0
 
366 Nick Martini (OAK - LF) DL10 639 205 434 337.2 49.9 717.0 +78.0
 
367 Anthony Alford (TOR - LF) MiLB 676 193 631 432.3 168.2 786.0 +110.0
 
368 Adam Engel (CWS - CF) 630 230 363 330.0 27.6 690.0 +60.0
 
369 Travis Jankowski (SD - LF,CF,RF) DL60 707 201 415 348.2 60.5 441.0 -266.0
 
370 Tony Wolters (COL - C) 720 235 458 349.0 65.6 890.0 +170.0
 
371 Jo Adell (LAA - OF) MiLB 650 216 359 314.5 57.4 560.0 -90.0
 
372 Francisco Pena (STL - C) NRI 656 206 671 402.5 168.9    
 
373 Lucas Duda (KC - 1B,DH) 839 224 439 352.2 74.9 811.0 -28.0
 
374 Mark Canha (OAK - 1B,LF,CF,RF) 669 276 368 334.6 32.7 630.0 -39.0
 
375 Andrew Knapp (PHI - C) 672 222 618 385.6 129.3 853.0 +181.0
 
376 Jorge Bonifacio (KC - LF,RF) MiLB 653 237 413 344.7 46.5 751.0 +98.0
 
377 Adolis Garcia (STL - RF) MiLB 670 213 589 424.8 149.7    
 
378 Travis d'Arnaud (NYM - C) 784 227 433 354.0 53.4 545.0 -239.0
 
379 Garrett Cooper (MIA - LF) DL10 715 198 405 350.8 62.3 747.0 +32.0
 
380 Mark Reynolds (COL - 1B) 677 229 460 353.8 74.4 642.0 -35.0
 
381 Alex Avila (ARI - C) DL10 751 241 424 356.7 47.5 772.0 +21.0
 
382 Curt Casali (CIN - C) 693 242 596 387.6 116.4 867.0 +174.0
 
383 Jesus Sucre (BAL - C) 717 230 513 383.0 101.0    
 
384 Tony Kemp (HOU - LF,CF) 759 244 373 335.0 36.9 522.0 -237.0
 
385 David Freese (LAD - 1B,3B) 619 263 408 342.3 39.1 525.0 -94.0
 
386 Oscar Mercado (CLE - CF) MiLB 716 238 594 422.8 125.0 691.0 -25.0
 
387 Cameron Maybin (LF,CF,RF) MiLB 661 305 463 350.0 65.5 608.0 -53.0
 
388 Dominic Smith (NYM - 1B,LF) 705 290 555 392.7 98.3 502.0 -203.0
 
389 Aramis Garcia (SF - C) MiLB 743 244 556 408.6 106.7 784.0 +41.0
 
390 Rafael Ortega (ATL - LF,CF) MiLB 813 248 508 395.3 108.9    
 
391 Christian Villanueva (3B) FA 704 272 400 343.3 48.3 606.0 -98.0
 
392 Spencer Kieboom (WSH - C) MiLB 708 254 645 424.5 141.4 815.0 +107.0
 
393 Jordan Patterson (TOR - 1B,RF) MiLB 842 254 624 439.3 151.1    
 
394 Richie Martin (BAL - SS) 766 289 413 345.2 37.5 602.0 -164.0
 
395 Jose Briceno (LAA - C,DH) MiLB 710 256 617 403.0 132.2    
 
396 Brock Holt (BOS - 2B,SS,RF) DL10 606 196 415 352.0 38.6 435.0 -171.0
 
397 Carlos Gomez (NYM - RF) MiLB 683 281 453 371.0 61.5 692.0 +9.0
 
398 Nicky Delmonico (CWS - LF) MiLB 616 291 412 356.2 41.9 530.0 -86.0
 
399 Michael Perez (TB - C) 738 262 465 369.3 73.8 757.0 +19.0
 
400 Pedro Severino (BAL - C) 726 265 679 431.3 151.9 1,008.0 +282.0
 
401 Patrick Wisdom (TEX - 3B) 589 168 484 368.0 66.1 702.0 +113.0
 
402 Mike Tauchman (NYY - CF,RF) 1048 270 494 425.4 82.4 823.0 -225.0
 
403 Alex Kirilloff (MIN - RF) MiLB   273 347 310.0 37.0 565.0  
 
404 Juan Lagares (NYM - CF) 688 260 459 369.7 48.4 720.0 +32.0
 
405 Brandon Guyer (CWS - LF,RF) MiLB 735 274 601 462.0 135.1    
 
406 Sandy Leon (BOS - C) 851 187 518 376.3 64.9 655.0 -196.0
 
407 Yordan Alvarez (HOU - LF) MiLB 787 225 423 359.2 42.7 730.0 -57.0
 
408 Jose Pirela (SD - 1B,2B,LF,RF) 685 311 438 371.8 45.7 491.0 -194.0
 
409 Kaleb Cowart (LAA - 2B,3B) MiLB 771 278 633 473.6 133.9 994.0 +223.0
 
410 John Ryan Murphy (ARI - C) 739 280 575 405.2 88.6 920.0 +181.0
 
411 Chris Shaw (SF - LF) MiLB 740 305 469 392.8 65.9 762.0 +22.0
 
412 Alcides Escobar (SS,CF) FA 745 283 444 386.5 61.5 676.0 -69.0
 
413 Taylor Ward (LAA - 3B) MiLB 673 281 412 372.8 46.3 674.0 +1.0
 
414 Jake Marisnick (HOU - CF) 805 304 446 376.3 60.8 547.0 -258.0
 
415 Caleb Joseph (ARI - C) 753 285 670 429.8 128.2 1,021.0 +268.0
 
416 Melky Cabrera (PIT - RF) 644 264 468 386.0 57.8 571.0 -73.0
 
417 Jose Iglesias (CIN - SS) 892 266 416 367.0 38.5 529.0 -363.0
 
418 Denard Span (LF) FA 867 306 358 332.0 21.2 742.0 -125.0
 
419 Stevie Wilkerson (BAL - IF) MiLB 785 290 650 468.8 131.3    
 
420 Charlie Tilson (CWS - LF,CF) MiLB 932 290 599 425.5 95.6 797.0 -135.0
 
421 Rio Ruiz (BAL - 3B) 1152 290 474 403.7 81.1    
 
422 Alex Blandino (CIN - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 780 293 548 437.5 94.8    
 
423 Brandon Barnes (CLE - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 1188 293 492 404.7 83.0    
 
424 Wilmer Difo (WSH - 2B,3B) 690 298 389 354.4 28.5 535.0 -155.0
 
425 Kevin Newman (PIT - SS) DL10 806 315 427 359.8 38.8 682.0 -124.0
 
426 Cavan Biggio (TOR - 2B) NRI 778 300 451 397.8 51.4 616.0 -162.0
 
427 Austin Riley (ATL - 3B) MiLB 832 318 500 407.2 71.9 508.0 -324.0
 
428 Victor Victor Mesa (MIA - OF) NRI 810 306 456 402.3 57.3 564.0 -246.0
 
429 Yasmany Tomas (ARI - LF,RF) MiLB 828 327 436 363.7 51.1 734.0 -94.0
 
430 Daz Cameron (DET - CF) MiLB 814 309 431 378.0 44.1 703.0 -111.0
 
431 Nick Gordon (MIN - SS) MiLB 732 310 617 444.5 113.6 586.0 -146.0
 
432 Brad Miller (1B,2B,SS,DH) FA 808 265 479 396.8 55.5 546.0 -262.0
 
433 Miguel Rojas (MIA - 1B,3B,SS) 1172 327 476 374.5 59.6 641.0 -531.0
 
434 Cam Gallagher (KC - C) 1105 324 443 386.0 53.0 749.0 -356.0
 
435 Ben Gamel (MIL - LF,RF) 834 323 438 387.0 40.0 568.0 -266.0
 
436 Carter Kieboom (WSH - SS) MiLB 773 324 657 424.8 108.7 707.0 -66.0
 
437 Preston Tucker (CWS - LF,RF) MiLB 855 324 558 469.8 96.6 905.0 +50.0
 
438 Jarrod Dyson (ARI - CF,RF) 714 277 403 362.5 22.7 632.0 -82.0
 
439 Pat Valaika (COL - 1B,2B) 798 329 487 418.8 61.7    
 
440 Royce Lewis (MIN - SS) MiLB   331 420 375.5 44.5 645.0  
 
441 Brent Rooker (MIN - 1B,LF) MiLB 976 332 455 386.7 51.1 1,034.0 +58.0
 
442 AJ Reed (HOU - 1B) MiLB 826 340 520 422.4 71.8 761.0 -65.0
 
443 Leury Garcia (CWS - 2B,LF,CF,RF) 730 306 392 361.8 18.4 689.0 -41.0
 
444 Luke Maile (TOR - C) 874 334 633 431.6 107.4 760.0 -114.0
 
445 Anthony Garcia (SF - RF) MiLB 1171 335 506 438.7 74.4    
 
446 Jonathan Davis (TOR - OF) DL10 890 336 576 449.3 107.3    
 
447 David Freitas (MIL - C) MiLB 1175 336 488 434.3 69.6 793.0 -382.0
 
448 Andrew Knizner (STL - C) MiLB 1200 337 628 463.3 112.9 856.0 -344.0
 
449 Mauricio Dubon (MIL - SS) MiLB 633 173 574 437.0 79.3 860.0 +227.0
 
450 David Bote (CHC - 2B,3B) 722 262 451 387.0 36.6 517.0 -205.0
 
451 Daniel Descalso (CHC - 1B,2B,3B) 905 344 448 368.6 39.9 541.0 -364.0
 
452 Chris Herrmann (OAK - C) DL60 827 327 533 410.8 61.7 865.0 +38.0
 
453 Martin Prado (MIA - 3B) 723 296 409 379.6 22.2 613.0 -110.0
 
454 Tyler Wade (NYY - 2B) 910 346 564 460.3 79.0 770.0 -140.0
 
455 Cory Spangenberg (MIL - 2B,3B,LF) MiLB 765 269 470 416.6 37.1 589.0 -176.0
 
456 Jose Osuna (PIT - 1B,3B,RF) DL10 711 283 512 430.2 60.5 820.0 +109.0
 
457 Andrew Toles (LAD - CF) MiLB 770 291 475 428.4 34.9 553.0 -217.0
 
458 Ehire Adrianza (MIN - 1B,3B,SS) 721 292 463 424.4 30.1 735.0 +14.0
 
459 Charlie Culberson (ATL - 3B,SS,LF) 736 315 442 391.8 28.7 510.0 -226.0
 
460 Myles Straw (HOU - RF) MiLB 779 327 498 432.0 43.0 634.0 -145.0
 
461 Dawel Lugo (DET - 2B) MiLB 925 352 586 486.5 93.1 1,024.0 +99.0
 
462 Esteban Quiroz (SD - SS) MiLB 927 353 450 415.7 44.4    
 
463 Yusniel Diaz (BAL - CF,RF) MiLB 957 354 469 410.3 51.2 713.0 -244.0
 
464 Reese McGuire (TOR - C) MiLB 1182 356 579 473.7 91.5    
 
465 Howie Kendrick (WSH - 2B,LF) 941 361 477 406.0 43.9 552.0 -389.0
 
466 Andres Gimenez (NYM - SS) MiLB   362 405 383.5 21.5 984.0  
 
467 Erik Kratz (SF - C) 1189 367 688 492.8 121.2 740.0 -449.0
 
468 Harold Castro (DET - 2B,CF) NRI 1173 368 618 487.7 102.3    
 
469 Jorge Mateo (OAK - SS) MiLB 1312 369 647 561.8 112.0 833.0 -479.0
 
470 Paulo Orlando (LAD - CF) MiLB 972 372 549 478.5 71.7    
 
471 Michael Chavis (BOS - 3B) 1260 374 651 529.5 100.2 577.0 -683.0
 
472 Ke'Bryan Hayes (PIT - 3B) MiLB 1328 375 647 574.8 115.5 798.0 -530.0
 
473 Keibert Ruiz (LAD - C) MiLB 938 376 656 442.2 98.8 759.0 -179.0
 
474 Rajai Davis (NYM - LF,CF,DH) NRI 1273 377 673 528.0 109.6 654.0 -619.0
 
475 Chad Wallach (MIA - C) 1196 380 560 480.0 74.8    
 
476 Rene Rivera (NYM - C) MiLB 1199 383 655 513.7 111.3 832.0 -367.0
 
477 Michael Hermosillo (LAA - LF,CF,RF) DL10 994 383 540 462.8 55.8 841.0 -153.0
 
478 Max Moroff (CLE - 2B) 1174 384 478 443.0 42.0 806.0 -368.0
 
479 Zack Collins (CWS - C) MiLB 1234 385 684 507.5 116.4 789.0 -445.0
 
480 Devin Mesoraco (NYM - C) 1206 388 690 495.0 122.8 708.0 -498.0
 
481 Stephen Vogt (SF - C,1B) MiLB 1205 389 524 457.5 59.6 754.0 -451.0
 
482 Sam Travis (BOS - LF) MiLB 1001 390 572 490.5 71.8 995.0 -6.0
 
483 Taylor Motter (DET - RF) MiLB 1176 391 557 476.0 67.8 974.0 -202.0
 
484 Bobby Wilson (DET - C) MiLB 1207 393 653 519.0 106.3    
 
485 Jett Bandy (TEX - C) MiLB 1209 396 603 504.0 84.7    
 
486 Bryan Holaday (C) FA 1210 397 652 521.0 104.2 956.0 -254.0
 
487 Tony Renda (BOS - 2B,3B,LF) 1177 397 573 483.7 71.9    
 
488 Jacob Stallings (PIT - C) DL10 1211 398 683 532.0 117.0 900.0 -311.0
 
489 Raffy Lopez (ATL - C) MiLB 1212 399 676 530.3 113.5    
 
490 Victor Reyes (DET - LF,RF,DH) MiLB 1014 399 459 426.5 27.7    
 
491 Zack Granite (TEX - CF) MiLB 1017 400 638 507.5 88.7    
 
492 Joe McCarthy (TB - 1B,LF) MiLB 1020 401 626 506.0 84.2    
 
493 Jose Siri (CIN - CF) MiLB 1178 402 569 484.3 68.2    
 
494 Jose Trevino (TEX - C) MiLB 1214 402 518 467.7 48.6 971.0 -243.0
 
495 Sean Murphy (OAK - C) MiLB   403 619 511.0 108.0 701.0  
 
496 Austin Listi (PHI - OF) MiLB 1051 403 468 429.0 28.1    
 
497 Jarrett Parker (LAA - LF,RF) MiLB 1179 404 619 502.0 88.8    
 
498 Kevin Kramer (PIT - 3B) MiLB 1026 404 527 468.5 44.1    
 
499 Tomas Nido (NYM - C) MiLB 1217 406 668 531.7 107.2 976.0 -241.0
 
500 Ryan Mountcastle (BAL - SS) MiLB   407 552 479.5 72.5 726.0  
 
501 Ryan Lavarnway (NYY - C,1B) NRI 1184 407 488 439.7 34.9    
 
502 Alex Dickerson (SD - LF,RF) MiLB 1033 408 595 496.0 69.1    
 
503 Kyle Higashioka (NYY - C) 1219 409 677 536.3 109.8 916.0 -303.0
 
504 Justin Williams (STL - RF) DL10 1180 409 626 506.3 90.0    
 
505 Jason Martin (PIT - LF,CF) 1035 409 546 479.0 49.8    
 
506 Drew Jackson (BAL - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1181 410 485 453.7 31.8 866.0 -315.0
 
507 Eric Haase (CLE - C) MiLB 1222 411 651 529.3 98.0    
 
508 Edmundo Sosa (STL - SS) MiLB 1075 411 646 489.8 93.0 1,035.0 -40.0
 
509 T.J. Rivera (2B,3B) FA 1042 411 587 487.7 73.6    
 
510 Tim Locastro (ARI - CF) MiLB 1045 412 577 499.8 64.7    
 
511 Jose Lobaton (SEA - C) MiLB 1224 413 692 544.3 114.5    
 
512 Seby Zavala (CWS - C) MiLB 1225 414 661 534.7 100.9    
 
513 Cameron Rupp (DET - C) MiLB 1218 415 522 471.0 43.8 800.0 -418.0
 
514 Garrett Stubbs (HOU - C) MiLB 1226 416 685 543.7 110.2    
 
515 Jacob Nottingham (MIL - C) MiLB 1227 417 667 538.3 102.2 830.0 -397.0
 
516 Hector Sanchez (DET - C) MiLB 1229 418 654 535.0 96.4    
 
517 Pablo Sandoval (SF - 1B,3B) 1213 418 517 474.5 37.1 649.0 -564.0
 
518 Joe Hudson (STL - C) MiLB 1231 419 657 537.0 97.2    
 
519 Dylan Cozens (PHI - LF) MiLB 1058 420 663 526.0 92.1 880.0 -178.0
 
520 Scott Heineman (TEX - OF) DL60 1183 420 582 496.3 66.5    
 
521 Taylor Davis (CHC - 1B,3B) 1232 420 551 502.3 58.5 955.0 -277.0
 
522 Nick Ciuffo (TB - C) 1233 421 687 548.3 108.9    
 
523 Cole Tucker (PIT - SS) 1063 421 624 527.5 84.4 847.0 -216.0
 
524 Lane Thomas (STL - OF) 1065 422 654 496.5 92.6 1,004.0 -61.0
 
525 Yonathan Daza (COL - CF,RF) MiLB 1068 423 575 495.3 55.6    
 
526 Austin Allen (SD - C) MiLB 1237 425 569 511.7 62.3 1,041.0 -196.0
 
527 Cristhian Adames (CHC - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1185 426 662 525.7 99.8    
 
528 Rocky Gale (LAD - C) 1238 426 660 542.7 95.5    
 
529 Beau Taylor (OAK - C) 1239 427 666 545.3 97.6    
 
530 Noel Cuevas (COL - LF,RF) DL10 1186 427 490 458.3 25.7 927.0 -259.0
 
531 Brett Nicholas (CWS - C) MiLB 1197 428 501 459.3 30.7 1,030.0 -167.0
 
532 Tommy La Stella (LAA - 2B,3B) 1187 428 491 457.7 25.8    
 
533 Isan Diaz (MIA - 2B,SS) MiLB   430 678 554.0 124.0 941.0  
 
534 Raudy Read (WSH - C) MiLB 1241 430 639 538.0 85.5    
 
535 Andrew Susac (BAL - C) MiLB 1242 431 686 554.3 104.3 877.0 -365.0
 
536 Jose Rondon (CWS - 2B,SS,DH) 1190 431 502 475.7 31.8    
 
537 Ramon Torres (KC - 3B) FA 1191 433 666 531.3 98.5    
 
538 Luis Torrens (SD - C) MiLB 1245 433 659 547.0 92.3    
 
539 Juan Graterol (CIN - C) NRI 1247 435 571 519.0 60.0    
 
540 Gorkys Hernandez (BOS - LF,CF) NRI 1192 435 496 468.0 25.2 773.0 -419.0
 
541 Alex Jackson (ATL - C,RF) MiLB 1248 436 681 556.3 100.1    
 
542 Yadiel Rivera (MIA - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB   436 673 554.5 118.5    
 
543 Tim Federowicz (CIN - C) MiLB 1249 437 580 523.3 62.0    
 
544 Chris Stewart (SD - C) MiLB 1252 439 599 531.3 67.6    
 
545 Billy Burns (NYY - CF) NRI 1193 442 570 503.0 52.4 728.0 -465.0
 
546 John Andreoli (MIN - LF) MiLB 1194 443 607 516.0 68.2    
 
547 Braxton Lee (NYM - RF) MiLB 1195 446 649 531.3 86.0    
 
548 Troy Stokes Jr. (MIL - OF) MiLB 1198 450 620 524.0 71.1    
 
549 Lane Adams (PHI - RF) MiLB 1201 452 527 494.7 31.5    
 
550 Kelby Tomlinson (ARI - 2B,SS) NRI 1202 453 606 521.7 63.4    
 
551 Ildemaro Vargas (ARI - 2B) 1203 454 511 490.7 26.0    
 
552 Johnny Field (CHC - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 1204 455 588 517.0 54.7 1,020.0 -184.0
 
553 Ronny Rodriguez (DET - 2B,3B,SS) 1220 455 524 485.3 28.8 756.0 -464.0
 
554 Guillermo Heredia (TB - LF,CF) 1262 461 587 538.0 55.1 816.0 -446.0
 
555 Pedro Alvarez (MIA - 3B,DH) NRI 1208 461 554 509.0 38.0    
 
556 Greg Garcia (SD - 2B,3B,SS) 1254 464 558 510.3 38.4    
 
557 Socrates Brito (TOR - RF) 1221 470 525 491.0 24.3 922.0 -299.0
 
558 Matt Joyce (ATL - LF) 1257 471 561 516.3 36.7 845.0 -412.0
 
559 Ezequiel Carrera (LAD - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 1215 471 519 499.0 20.4    
 
560 Zach Vincej (BAL - SS) MiLB 1216 474 636 543.3 68.2    
 
561 Brandon Dixon (DET - 1B,RF) 1243 474 547 506.7 30.3    
 
562 Rosell Herrera (MIA - 2B,3B,CF,RF) 1269 475 629 559.0 63.6 999.0 -270.0
 
563 Jacoby Ellsbury (NYY - CF) DL60 1223 479 527 505.0 19.8 658.0 -565.0
 
564 Pete Kozma (DET - 3B,SS) NRI   484 679 581.5 97.5    
 
565 Eric Young Jr. (BAL - LF,CF) MiLB 1228 485 532 511.0 19.5    
 
566 Mike Freeman (CLE - SS) 1230 486 547 522.3 26.2    
 
567 Jim Adduci (CHC - 1B,RF) MiLB 1276 489 580 549.0 42.4    
 
568 Drew Ferguson (SF - CF) MiLB 1277 490 594 555.0 46.3    
 
569 Bobby Bradley (CLE - 1B) MiLB 1235 491 593 541.0 41.7    
 
570 Anthony Santander (BAL - LF,RF) MiLB 1274 492 578 541.3 36.2    
 
571 Ty France (SD - IF) MiLB 1236 493 623 552.0 53.7 662.0 -574.0
 
572 Hanser Alberto (BAL - SS) 1280 495 584 550.7 39.6    
 
573 Chase d'Arnaud (TEX - 2B,3B) NRI 1240 498 608 550.0 45.1    
 
574 Carlos Tocci (TEX - CF) MiLB 1244 500 548 526.0 19.8    
 
575 Adrian Gonzalez (NYM - 1B) FA 1246 503 660 571.0 65.8 960.0 -286.0
 
576 Drew Robinson (STL - 2B,CF) MiLB 1284 504 614 568.7 46.9 819.0 -465.0
 
577 Michael Reed (SF - LF,CF) MiLB 1285 505 630 574.7 52.0 901.0 -384.0
 
578 Kyle Farmer (CIN - 3B) 1250 506 554 525.7 20.5 915.0 -335.0
 
579 Josh Fuentes (COL - IF) MiLB 1251 507 562 541.3 24.4    
 
580 Mason Williams (CIN - CF) MiLB 1253 508 560 541.7 23.8 1,026.0 -227.0
 
581 Luis Basabe (CWS - CF) MiLB 1255 510 609 559.3 40.4    
 
582 Mitch Walding (PHI - 3B) 1287 510 602 567.7 41.0 967.0 -320.0
 
583 Ben Revere (TEX - LF,CF) FA 1256 516 560 540.0 18.2 884.0 -372.0
 
584 Andrew Stevenson (WSH - LF,RF) MiLB 1289 519 593 565.0 32.8 985.0 -304.0
 
585 Terrance Gore (KC - LF,DH) 1294 520 612 576.7 40.5 567.0 -727.0
 
586 Kevin Cron (ARI - IF) MiLB 1258 521 592 558.3 29.1 750.0 -508.0
 
587 Ronald Torreyes (MIN - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1297 522 610 577.7 39.5 765.0 -532.0
 
588 Ryder Jones (SF - 1B,3B) MiLB 1299 524 634 587.0 46.3 930.0 -369.0
 
589 Cliff Pennington (NYY - 3B) MiLB   525 676 600.5 75.5    
 
590 Jace Peterson (BAL - 2B,3B,LF,RF) NRI 1271 526 575 550.0 20.0 825.0 -446.0
 
591 Blake Trahan (CIN - IF) MiLB 1259 528 650 580.3 51.3    
 
592 Connor Joe (SF - LF) MiLB 1301 528 621 584.7 40.6    
 
593 Ryan Flaherty (CLE - 3B) MiLB 1303 529 664 600.0 55.3    
 
594 Mark Zagunis (CHC - RF) 1261 530 565 544.0 15.1 878.0 -383.0
 
595 Willi Castro (DET - 2B,SS) MiLB 1263 531 613 570.3 33.6 1,025.0 -238.0
 
596 Adeiny Hechavarria (NYM - SS) MiLB 1305 533 682 608.0 60.8 799.0 -506.0
 
597 Isaac Galloway (MIA - CF,DH) 1292 534 596 572.0 27.2    
 
598 Boog Powell (OAK - CF) MiLB 1265 537 629 578.3 38.1    
 
599 Breyvic Valera (SF - 2B) MiLB 1308 538 627 592.3 38.9 893.0 -415.0
 
600 Andrew Velazquez (TB - SS) 1266 538 614 574.0 31.2    
 
601 Luis Rengifo (LAA - IF) MiLB 1267 541 571 553.3 12.8 745.0 -522.0
 
602 Patrick Kivlehan (PIT - LF) MiLB 1282 542 586 565.0 18.0    
 
603 Tyrone Taylor (MIL - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 1268 543 572 553.3 13.2    
 
604 Nolan Fontana (TEX - 2B) NRI 1270 546 637 585.7 38.1    
 
605 Chris Bostick (BAL - 2B,LF) MiLB 1313 550 669 612.0 48.7    
 
606 Matthew Szczur (ARI - LF,RF) MiLB 1315 551 649 606.3 41.0    
 
607 Nick Franklin (PIT - 2B) MiLB 1272 553 664 597.7 47.8    
 
608 Dalton Pompey (TOR - LF) DL60 1288 553 592 575.3 16.4 738.0 -550.0
 
609 Ryan Cordell (CWS - CF,RF) 1318 555 665 614.0 45.3    
 
610 Gregor Blanco (NYM - LF,CF) NRI 1275 557 630 588.7 30.6    
 
611 Mike Gerber (SF - LF) MiLB 1304 558 608 588.7 21.9    
 
612 Sean Rodriguez (PHI - 2B,SS,LF,CF) MiLB 1319 561 640 608.0 34.0 897.0 -422.0
 
613 Nick Solak (TB - 2B) MiLB 1278 563 653 599.3 38.7 948.0 -330.0
 
614 Richard Urena (TOR - SS) 1279 564 596 581.0 13.1    
 
615 Jack Reinheimer (BAL - LF) MiLB 1281 566 600 583.7 13.9 874.0 -407.0
 
616 Shed Long (CIN - 2B) MiLB 1291 566 595 582.0 12.0 892.0 -399.0
 
617 Andy Young (ARI - IF) MiLB 1321 568 636 609.7 29.8    
 
618 Peter Bourjos (LAA - LF) 1283 570 605 587.3 14.3 887.0 -396.0
 
619 JB Shuck (PIT - LF,CF,RF) 1323 572 689 629.3 47.8    
 
620 Gordon Beckham (DET - 2B) 1286 577 640 602.3 27.2    
 
621 Tzu-Wei Lin (BOS - SS) 1293 578 597 588.0 7.8 787.0 -506.0
 
622 Adrian Sanchez (WSH - 2B) MiLB 1295 580 599 589.7 7.8    
 
623 Joey Curletta (SEA - RF) MiLB 1310 581 614 602.0 14.9    
 
624 Ramon Urias (STL - IF) MiLB 1314 583 620 607.0 17.0    
 
625 Braden Bishop (SEA - CF) MiLB 1306 584 610 599.7 11.3    
 
626 Cheslor Cuthbert (KC - 1B,3B,DH) MiLB 1290 584 602 593.3 7.4    
 
627 Shane Robinson (PHI - RF) NRI 1296 590 600 593.7 4.5    
 
628 Corban Joseph (OAK - 1B,2B) MiLB 1300 591 604 597.3 5.3    
 
629 Abiatal Avelino (SF - IF) MiLB 1298 592 604 599.3 5.2    
 
630 Kelvin Gutierrez (KC - 3B) MiLB 1302 598 655 619.7 25.2    
 
631 Gio Urshela (NYY - 3B,SS) 1309 598 613 606.7 6.3    
 
632 Gregorio Petit (PHI - 2B,SS) NRI 1317 603 623 615.7 9.0    
 
633 Luis Guillorme (NYM - 3B) MiLB 1307 607 611 609.3 1.7 957.0 -350.0
 
634 Domingo Leyba (ARI - SS) MiLB   608 675 641.5 33.5    
 
635 Pedro Florimon (PHI - SS) MiLB 1324 611 641 626.7 12.3    
 
636 Bryan Reynolds (PIT - CF) 1330 612 674 640.0 25.7    
 
637 Edwin Rios (LAD - 1B) MiLB 1311 613 622 616.7 3.9 962.0 -349.0
 
638 Matt Thaiss (LAA - 1B) MiLB 1329 616 658 635.7 17.2 810.0 -519.0
 
639 Emilio Bonifacio (TB - 2B,3B,LF) MiLB 1316 620 627 623.0 2.9 876.0 -440.0
 
640 Sergio Alcantara (DET - SS) MiLB 1331 621 675 643.7 22.9    
 
641 Eric Sogard (TOR - 2B,SS) 1320 624 661 640.0 15.5    
 
642 Jake Smolinski (TB - CF) NRI 1322 626 637 631.7 4.5    
 
643 Marco Hernandez (BOS - 2B,3B) D10 1325 629 659 643.3 12.3    
 
644 Eric Stamets (CLE - SS) MiLB 1326 630 643 637.3 5.4 1,001.0 -325.0
 
645 Dustin Peterson (DET - 3B,LF) 1327 631 646 636.0 7.1    
 
646 Yu Chang (CLE - SS) MiLB   644 671 657.5 13.5 780.0