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2022 Fantasy Baseball Rankings

Expert Consensus Ranking (46 of 46 Experts) -

Rank Player (Team, Position) Overall Notes
1 Juan Soto (SD - RF) 2 1 1 1.0 0.0 3.0 +1.0
Ahh, the Juan Soto conundrum. Soto is one of the best hitters in baseball. At 23 years old, he's on a Hall of Fame trajectory. His raw power is astounding. But he plays for the suddenly terrible and powerless Washington Nationals. A few years removed from the World Series, the team is now a collection of "That guy is still playing?" and "Never heard of him" types. Soto's HR numbers will be huge, but his R and RBI numbers will take a big hit.
2 Bryce Harper (PHI - DH,RF) 6 2 5 2.5 0.9 7.0 +1.0
Mr. Consistency. Draft Harper somewhere between 6 and 10 in the first round, leave him in the lineup and count your blessings. In one of the quietest MVP campaigns in recent memory, Harper did Harper-like things in 2021, with 35 homers, 101 runs, 84 RBI and 13 stolen bases. With the Phillies adding Nick Castellanos to provide Harper with some lineup protection, a 100 RBI season with 110 runs is probably Harper's floor.
3 Mookie Betts (LAD - 2B,CF,RF) 9 2 7 3.9 1.3 11.0 +2.0
If Betts is healthy, he's an automatic NL MVP candidate. He played through back and hip injuries last year that limited his effectiveness. Reports are that Betts is healthy and ready to resume his spot amongst the game's elite. If he has 2B eligibility in your league, he's even more valuable. If Betts slides to 8, 9, 10 in the first round, snatch him up. If he adds 20 steals to his usually impressive R/HR/RBI tallies, he's going to be in the running for the overall No. 1 player at season's end.
4 Mike Trout (LAA - CF) DTD 10 2 8 4.6 1.4 10.0
He's destined to end up in Cooperstown, but Trout has been plagued by injuries in what should be the prime of his career. He hasn't played more than 140 games in a season since 2016, and a calf injury last year limited him to just 117 at-bats. If he can stay healthy, he'll hit a bunch of bombs and make major contributions in runs, RBI and batting average. Trout once stole 49 bases, but that was a long time ago, and the SBs might not come back now that he's in his 30s. You're bound to get an injury discount on Trout, and with good reason - the risk of continued health problems is very real. But if you're lucky enough to get 150+ games out of him, you're going to turn a big profit.
5 Kyle Tucker (HOU - RF) 11 2 15 4.9 2.2 14.0 +3.0
This former uber-prospect didn't disappoint in his first full MLB season, delivering the goods in five categories. There's room for more, as Tucker played 140 games and was typically slotted in the bottom half of the Astros' batting order. Tucker's contact rate is on the rise, he makes plenty of hard contact, and his flyball rate is what you're looking for in a power hitter. Tucker will probably never bee among the stolen base leaders, but he swiped 14 bags last year and has 20 SB upside. Tucker might just be scratching the surface of his talents. He figures to go somewhere close to the first-round/second-round turn, but he's destined to be a perennial first-rounder.
6 Ronald Acuna Jr. (ATL - DH,RF) 16 2 16 6.2 2.9 13.0 -3.0
In any other year, Acuna, Jr. is an easy top-five pick. The five-category star is a set-it-and-forget-it roster heavyweight. But coming off a gruesome mid-summer ACL tear, he's likely to miss most of April and possibly some of May, and Acuna is unlikely to wreak havoc on the basepaths for the first couple months. He's going to rake once he's healthy, but you might want to pass on Acuna unless you get a significant discount on him.
7 Luis Robert (CWS - CF) IL10 15 1 10 6.3 1.3 18.0 +3.0
The young White Sox slugger missed more than three months after straining his hip flexor trying to leg out an infield single but went nuclear upon his return, batting .350 with 12 HRs and 35 RBI over his final 43 games. Robert runs, too, with 15 SBs in 124 career games. There's legitimate 30-30 potential here, and it's not hard to imagine Robert producing a 40 HR season at cozy Guaranteed Rate Field. A ridiculous .394 BABIP fueled last year's .338 batting average, so there's bound to be some major recoil in that category. Health is a concern as well, as Robert experienced leg tightness in the playoffs. There's a lot to like here, but a second-round ADP seems a bit rich for a 24-year-old who has yet to play a full season.
8 Yordan Alvarez (HOU - LF,DH) 21 4 16 8.7 1.8 24.0 +3.0
Power is his calling card, and Alvarez didn't disappoint in that department last year, mashing 33 HRs with 104 RBI. He had a healthy .277 batting average in 2021 and has a career mark of .290, so the power doesn't come at the expense of BA. The power peripherals are outstanding - he's in the 97th percentile in average exit velocity, maximum exit velocity and hard hit percentage. There could be a 50 HR season lurking here. Alvarez has just one SB in 233 career games, and he's had surgery on both knees. But if those granddad knees hold up, you're likely to be please with your return on investment.
9 Aaron Judge (NYY - CF,RF,DH) 23 6 14 9.9 1.7 27.0 +4.0
All rise! His Honor enjoyed a season of reasonably good health in 2021 and posted a career-high .269 BA to go along with 39 HRs, 98 RBI and 89 runs. His 71% contact rate was the best of his career, and naturally his power peripherals were through the roof. No one punishes baseballs quite like Judge. Health is always a concern, and he doesn't run much, but the power skills should age well as this 6-7, 282-pound brute enters his 30s.
10 Starling Marte (NYM - CF,RF) IL10 24 6 24 10.2 2.2 26.0 +2.0
Speed kills. Or at least it does outside of the Big Apple. The Mets haven't had a player swipe 30 or more bases in the last seven seasons. Will they let their big free agent acquisition loose on the basepaths? Even if they do, at 34, will Marte still be an elite bag thief? If he's not running, Marte is a fantasy liability relative to his ADP. He's unlikely to pass the 20-dinger threshold, he's only had one season with 90 or more runs in his career, he's unlikely to equal last year's .372 BABIP, and he's part of the Mets' continually anemic offense. Don't overpay. But if he falls, snatch him up.
11 Teoscar Hernandez (TOR - DH,LF,RF) 27 6 17 11.1 1.8 31.0 +4.0
It would normally make sense to be wary of a late-ish bloomer who has a breakout year at age 28. Hernandez established new career highs in basically every offensive category last year, batting .296, belting 32 HRs, driving in 116 runs, scoring 92 times and doubling his previous season high in stolen bases with 12. But the peripheral numbers back it all up. Statcast absolutely loves Hernandez, even backing up the SB breakout by putting him in the 85th percentile for sprint speed. He'll bat cleanup in a stacked Blue Jays lineup and should get ample opportunities to drive in runs. A full repeat of his 2021 numbers might be a stretch, but Hernandez should be able to come close.
12 Cedric Mullins II (BAL - CF) 32 8 24 12.5 2.9 33.0 +1.0
The city of Baltimore hasn't seen such an unexpectedly high HR total since Brady Anderson smacked 50 homers in 1996. Mullins had hit seven HRs in 374 career at-bats entering 2021. He cleared the fence 30 times last year and added 30 stolen bases for good measure. Mullins played the 2020 season with an undiagnosed case of Crohn's disease, which may have prevented us from seeing the "real" Cedric Mullins. Some pullback on the HR total is probably inevitable, but the speed and other plate skills should remain intact. Looks slightly overpriced at a third-round ADP.
13 Whit Merrifield (TOR - 2B,CF,RF) 36 8 31 14.1 3.9 32.0 -4.0
This late bloomer has been fantasy gold for the last five years. Merrifield stole 40 bases last season at age 32. Durability is a big plus: Merrifield hasn't missed a game in the last three years. But there are some worrisome signs of slippage. His line drive rate has been steadily dropping over the last few seasons, and he hit only two home runs last season from July 1 on. Merrifield has been a terrific value for years, but it's possible he'll be slightly overpriced in 2022 drafts.
14 Nick Castellanos (PHI - DH,RF) 40 6 24 14.9 2.7 47.0 +7.0
"It's a deep drive to left field by Castellanos" has become baseball's best meme, which overshadows the fact that Castellanos has been one of baseball's most underrated power bats over the last half decade. The 29-year-old picked the perfect year to enter free agency, coming off a 2021 campaign with a .576 SLG% and a .938 OPS. The move to Philadelphia should be a good one, as it gives Castellanos a chance to bat cleanup directly behind Bryce Harper.
15 Byron Buxton (MIN - CF,DH) IL10 43 7 33 15.0 4.1 48.0 +5.0
Get a season of reasonably good health out of Buxton and you're likely to run a profit, probably a big one. But what are the chances he'll play 150 or more games? In the five non-COVID years that he's been on the Twins' Opening Day roster, Buxton has averaged 81.6 games played and 271.2 at-bats. In 2021, Buxton missed 39 games with a strained hip, then broke his hand after being hit with a pitch in his third game back, causing him to miss another month. When healthy, Buxton will steal a lot of bases and score plenty of runs. He's added power, too, and he batted .306 over 61 games last year. Still only 28, Buxton has upside galore, but the risk level here is enormous.
16 George Springer (TOR - CF,DH,RF) 47 10 29 16.3 3.3 53.0 +6.0
Quad and knee injuries limited Springer to 78 games in his first season with the Blue Jays, but he mashed when healthy, with 22 HRs, 50 RBI and 59 runs in just 299 at-bats. Springer has consistently posted batting averages in the .260s or higher during his career, and he'll steal a handful of bases for you. Batting leadoff with Bo Bichette, Vladimir Guerrero and Teoscar Hernandez behind him, Springer has a great chance to score 100 or more runs. He'll turn 33 in August, but he seems to be aging gracefully. Springer is a solid investment.
17 Tyler O'Neill (STL - CF,LF) IL10 52 9 32 17.6 3.5 58.0 +6.0
You could do a lot worse than O'Neil as your second outfielder. You're in great shape if somehow your third outfielder. He's a second-tier five-category guy, although O'Neill's .366 BABIP in 2021 suggests that he's probably not going to bat .286 again. The peripherals suggest that O'Neill's power is legit, however. He's not a guy you reach for, but if he starts to fall, grab him. O'Neill is only 26, so it's possible he'll turn in a season that ends up much better than his ADP.
18 Eloy Jimenez (CWS - DH,LF) 53 8 30 18.4 4.2 57.0 +4.0
Give the ascending slugger a mulligan for an ill-fated 2021 season. Jimenez ruptured a pectoral tendon in a spring training game and didn't come back until July 26. His surface stats in his 55 games were decent - 10 HRs, 37 RBI a .249 average - but Jimenez didn't live up to the promise he showed in the shortened 2020 season, when he had 14 HRs, 41 RBI and a .296 average. Expect a rebound and substantial power numbers. Speed isn't part of the package - he's played 232 career games and still hasn't stolen a base - but that's the only weakness here. It's only a matter of time before Jimenez gives us a 40 HR season.
19 Kris Bryant (COL - 1B,3B,CF,DH,LF,RF) MiLB 55 12 38 19.1 3.4 61.0 +6.0
He hasn't turned into the superstar we thought he was going to become, but he's still got power and will still knock in runs, and now he'll be doing his mashing at Coors Field. Bryant might not have been worth a top-100 selection if he landed in a bad spot, but going to the Rockies gives him a significant value boost.
20 Randy Arozarena (TB - DH,LF,RF) 56 12 30 19.6 3.2 66.0 +10.0
The playoff hero of 2020 provided a satisfying encore by being named 2021 AL Rookie of the Year, though there was some slippage. After belting 10 HRs in 20 playoff games two seasons ago, Arozarena hit 20 homers in 141 games last season and struck out 170 times. A modest flyball rate and ordinary Statcast numbers suggest that Arozarena probably won't provide elite power numbers. Last year's 37% hit rate fueled a .274 batting average that may not be sustainable. On the bright side, he had 20 SBs on 30 attempts. There are a multiple paths to value here, but still, Arozarena is a high-profile player likely to be overdrafted.
21 J.D. Martinez (BOS - LF,RF,DH) 59 13 26 21.1 2.3 79.0 +20.0
Martinez got the bad taste of 2020 out of his mouth with a fine 2021 season. After batting .213 and hitting only seven HRs in the COVID-shortened 2020 campaign, Martinez batted .286 last year with 28 HRs, 99 RBI and 92 runs. Martinez is 34, so there's some age-related risk, but his 2021 Statcast numbers and other peripheral stats suggest that his skill set is aging well. He plays in a great hitter's park, and batting behind Rafael Devers and Xander Bogaerts should provide plenty of RBI opportunities. FantasyPros rankers like Martinez much more than the general public does - an indication that he's probably a value.
22 Ketel Marte (ARI - 2B,CF,DH) IL10 64 15 31 21.7 2.7 74.0 +10.0
Guys with recurring muscle injuries scare me. They're one wrong step away from missing a month. Marte terrifies me. Ever since his 2019 breakout that had all of us wondering if we'd be better off with Marte or Ozzie Albies (lol, what were we thinking?), Marte has had trouble staying healthy. Arizona is likely to give him more rest this season with the goal of keeping him on the field. He'll still help you in average, and he has a little pop in his bat, but he's one of the riskier investments in fantasy baseball.
23 Giancarlo Stanton (NYY - LF,RF,DH) 71 11 33 23.8 2.8 94.0 +23.0
If he stays relatively healthy, Stanton is probably going to contend for the home run crown. But that's a huge "if," obviously. Stanton enjoyed two relatively healthy seasons in 2018-2019, played 41 combined games in 2019-2020, and managed to play 139 games last year with only one stay on the DL for a quad issue. Statcast numbers show that he's still one of the games top sluggers, and he should have better luck in RBIs and runs than he had last season, when he had 97 and 64, respectively. Stanton doesn't run, but he holds his own in batting average. There's a lot of risk here, particularly with Stanton now well into his 30s, but the lengthy injury history almost guarantees a discount in drafts.
24 Bryan Reynolds (PIT - CF,DH,LF) 73 13 42 24.0 3.5 84.0 +11.0
What is zero? The odds that Reynolds stays on the Pittsburgh roster all season. Thanks for playing FantasyPros Jeopardy. I like Reynolds. You should like Reynolds. He has a chance to be a sneaky difference maker, a guy who'll get dealt in July and make a huge difference on a playoff team. In the first half of the season, he'll give you solid numbers in a lineup void of talent. Once he ends up in the No 3 or No. 5 spot in a lineup surrounded by stars, he'll put up top-50 numbers.
25 Christian Yelich (MIL - DH,LF) 81 18 35 25.7 3.5 93.0 +12.0
The way you regard Yelich depends on what type of fantasy manager you are. Do you like rolling the dice on potential superstars who can't stay upright? Or would you rather take a lesser player and know you'll get 150 games out of him? If you're in the latter category, Yelich is probably on your do-not-draft list. His upside is huge, but the now-30-year-old outfielder dealt with serious back issues last season, and back injuries have a tendency to reoccur.
26 Brandon Lowe (TB - 2B,DH,LF,RF) IL60 68 15 40 23.8 5.6 70.0 +2.0
In 2021, Lowe became a full-time player for the first time in his career and responded with 39 HRs, 99 RBI and 97 runs. He batted only .247 last year and struck out 167 times in 615 plate appearances. Lowe has also struggled against lefties throughout his career. But Lowe's first-half/second-half splits were eye-opening. He was batting .208 at the All-Star break; Lowe batted .292 after the break and dramatically reduced his strikeout rate without sacrificing any power. If the second-half adjustments stick, Lowe might actually be able to improve upon his breakout season.
27 Mitch Haniger (SEA - RF,DH) 93 24 49 29.9 3.2 100.0 +7.0
Sports hernia surgery caused him to miss the 2020 season, but Haniger returned in a big way last year, posting career highs in home runs (39), RBI (100) and runs (110). There are some warning signs here, however. Haniger's strikeout rate has gone through the roof, and his on-base percentage has plummeted. His exit velocities suggest that he won't match last year's HR total. The good news is that Haniger's banner 2021 season hasn't driven his price sky-high. Still, some caution is warranted.
28 Kyle Schwarber (PHI - 1B,DH,LF) 95 19 48 30.0 5.2 102.0 +7.0
Schwarber was really, really good in 2020. He ranked in the top 10% of the league in barrel rate, average and maximum exit velocity, hard-hit rate, walk percentage, and wOBA. He also batted a career-best .266, probably because he swung at far fewer pitches outside the strike zone than he ever had before. He'll now bat near or at the top of a strong Phillies lineup in a park that should only accentuate Schwarber's raw power. If Schwarber can hold the gains he saw last year - being more selective, hitting more line drives, etc. - then he should be in for perhaps his best season to date.
29 Franmil Reyes (CHC - RF,DH) 88 16 42 28.7 5.3 111.0 +23.0
Reyes crushes the ball and has the potential to become one of MLB's elite power hitters. The problem is that he hits the ball on the ground way too often. He had a 46% groundball rate in 2021 and a 36% flyball rate. That's a low flyball rate for a power hitter, and yet it's the highest of Reyes's four-year career. His 64% contact rate last year suggests there's worrisome BA downside here. Reyes doesn't steal bases. His run totals have been unimpressive and don't figure to improve with the bottom of the Cleveland batting order looking so anemic. And Reyes is only DH-eligible in most leagues. Reyes could lead the AL in homers if he makes launch-angle adjustments, but let someone else chase that dream.
30 Jesse Winker (SEA - DH,LF) 101 25 56 32.6 6.2 105.0 +4.0
Winker's value drops with the move to Seattle, which has one of the most pitcher-friendly parks in MLB. He should still provide a solid batting average, but aspirations of 30 HR and 90 RBI now seem far-fetched. Winker is yet another player who deals with chronic injuries. He's a guy I usually pass on and regret it at least 21 nights of the season, but pat myself on the back the rest of the year.
31 Fernando Tatis Jr. (SD - SS,CF,RF) SUS 99 17 67 32.8 6.0 49.0 -50.0
A fractured wrist has changed the draft calculus on Tatis Jr., who might be out for as long as three months. It's always taken an iron stomach to draft him and deal with the injury risk. When healthy, he's a multi-category box score stuffer. His counting numbers are so orbital, he's basically a seven-category player ... when he's on the field. Now, you simply can't consider taking him within the first seven rounds.
32 Ryan Mountcastle (BAL - 1B,LF,DH) 111 23 58 36.5 6.3 115.0 +4.0
Mountcastle fully arrived in his age-24 season, shaking off a slow start to finish with 33 HR, 89 RBI, 77 runs and a reasonable .255 batting average. His .333 BA in the abbreviated 2020 season was a mirage, but Mountcastle's power is legit, with a .232 ISO in 2021 and home runs on 20% of his flyballs. There's a lot of swing-and-miss to Mountcastle's game, which could make him a BA risk, and he won't steal many bases. But the power profile is enticing, and it's a nice bonus that Mountcastle has dual eligibility as an outfielder and first baseman.
33 Cody Bellinger (LAD - CF) 110 22 67 36.7 8.7 103.0 -7.0
The last thing you want to do is pass on a former MVP who can be had in the middle rounds because his draft stock is plummeting. The second-to-last-thing you want to do is grab a player hoping for a bounce-back season and bang your head on a desk every night as he continues his affair with the Mendoza line. What if last year's crater season was an aberration? Worse, what if it wasn't? Bellinger is still only 26, but he won't have 1B eligibility in most formats, leaving him eligible for OF only. Oh, heck, if he's still there in the ninth or 10th round, take a chance. And find a bottle of Advil.
34 Tommy Edman (STL - 2B,RF,SS) 114 24 73 38.7 10.6 113.0 -1.0
There's a lot to like here. The biggest draws are speed and multi-position (OF/2B) eligibility. Edman stole 30 bases last year, tying for fourth in MLB. Statcast says he's in the 92nd percentile for sprint speed. There's a little bit of power here, too. Edman hit only 11 HRs last year but clubbed 41 doubles. Edman has a .272 batting average over three seasons, and there could be room for growth there. His contact rate improved to 85% last year, and he sprays hits to both sides of the diamond. Edman doesn't take many walks, but that's a minor nit to pick.
35 Austin Meadows (DET - DH,LF,RF) IL60 124 29 57 40.3 6.9 135.0 +11.0
On the one hand, Meadows largely bounced back from the horror story that was the abbreviated 2020 season. His strikeout rate normalized, his power returned, and his playing time stabilized. The glaring exception was that he could not correct his sudden struggles against lefties. In 2019, Meadows slashed .275/.316/.521 against southpaws. Last year, he slashed just .198/.270/.293 against them. Even if Meadows's overall numbers are passable, it seems unlikely that a team like the Rays are going to let a player who is merely an average defender continue to keep an everyday job when he's virtually useless against left-handed throwers. That would still leave Meadows on the strong side of a platoon, but if he does begin to sit more regularly, his counting stats will take a hit, and fantasy managers should be aware of that before they select him in their drafts.
36 Jared Walsh (LAA - 1B,RF) IL60 105 22 54 33.9 6.4 109.0 +4.0
Walsh was outstanding in his rookie year, blasting 29 home runs and batting .277. His expected batting average (.257) and slugging percentage (.436) lagged significantly behind his actual numbers, but his 114.8 MPH maximum exit velocity was in the top six percent of MLB and suggests his power is real. Walsh couldn't hit a lick against lefties last year, as he batted just .170 against them with a .565 OPS. But, even if he loses time against them, his success against righties should be more than enough to keep him relevant. Buy him as a 30-homer bat but take at least 10 to 20 points off his batting average from last year.
37 Trent Grisham (SD - CF) 128 30 55 40.8 6.2 147.0 +19.0
Grisham was . . . fine last year. His 15 homers and 13 steals contributed, particularly given that he missed time with injury. But there just wasn't much to get excited about. There's probably more to be had in the stolen base department, as Grisham ranks in the 91st percentile in sprint speed. And he should bat atop the lineup this year with Fernando Tatis set to miss time. But your best-case scenario is a 20-15 line with a batting average that hurts. That's a startable player in fantasy, but not one you should reach for in drafts.
38 Lourdes Gurriel Jr. (TOR - 1B,DH,LF) IL10 133 24 74 43.1 9.1 133.0
Gurriel cut his strikeout rate to a career-best 18.9%, but that's pretty much where the good news ends. His quality of contact dropped significantly (at least in some part due to a knee injury he played through), resulting in a sharp downturn in both his home runs and slugging percentage. Playing for a ridiculously strong Toronto offense will keep his counting stats relatively afloat, and he may bat higher in the order with Marcus Semien in Texas now. And he's entering his age-28 season so perhaps there's a power bump coming. But Gurriel looks much more like a player who you draft because he won't hurt you, not because he'll help you a ton.
39 Josh Bell (SD - 1B,DH,LF) 109 27 53 36.5 5.7 128.0 +19.0
Bell had a horrid .464 OPS in April, likely because his timing was off after missing time because of a COVID-19 diagnosis. But once he found his footing, he was everything that Nationals hoped he would be. He batted .277 with an .887 OPS in the second half, and even played plenty of outfield so Washington could keep his bat in the lineup even with Ryan Zimmerman playing well. His walk percentage and strikeout rate largely returned to their pre-2020 levels, and he got better and better as the season went along. With Zimmerman now retired and the DH in the National League, Bell's bat should remain in the lineup nearly every day, and the presence of Juan Soto and Nelson Cruz should offer him plenty of RBI opportunities. He's not a fantasy superstar, but he's a capable starter at first base for your fantasy team.
40 Joey Gallo (LAD - DH,LF,RF) 131 28 75 43.1 8.0 151.0 +20.0
It should tell you all you need to know about Gallo that he hit 38 home runs and scored 90 runs last season and baseball fans and fantasy players view his year as a disaster. Gallo basically did what he always did - he struck out a ton (34.6%), walked more than anyone not named Juan Soto (18%) and left the yard often. His sub-.200 batting average is just basically what Gallo is going to bring to the table unless he changes his approach or gets lucky, though the fact that he hit ground balls at an elevated clip didn't help much. He'll still be batting in the middle of a strong Yankees lineup, so if you can deal with the batting average hit, draft him for the homers and runs scored production.
41 Avisail Garcia (MIA - DH,RF) 134 33 63 44.2 6.0 177.0 +43.0
Garcia had an outstanding year with Milwaukee, hitting 29 home runs and driving in 86 in just 135 games. As usual, he showed elite maximum exit velocity, continuing his run of ranking in the top seven percent of MLB in that category since it began being tracked. He signed a four-year deal with Miami and, given the park dimensions and lack of lineup protection, that's obviously not the best place for him to end up. But the bottom line is that a 25-10 season is very much in reach, and he's a fine later-round selection who can fill in as a fourth outfielder.
42 Hunter Renfroe (MIL - CF,RF) 136 31 61 44.3 5.4 149.0 +13.0
Renfroe has always had power but put it all together last year for Boston and became one of their most reliable and dependable bats.He cut his strikeout rate to just 22.7% and although he was still much better against lefties, he made major gains against righties such that he went far beyond potentially being placed in a platoon situation. Moving to the Brewers can only help his power, so bank on 30 home runs with helpful counting stats everywhere but steals.
43 Chris Taylor (LAD - 2B,3B,CF,DH,LF,RF,SS) DTD 137 34 80 44.7 7.9 131.0 -6.0
Taylor had an excellent season, hitting 20 homers and stealing 13 bases while playing all over the diamond as usual. The Dodgers rewarded him with a four-year, $60 million deal, which pretty much guarantees that he'll find his way into the lineup nearly every day. He won't wow you in any category but given his position flexibility and placement in the best lineup in baseball, Taylor is an ideal player for any fantasy team who should offer similar numbers to last year.
44 Alex Verdugo (BOS - LF,CF,RF) 143 36 69 47.2 5.7 166.0 +23.0
Verdugo is a reliable option for batting average, as he's batted at least .289 in three straight seasons. He doesn't have a ton of pop or speed, though he'll at least chip in with home runs and steals, and because he'll bat near the top of the Red Sox lineup, should be an asset in runs scored. Think of a poor man's version of Michael Brantley in his prime and that's what Verdugo will give you, and that's plenty valuable for fantasy.
45 Dylan Carlson (STL - LF,CF,RF) 144 31 61 47.5 7.7 160.0 +16.0
Carlson rebounded from a disastrous 2020 season to put up a respectable .266/.343/.437 line with 18 home runs last year. But the dreams of fantasy superstardom after his 2019 minor-league season (26 homers, 20 steals) have been put on hold, as he seems to have little interest in stealing bases in the majors (three total in two seasons), and his hard-hit rate was in the bottom nine percent of the league last year. His numbers and underlying metrics suggest that he's a slightly above-average MLB player, though it's worth remembering that he's just 23 years old and there's certainly potential for more. Drafting Carlson as a fourth outfielder with upside for more is the right approach, as he should bring a fairly solid floor with potential for a high ceiling if everything comes together.
46 Jarred Kelenic (SEA - CF,LF,RF) 146 27 82 48.0 11.0 152.0 +6.0
Kelenic's season was shaping up to be an all-time disaster for a prospect, but a fairly strong final month, during which he hit seven homers and slashed .248/.331/.524, salvaged things a bit. He still batted just .180 on the year and struck out 28.1% of the time, but there's reason to believe he can put his year in the rear view mirror and start fresh. Kelenic has an advanced approach, and could pretty easily put up a 20-20 season without batting an eye if everything breaks right. With a stronger Mariners lineup batting behind him, Kelenic should be someone to target in fantasy drafts given his potential and strong close to the 2021 season.
47 Marcell Ozuna (ATL - DH,LF) 164 21 114 48.7 17.1 159.0 -5.0
Ozuna missed the majority of the season after he was arrested on charges of aggravated assault by strangulation and battery last year. He's 31 years old now and his hard hit rate and average exit velocity declined sharply last year, along with his home run percentage and batting average. It's not clear if his numbers last year were just a blip or the start of a steep decline, but you shouldn't be relying on him as a starter for now.
48 Jorge Soler (MIA - DH,LF,RF) IL60 150 32 71 49.5 6.6 170.0 +20.0
Soler's 48-homer season isn't ever going to repeat itself, but he doesn't need it to in order to provide fantasy value. He popped 27 homers last year and although his batting average has been in the .220s each of the last two years, his expected batting average has been closer to the high .240s. Now with the Marlins, he'll need every bit of hard contact he can get, but he should benefit from the NL adopting the DH. Soler isn't and won't be a star, but he's a useful fourth outfielder in mixed leagues.
49 Seiya Suzuki (CHC - LF,RF) 157 13 72 47.3 11.9 134.0 -23.0
Suzuki signed with the Cubs this offseason, and will come over from the Hiroshima Toyo Carp after dominating last year in Japan. He hit 38 home runs and had a 1.073 OPS, and he has a career .315 batting average and .985 OPS in the NPS. Projecting players coming over from Japan is fraught with difficulties, but the general consensus is that Suzuki has 30-homer power with the ability to hit for average and steal double-digit bases. Whether that manifests itself in his first year remains to be seen, but there are few players with similar upside going at his ADP. Draft him as a fourth outfielder, but hope he plays like a second or third option.
50 Eddie Rosario (ATL - LF,RF) 160 33 72 51.2 6.6 165.0 +5.0
Rosario re-signed with the Braves after coming over mid-season last year from Clevelan. He's still a productive MLB player but it's unclear if he can recapture the form that made him one of the more underrated assets in fantasy. He's no longer out-performing his expected batting average and he's never hit the ball particularly hard, so the 32 home runs we saw back in 2019 are probably never coming back. But he'll likely approach a 20-10 season in Atlanta and stick in the lineup every day with the addition of the DH in the National League. You could do worse as your last outfielder in a mixed league.
51 Daulton Varsho (ARI - C,CF,DH,LF,RF) 155 26 81 51.6 13.5 108.0 -47.0
Varsho has bounced around from catcher to the outfield so far in his major league career, but he is penned in as the everyday center fielder in 2022. His bat is solid, not necessarily elite, and if he was only outfield eligible, he'd probably be a fifth outfielder or high-end bench piece. But his projected 15-10 line plays incredibly well at catcher, where he retains eligibility, and he'll likely bat in the middle of the lineup which should help buoy his counting stats, even in Arizona's lineup. He's a rock solid starting catcher for fantasy purposes, but don't play to play him in the outfield.
52 Adolis Garcia (TEX - CF,DH,LF,RF) 163 36 79 53.9 7.6 168.0 +5.0
Garcia came out of absolutely nowhere last season to become one of just five players to hit at least 31 home runs and steal at least 16 bases. His success largely came early in the season, as he blasted 11 home runs in May with a .312 batting average before, as most fantasy managers expected, pitchers adjusted. The adjustment hit Garcia hard, as he slashed just .211/.256/.370 in the second half, though he stole seven bases over the final month of the season to cushion the blow. The issue for Garcia is the same that plagues most largely unknown hitters who put up huge hot streaks - he lacks plate discipline. His strikeout rate (31.2%) and walk rate (5.1%) were both in the bottom six percent of MLB, and both were due largely to the fact that he simply swings too much at pitches outside of the zone (39.7 O-Swing%, ninth-worst in the league). The Rangers have a much-improved lineup and perhaps Garcia will improve in his second year, but unless he drastically changes his approach, his numbers are going to have a hard cap on them.
53 Andrew Benintendi (NYY - LF) IL10 165 29 82 54.9 9.3 193.0 +28.0
Benintendi was the classic "needs a change of scenery" player and got relatively back on track with the Royals. He looked almost identical to the disappointing but absolutely usable version of himself that he showed in 2019, and his underlying rates were nearly identical. He did walk at a career-worst rate but he also got his strikeout rate down under control, and had he avoided injury, he surely would have put up a 20-10 season. There's every reason to expct him to be able to do that again, but expect his other counting stats to remain mediocre with Kansas City's lineup.
54 Alex Kirilloff (MIN - 1B,LF,RF) IL60 169 37 83 55.7 7.1 192.0 +23.0
Kirilloff had a poor 2021 season, ultimately succumbing to wrist surgery to fix an injury that has reportedly bothered him off and on for a few years at this point. Long-term, there's plenty of reason for optimism given his pedigree and strong minor league numbers. But for this year, he's more of a middling outfield filler. His quality of contact and home park aren't favorable enough to lead to a major outburst in power, and his surrounding lineup isn't strong enough to offer a favorable environment for counting stats. Kirilloff probably won't hurt you in batting average and he'll hit about 20 home runs, but players like that are a dime a dozen in redraft leagues. Take him late as a filler, but still view him as a target in keeper and dynasty formats.
55 Akil Baddoo (DET - LF,CF) 170 41 87 56.0 9.1 186.0 +16.0
Baddoo wasn't expected to contribute much in the majors last year, but he came on strong and ultimately played in 124 games, hitting 13 home runs and stealing 18 bases while batting .259. The speed is legtimate, as he ranked in the 91st percentile in sprint speed last season, but he's going to significantly improve on his .523 OPS against lefties if he's going to find success this year. Baddoo should begin the year batting leadoff in front of an improved Tigers lineup, so if he can just maintain his performance against righties and improve against lefties somewhat, a 20-20 season coul be in the cards. If not, then he'll likely bat in the lower third of the order and lose much of his value.
56 Robbie Grossman (ATL - LF,RF) 168 35 89 56.9 10.9 188.0 +20.0
Grossman came out of nowhere to put up a 20-20 line in his age-31 season. And by "out of nowhere," I mean that his previous season-high in homers was 11 and his previous high in steals was nine. Everything suggests that Grossman sold out a bit for power, as he greatly increased both his launch angle and fly ball rate (46.2%). If he does that again, he can probably approach 20 homers for a second straight season, but considering his mediocre sprint speed (68th percentile), it would be surprising if he reached 20 steals. Take about 5-7 off your projections for both numbers and you probably won't be disappointed.
57 Julio Rodriguez (SEA - CF,RF) IL10 220 18 144 57.7 28.7 318.0 +98.0
 
58 Ian Happ (CHC - CF,DH,LF,RF) 176 43 81 59.5 6.4 241.0 +65.0
There was a lot of good with Happ's 2021 season. He reached a career-high in home runs, runs scored, and stolen bases, and he kept his walk rate in the double digits. But he also batted a career worst .226 and ranked in the bottom nine percent of the league with a 29.2% strikeout rate. Happ should be a starter for the Cubs, of course, but with the addition of Seiya Suzuki and with Clint Frazier on board, Chicago may be a little less patient with his slumps. Make sure you're taken care of in batting average and have depth if you draft Happ, because with his production come some pretty glaring risks.
59 Adam Duvall (ATL - LF,CF,RF) IL60 178 42 84 59.8 7.6 222.0 +44.0
Duvall had the quietest 38-homer season in recent memory, which happens when a bulk of it takes place in Miami. He also led the National League in RBI and was one of the leaders in max exit velocity. But he also batted just .228 and struck out 31.4% of the time. Duvall is now 33 years old so expecting a rebound in batting average or strikeout rate is probably wishful thinking. But if it's power you crave, then Duvall should have you covered, particularly with playing his home game in Atlanta's hitter-friendly Truist Park.
60 Austin Hays (BAL - CF,LF,RF) 183 42 78 61.2 7.8 240.0 +57.0
Hays finally made good on his prospect pedigree, hitting 22 home runs and topping 140 combined runs and RBI. It wasn't perfect - he walked only 5.3% of the time and his hard-hit rate and exit velocity were mediocre. But he had a strong close to th season with 12 home runs and 35 RBI over the final two months of the season. Just 26 years old, there's plenty of room for growth, though the new dimensions in Camden Yards may keep his power in check a bit. Buy him at his 2021 numbers and understand there's plenty of room for growth.
61 Jo Adell (LAA - LF,RF) 186 35 90 61.3 10.8 212.0 +26.0
Adell has massive power but hit just four home runs in 35 games in the majors last year. But his strikeout rate was a very manageable 22.9% after it was an incredibly bloated 41.7% in 2020, and that generally bodes well for a prospect. He worked on a swing change this offseason and looks much, much more comfortable in the spring. As fantasy managers know, prospect growth is not linear, so Adell's mediocre performance in the majors to this point shouldn't give you much pause. You'll have to pay more for him than his numbers suggest you should, be he's got the type of upside that should make the price worth it.
62 Tommy Pham (BOS - CF,DH,LF) 190 30 91 61.6 11.2 244.0 +54.0
Pham recently signed with the Reds, and even though the team has shipped off most of its lineup, it's not a bad fit. Pham's batting average has suffered over the last two seasons, but his expected batting average (.266, .258) suggests that he's been more unlucky than anything. And although his power numbers have declined, a move to Great American Ball Park should likely add a few home runs to his ledger this year. Pham still walks a ton and is a lock for double-digit steals, and he's the type of player who fantasy managers like to ignore each year. Don't worry as much about the lack of lineup protection, and instead buy the high floor and relative lack of competition for his job.
63 Myles Straw (CLE - CF) 197 29 101 55.9 13.5 174.0 -23.0
Straw is your quintessential no-power, all-speed player. He hit four home runs last year and that's not going to be anomaly given his incredibly low hard-hit rate. But he stole 30 bases and ranked in the 96th percentile in sprint speed. He'll lead off for the Guardians this season and given their likely futility on offense, it's reasonable to expect Straw to try to swipe a bag at every chance he gets. If you're covered in power, he's a fine pick, but don't have any dreams of a home run surge now or anytime in the future.
64 Charlie Blackmon (COL - DH,RF) IL10 187 38 85 61.8 6.3 217.0 +30.0
Blackmon is in obvious decline as he enters his age-35 season. At one point, he was a lock for at least 29 home runs, well over 100 runs, and double-digit steals with a .300 batting average. Now, you're hoping for .280-15-80, with any steals he throws in as gravy. There's no huge analysis that needs to be done here - Father Time is undefeated, and the old Blackmon isn't coming back. The depth of the Rockies lineup continues to take a hit, even with the addition of Kris Bryant, and at this point, you're drafting Blackmon hoping for one more mediocre season out of him. There are better places to invest your draft capital.
65 Michael Brantley (HOU - LF,RF,DH) IL60 185 36 104 62.1 11.3 216.0 +31.0
Brantley is one of the most consistent players in all of fantasy baseball, and so long as you're looking for what he gives you, there's nothing wrong with that. He's a lock to bat .300 and he'll generally offer decent runs and RBI totals batting in a strong Houston lineup. But the power that we saw in 2019 was an aberration at this point, and unless MLB uses juiced balls again, Brantley is likely to end up in the 10-12 home run range. At an advancing age, there's always reason to be concerned that he'll fall off a cliff, but nothing in his profile suggests that is imminent. Draft him for batting average but make sure you can make up the speed and power elsewhere.
66 AJ Pollock (CWS - CF,LF,RF) 191 44 82 62.8 7.7 225.0 +34.0
Pollock reminded everyone last year why he was once such a desirable fantasy commodity. In just 117 games, he popped 21 home runs and added nine steals, all while batting .297. Pollock's issue has never been about his talent, and his career might be viewed differently if he could have stayed healthy. But his 117 games played last year represented his most since 2015, and given that he's already dealing with general soreness in the spring, it's highly unlikely that he'll surpass that number in his age-34 season. His skills have not declined much, and his 19% strikeout rate last year represented his best since 2017. So long as you factor in plenty of missed time, Pollock should again offer you fairly elite production on a game-by-game basis.
67 Ramon Laureano (OAK - CF,RF) IL10 202 45 92 66.7 9.6 276.0 +74.0
Laureano has 28 games remaining on his suspension for PEDs, and given the dearth of talent on the A's, most fantasy managers are likely not going to target him during their drafts. But he's one of just a handful of players who are capable of putting up a 25-15 line over the course of a full season, and his eight steals over the first month last year showed how he could likely steal 25 if he really wanted to. There's not a ton to love otherwise about his offensive game, and his batting average probably won't help very much. But if you can deal with his absence for the first month of the season, he'll offer a decent power-speed combo, albeit one without many other helpful stats.
68 Randal Grichuk (COL - CF,DH,RF) 210 37 107 67.7 15.6 227.0 +17.0
It's not often that an offensive player can be traded out of Toronto and get an upgrade in his value, but that's exactly what Grichuk got with his move to Colorado. We know what Grichuk is by now - he's gonna make elite contact with the ball a ton, but he's not at all selective, so he holds himself back by swinging at bad pitches. There's a ton of power with the veteran, and Coors Field should help boost his batting average from his career .245 mark. He's slated to bat sixth right now, meaning there should be RBI opportunity aplenty, so he makes a fine fifth outfielder for your fantasy team, with the upside to be more.
69 Amed Rosario (CLE - CF,LF,SS) 200 38 104 63.9 13.1 229.0 +29.0
It was a tale of two halves for Rosario, as he slashed .259/.306/.367 in the first half and .309/.339/.457 in the second half. The end result was a good one, as Rosario wound up being a contributor in four of the five rotisserie categories, and is trending up heading into 2022. The biggest issue at this point is the extreme weakness of the Guardians' lineup, which is projected to be one of the worst in baseball. That's going to significantly cut into Rosario's counting stats and depress his value. But the options to help your batting average and generally contribute everywhere are few and far between, so Rosario should be no worse than a high-end bench player for your team.
70 Kike Hernandez (BOS - 2B,CF,SS) 217 44 124 69.5 7.7 210.0 -7.0
Hernandez had an extremely solid year batting atop the Red Sox lineup, hitting 20 home runs and tallying 84 runs scored. Very little about his underlying batted ball data and overall metrics were different - he just stayed healthy and became an everyday player. His batting average won't help you and he offers nothing in the stolen base category. But he should be a major asset in runs scored and contribute in homers and RBI. With the addition of Trevor Story, he'll likely be the everyday center fielder, but he'll retain his second base eligibility from last year, further strengthening his value. Hernandez won't win you your league, but he's the type of player you can leave in your lineup all year long.
71 Mark Canha (NYM - LF,CF,RF) 212 52 83 70.5 6.1 254.0 +42.0
Canha had an interesting 2021 season, as he saw his average continue to trend down but randomly stole 12 bases with Oakland. Now with the Mets, he'll likely bat toward the bottom of the order, so chances are he won't come close to the 93 runs he scored last year. If you're in an OBP league, Canha's value increases greatly, as his walk rate hasn't been lower than 12.3% in any of the last three seasons. But in a standard 5x5 league, he's mostly just a filler option.
72 Harrison Bader (NYY - CF) 215 54 84 70.6 5.7 267.0 +52.0
Bader has always been known as a defensive outfielder, but his offensive game picked up last year. He cut his strikeout rate six points from his career mark and set a career best in home runs (16) and RBI (50), Bader has never had more than 427 plate appearances in a season, but he could easily steal 20 bases if stays healthy, as he ranks in the 97th percentile in sprint speed. Consider him akin to Tommy Pham around his prime in a best-case scenario, and given his ADP, he's a solid investment.
73 Michael Conforto (RF) FA 213 38 135 67.7 19.6 198.0 -15.0
It appears as of now that Conforto guessed wrong when he turned down a long-term offer from the Mets and the qualifying offer, as he finds himself in an awkward limbo without a team well into the spring. There's obvious potential with Conforto, who hit at least 27 home runs for three straight seasons, gets on base at an above-average clip, and is just entering his age-29 season. But as we saw with Kris Bryant, it's hard to properly assess a player's fantasy value until we know his landing spot and, in Conforto's case, when he's going to sign.In a vacuum, however, Conforto can be a third or fourth outfielder for your fantasy team, someone who is capable of contributing in all five categories, though likely not excelling at any. Until he signs, you should drop him a good 10 spots from where you would otherwise have him, but he's not going to sit out the entire season, so don't let him fall too far in drafts.
74 Max Kepler (MIN - CF,RF) IL10 227 50 95 73.4 8.7 291.0 +64.0
Kepler's expected stats suggest he got pretty unlucky last year, as they looked a lot like his 2019 season where he hit 38 home runs and batted .252. On the plus side, he did swipe 10 bases, the first time he had reached double digits in that category in his career. His true outcome likely lies somewhere between his 2019 season and last year's numbers, and he's more of a .240, 20-homer bat. The bigger problem this year is that the Twins' lineup likely won't be strong, and his counting stats will take a hit. Kepler can fill in for you, just don't rely on him as a starter.
75 Anthony Santander (BAL - DH,LF,RF) 231 53 97 73.9 7.3 294.0 +63.0
Santander dealt with a litany of injuries last year to his lower body, so the fact that he still popped 18 home runs in 100 games is rather impressive. He's admitted he is not 100% healthy after last year, which is obviously concerning with the season on the verge of beginning. Nevertheless, given Santander's ADP, he's well worth drafting. He's got 25 home runs in his bat easily if he can remain healthy, and his defense is so strong that he'll remain in the lineup even if he struggles offensively to start as he finds his footing. He rarely walks and so his runs scored total will never help you, but he's fine as a cheap outfield bat that always gets overlooked in fantasy.
76 Mike Yastrzemski (SF - CF,RF) 240 60 90 75.9 5.4 269.0 +29.0
Yastrzemski couldn't replicate his 2020 pace, though he did hit 25 home runs and total 155 combined runs and RBI. His batting average plummeted to just .224 (and his .222 xBA, one of the worst in the league, showed that number was earned), as pitchers continued their trends of throwing him fewer and fewer fastballs and more off-speed offerings.He performed terribly against non-fastballs last year, which led to a ridiculously low .254 BABIP, which was way out of character for him. Yastrzemski needs to adjust, but the good news is that the power he's shown appears to be real, and his counting stats should stay afloat batting in a strong San Francisco lineup. But until or unless he can improve against off-speed pitches, he'll likely struggle with batting average.
77 Wil Myers (SD - 1B,LF,RF) 238 55 100 76.9 6.9 307.0 +69.0
Myers couldn't sustain the many gains he made in the shortened 2020 season, but he didn't fall off a cliff entirely. His .256 batting average was his best (other than 2020) since 2016, and he offered 25 combined home runs and steals. The thing is that Myers' strikeout rate rose to 28.2%, but that's a number he can live with if he continued to make the quality of contact we're used to seeing from him. But, he didn't. His hard hit rate and exit velocity fell off a cliff (his 29.8% hard contact rate was one of the worst in baseball). It would seem like an odd decline for Myers, who was just 30 last year, so it may have just been a blip. But, it's worth being cautious before you head into the season assuming he'll bounce back. Given his ADP, however, you won't need to have confidence in him for him to be worth drafting.
78 Jesus Sanchez (MIA - CF,LF,RF) 249 48 108 77.1 11.0 368.0 +119.0
Sanchez hits the ball hard and does so consistently, so he has a ton of power upside. He won't maintain the almost 40-homer pace he was on last year, and he needs to improve on his 31.1% strikeout rate if he's going to take a jump in value. But think Adolis Garcia without the speed - someone who will at times look unstoppable and go on major runs, but other times will frustrate you with his lack of consistency. He has the upside for 30-homer, 90-RBI season, so as a late-round pick, he's a great option.
79 Andrew Vaughn (CWS - 1B,DH,LF,RF) 245 50 108 79.0 12.1 284.0 +39.0
Vaughn's rookie season was a little unfair, as he was thrust into the outfield despite little experience there when Eloy Jimenez suffered a serious injury in the spring. His 15 home runs in 127 games as a rookie showed his potential, but his 21.5% strikeout rate was a bit higher than projected. He'll likely see at-bats from several positions this year, as he plays outfield, first base, and DH, and it's likely that an advanced college bat such as his will take a step forward this year. Expect a good 20% increase on all his numbers across the board, which should make him startable, but not quite a fantasy superstar.
80 Andrew McCutchen (MIL - DH,LF,RF) 248 53 97 79.1 7.8 295.0 +47.0
McCutchen batted just .222 last year with the worst strikeout rate of his career (23%), but he provided plenty of value elsewhere. His walk rate was a robust 14.1%, he slugged 27 home runs, and fell just short of 160 combined runs and RBI. He'll move to Milwaukee this year, and so his power should translate once again, and he'll likely get to extra at-bats as the DH. He's not exciting, but even the batting average should bounce back a bit given his expected stats last year, so don't be afraid to pull the trigger late.
81 Brandon Nimmo (NYM - LF,CF) 254 53 122 82.3 9.1 309.0 +55.0
It's hard not to love a guy who sprints to first base after a walk, especially when he walks 14% of the time, one of the best rates in baseball. Nimmo will lead off again this year for the Mets, and given his elite OBP (.393 career), he should score plenty of runs. He doesn't have a ton of power or speed, but a fully healthy Nimmo should give you close to a 15-10 season with a plus batting average and contribution in the runs scored categories. The key phrase there is "fully healthy," because Nimmo's 92 games played last year were the second most of his career. But that injury risk is baked into his ADP, so draft him late and start him when he's in the lineup. You likely won't be disappointed if you do.
82 Jeff McNeil (NYM - 2B,LF,RF) 265 64 114 84.1 8.6 289.0 +24.0
McNeil's 2019 power outburst looks like a total anomaly, as he hit just seven home runs last year. His usual reliable batting average bottomed out to just .251 as he played through injury, but most of his underlying metrics looked strong. He'll rarely strike out, but there's just not that much that he can offer given his lack of power and speed. Worse still, he'll likely now bat in the bottom third of the Mets' batting order with the team's additions. There's little reason to consider McNeil in any capacity this year unless he somehow finds his power stroke.
83 Kyle Lewis (SEA - CF,DH) MiLB 278 54 134 91.7 12.2 328.0 +50.0
Lewis is dealing with knee issues and likely won't be ready for Opening Day. When healthy, he's a talented but low-floor option, as he doesn't have a ton of speed or power and his strikeout rate (29.5% career) keeps his batting average in check. He's just 26 years old so, of course, there's upside for more. But the knee issues are enough of a reason to look elsewhere when you're considering a late-round outfielder.
84 Raimel Tapia (TOR - CF,LF,RF) 271 60 138 87.7 17.2 366.0 +95.0
Tapia moves from Colorado to Toronto, and although that's an obvious downgrade in terms of home park, it's pretty much as neutral a change as Tapia could have hoped for. He'll still play his home games in an extreme hitter-friendly environment, and he'll see a major upgrade in his surrounding lineup. The problem for Tapia, however, remains the same. He has extremely meager power numbers, and not enough speed to be a true difference-maker in the stolen base category (though he did swipe 20 last year). He'll almost certainly bat in the lower third of the lineup with Toronto, as he likely would have with the Rockies anyway, and his probable increase in runs scored should be canceled out by his likely drop in batting average (his xBA has been in the .250s in each of the last three seasons). There's little upside with Tapia, but he won't hurt you, so he's a decent bench option if you're light on steals.
85 Gavin Lux (LAD - 2B,SS,LF,CF) 274 58 111 85.9 9.1 260.0 -14.0
 
86 Tyler Naquin (NYM - CF,DH,LF,RF) 312 61 112 91.6 10.6 436.0 +124.0
 
87 Josh Rojas (ARI - 2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 293 54 126 89.9 11.2 274.0 -19.0
Rojas chipped in last year, but he didn't quite meet expectations placed on him after a strong spring. He came a steal short of reaching double digits in both home runs and steals, but his expected stats leave little to be desired. He's got position flexibility and won't hurt you while he's in there, but he's not someone you can draft as a starter and feel confident about. Expect a similar line to last year.
88 Joc Pederson (SF - CF,DH,LF,RF) 302 75 132 93.3 9.6 351.0 +49.0
 
89 Adam Frazier (SEA - 2B,LF,RF) 291 69 123 92.1 9.5 297.0 +6.0
 
90 Patrick Wisdom (CHC - 1B,3B,LF,RF) 289 63 123 92.3 10.6 300.0 +11.0
 
91 Dominic Smith (NYM - 1B,DH,LF) MiLB 308 37 137 94.7 13.1 329.0 +21.0
 
92 Manuel Margot (TB - CF,DH,LF,RF) 307 66 111 93.2 8.4 442.0 +135.0
 
93 David Peralta (TB - DH,LF) 315 71 142 95.5 12.7 412.0 +97.0
 
94 Lane Thomas (WSH - LF,CF,RF) 318 72 113 91.3 9.4 373.0 +55.0
 
95 Garrett Hampson (COL - 2B,3B,CF,DH,SS) 304 75 137 96.4 13.0 324.0 +20.0
 
96 Connor Joe (COL - 1B,DH,LF,RF) IL10 328 63 140 98.8 14.6 334.0 +6.0
 
97 Cavan Biggio (TOR - 1B,2B,3B,RF) 298 67 128 92.6 13.4 310.0 +12.0
 
98 Nick Senzel (CIN - 2B,CF,DH) IL60 324 56 145 94.1 18.2 345.0 +21.0
 
99 Willie Calhoun (SF - LF,DH) MiLB 375 70 128 102.2 12.6 450.0 +75.0
 
100 Luis Arraez (MIN - 1B,2B,3B,DH,LF) 373 79 125 98.7 9.9 313.0 -60.0
 
101 Rafael Ortega (CHC - CF,DH,LF,RF) IL60 347 70 120 97.4 10.6 378.0 +31.0
 
102 LaMonte Wade Jr. (SF - 1B,DH,LF,RF) 360 80 158 101.6 12.3 386.0 +26.0
 
103 Hunter Dozier (KC - 1B,3B,DH,LF,RF) 389 85 134 104.3 9.4 396.0 +7.0
 
104 Garrett Cooper (MIA - 1B,DH,RF) IL10 380 72 128 104.5 11.3 525.0 +145.0
 
105 Victor Robles (WSH - CF) 387 89 134 106.6 9.8 454.0 +67.0
 
106 Pavin Smith (ARI - 1B,CF,DH,LF,RF) 363 85 127 105.3 9.6 430.0 +67.0
 
107 Lorenzo Cain (CF) FA 354 57 140 99.3 14.6 354.0
 
108 Josh Harrison (CWS - 2B,3B,SS,LF) 366 82 176 106.4 17.7 336.0 -30.0
 
109 Jarren Duran (BOS - CF,RF) MiLB 398 82 156 111.6 15.6 357.0 -41.0
 
110 Aaron Hicks (NYY - CF,LF) 431 81 139 112.8 10.6 465.0 +34.0
 
111 Eric Haase (DET - C,DH,LF) 397 71 156 111.4 14.2 303.0 -94.0
 
112 Josh Lowe (TB - CF,DH,LF,RF) MiLB 325 62 185 93.6 25.8 312.0 -13.0
 
113 Brandon Marsh (PHI - CF,LF) 367 72 130 101.4 14.5 429.0 +62.0
 
114 Michael A. Taylor (KC - CF) 414 89 346 119.8 39.9 533.0 +119.0
 
115 Yoshi Tsutsugo (TOR - 1B,DH,LF,RF) MiLB 416 79 163 115.0 13.5 495.0 +79.0
 
116 Kyle Isbel (KC - CF,LF,RF) 456 91 164 118.7 14.6 552.0 +96.0
 
117 Dylan Moore (SEA - 2B,3B,CF,LF,RF,SS) 515 100 178 124.3 17.1 421.0 -94.0
 
118 Austin Slater (SF - LF,CF,RF) 573 106 161 124.7 12.0 488.0 -85.0
 
119 Riley Greene (DET - CF) 411 62 160 115.6 17.4 286.0 -125.0
 
120 Vidal Brujan (TB - 2B,RF) MiLB 402 82 157 120.2 16.2 392.0 -10.0
 
121 Harold Ramirez (TB - 1B,CF,DH,LF,RF) 466 90 347 136.9 53.0    
 
122 Kole Calhoun (TEX - DH,LF,RF) 408 92 143 116.2 10.4 451.0 +43.0
 
123 Jake Fraley (CIN - CF,DH,LF,RF) 417 73 129 109.8 13.4 483.0 +66.0
 
124 Darin Ruf (NYM - 1B,DH,LF,RF) IL10 421 64 143 113.7 17.9 414.0 -7.0
 
125 Bradley Zimmer (TOR - CF,RF) 428 86 155 119.0 17.5 538.0 +110.0
 
126 Tony Kemp (OAK - 2B,LF) 426 77 164 112.6 15.8 457.0 +31.0
 
127 Justin Upton (DH,LF) FA 579 109 170 130.7 13.3 501.0 -78.0
 
128 Sam Hilliard (COL - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 460 89 144 115.9 12.0 514.0 +54.0
 
129 Jackson Frazier (CHC - LF,RF) MiLB 471 85 148 122.2 16.2 469.0 -2.0
 
130 Jorge Mateo (BAL - 2B,SS,CF) 401 65 158 106.8 21.8 443.0 +42.0
 
131 Seth Brown (OAK - 1B,CF,LF,RF) 443 88 133 113.3 11.3 512.0 +69.0
 
132 DJ Stewart (BAL - DH,LF,RF) MiLB 649 98 331 142.0 45.4    
 
133 Brad Miller (TEX - 1B,2B,3B,DH,LF,RF) IL60 436 94 188 122.4 19.9 571.0 +135.0
 
134 Gavin Sheets (CWS - 1B,RF,DH) 404 83 133 115.1 12.4 448.0 +44.0
 
135 Jorge Alfaro (SD - C,DH,LF) 415 80 151 121.1 18.4 456.0 +41.0
 
136 Steven Kwan (CLE - CF,LF,RF) 420 79 170 112.2 28.4 468.0 +48.0
 
137 Chas McCormick (HOU - LF,CF,RF) 561 84 171 129.3 19.5 527.0 -34.0
 
138 Jurickson Profar (SD - 1B,2B,CF,DH,LF,RF) 489 98 145 126.9 11.8 549.0 +60.0
 
139 Ben Gamel (PIT - CF,DH,LF,RF) 452 91 160 127.6 15.6 678.0 +226.0
 
140 Tyrone Taylor (MIL - LF,CF,RF) 500 100 143 125.8 12.4 536.0 +36.0
 
141 Odubel Herrera (CF,LF,RF) FA 564 100 148 128.3 13.9 658.0 +94.0
 
142 Chad Pinder (OAK - 2B,3B,DH,LF,RF) 556 112 156 132.7 11.4 597.0 +41.0
 
143 Jordan Luplow (ARI - 1B,CF,DH,LF,RF) 716 106 170 139.8 16.2    
 
144 Yadiel Hernandez (WSH - DH,LF,RF) IL60 536 83 159 136.6 14.9 666.0 +130.0
 
145 Anthony Alford (LF,CF) FA 563 90 151 134.4 12.5 590.0 +27.0
 
146 Corey Dickerson (STL - CF,DH,LF,RF) 661 117 155 139.2 12.1 676.0 +15.0
 
147 Josh Naylor (CLE - 1B,DH,RF) 673 109 175 140.2 16.0 610.0 -63.0
 
148 Riley Green (HS - OF) UDP 449 68 94 80.7 10.6    
 
149 Leury Garcia (CWS - 2B,3B,SS,LF,CF,RF) 615 106 160 136.7 13.6 470.0 -145.0
 
150 Aristides Aquino (CIN - LF,CF,RF) 583 97 164 140.2 11.8 689.0 +106.0
 
151 Kevin Kiermaier (TB - CF) IL60 587 117 154 136.4 13.0 626.0 +39.0
 
152 Stephen Piscotty (CIN - DH,LF,RF) MiLB 705 120 164 145.4 9.4 750.0 +45.0
 
153 Niko Goodrum (2B,SS,LF) FA 733 117 163 147.0 14.4 660.0 -73.0
 
154 Tyler Wade (NYY - 2B,3B,SS,CF) MiLB 608 108 168 147.3 16.9 428.0 -180.0
 
155 Jose Barrero (CIN - SS,CF) 707 112 160 144.1 14.0 528.0 -179.0
 
156 Oscar Mercado (CLE - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 626 123 172 149.3 15.1 684.0 +58.0
 
157 Nick Gordon (MIN - 2B,SS,LF,CF) 684 107 188 153.1 21.4 602.0 -82.0
 
158 Bryan De La Cruz (MIA - CF,DH,LF,RF) 542 92 184 146.9 24.9 539.0 -3.0
 
159 Victor Reyes (DET - CF,LF,RF) 660 129 169 150.9 12.9 578.0 -82.0
 
160 Adam Engel (CWS - CF,RF) 750 138 176 156.4 10.8 761.0 +11.0
 
161 Jake Meyers (HOU - CF) 653 114 157 140.8 11.6 616.0 -37.0
 
162 Cristian Pache (OAK - CF) 613 122 179 152.0 13.9 611.0 -2.0
 
163 Jackie Bradley Jr. (TOR - LF,CF,RF) 700 143 172 156.3 10.5 494.0 -206.0
 
164 Trevor Larnach (MIN - LF,RF) IL60 709 120 179 153.6 22.9 555.0 -154.0
 
165 Gregory Polanco (RF) FA 1159 112 299 198.3 75.8 604.0 -555.0
 
166 Cole Tucker (ARI - 2B,SS,RF) MiLB 609 107 189 157.0 24.0 621.0 +12.0
 
167 Kevin Pillar (LAD - LF,CF,RF) IL60 629 120 191 155.0 18.0 756.0 +127.0
 
168 Alex Dickerson (ATL - DH,LF) MiLB 826 100 177 157.4 15.1 603.0 -223.0
 
169 Matt Vierling (PHI - 1B,3B,CF,LF,RF) 622 105 168 150.0 20.0 510.0 -112.0
 
170 Jason Heyward (CHC - CF,RF) IL60 773 136 174 158.4 6.8 572.0 -201.0
 
171 Matt Beaty (1B,LF,RF) FA 632 102 179 162.2 16.2 679.0 +47.0
 
172 Edward Olivares (KC - DH,LF,RF) 625 99 193 162.6 22.9 588.0 -37.0
 
173 David Dahl (LF,RF) FA 1090 111 271 192.9 54.0    
 
174 Lars Nootbaar (STL - CF,LF,RF) 759 140 176 160.6 9.9 491.0 -268.0
 
175 Alek Thomas (ARI - CF) MiLB 769 93 170 154.4 12.2 562.0 -207.0
 
176 Steven Duggar (CF,LF) FA 779 152 171 163.9 6.0 765.0 -14.0
 
177 Aledmys Diaz (HOU - 1B,2B,3B,DH,LF,SS) 888 135 189 165.1 12.9 505.0 -383.0
 
178 Michael Taylor (LF,RF) FA   97 148 122.5 25.5    
 
179 Willi Castro (DET - 2B,CF,LF,RF,SS) IL10 764 104 221 171.8 33.1 458.0 -306.0
 
180 Jose Siri (TB - CF,RF) 713 124 205 168.9 22.9 573.0 -140.0
 
181 Brent Rooker (KC - LF,RF) MiLB 636 113 186 169.7 14.7 808.0 +172.0
 
182 Jake McCarthy (ARI - CF,DH,LF,RF) 886 121 181 164.6 12.2    
 
183 Greg Allen (PIT - CF,LF,RF) MiLB 882 120 200 170.4 22.3 754.0 -128.0
 
184 Leody Taveras (TEX - CF) 674 127 178 168.0 7.2 582.0 -92.0
 
185 Cooper Hummel (ARI - C,DH,LF) 893 141 203 172.4 22.4    
 
186 Eric Thames (1B,RF) FA 723 139 181 169.2 14.2 744.0 +21.0
 
187 Corey Ray (MIL - RF) MiLB 784 145 291 233.6 68.7    
 
188 Drew Waters (KC - CF,LF,RF) 664 125 269 201.8 53.4 825.0 +161.0
 
189 Yonathan Daza (COL - LF,CF,RF) 765 146 185 173.0 10.8 812.0 +47.0
 
190 Jose Marmolejos (1B,LF) FA 696 134 314 224.0 90.0    
 
191 Adam Eaton (RF) FA 842 133 188 179.0 13.4    
 
192 Brett Gardner (LF,CF) FA 915 150 187 175.2 10.1    
 
193 Nomar Mazara (RF) FA 952 163 202 179.6 13.8    
 
194 Ryan O'Hearn (KC - 1B,RF,DH) 1066 150 237 199.2 32.4    
 
195 TJ Friedl (CIN - CF,LF,RF) 787 148 232 189.8 29.7    
 
196 Brennen Davis (CHC - CF) MiLB 789 149 203 181.3 20.0 440.0 -349.0
 
197 Ryan Vilade (COL - LF) MiLB 791 150 234 195.3 30.3    
 
198 Luke Williams (MIA - 2B,3B,CF,LF) MiLB 1069 150 232 199.8 33.3    
 
199 Orlando Arcia (ATL - 2B,DH,LF) 788 150 192 180.4 15.6    
 
200 Adam Haseley (CWS - CF,RF) MiLB 795 154 252 188.8 30.1    
 
201 Daniel Johnson (WSH - LF,RF) MiLB 1097 151 254 212.5 43.5    
 
202 Andrew Stevenson (WSH - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 818 166 217 184.6 18.6    
 
203 Brian O'Grady (CF,RF) FA 793 152 327 239.5 87.5    
 
204 Taylor Ward (LAA - LF,CF,RF) 960 153 205 185.7 23.2 800.0 -160.0
 
205 Mickey Moniak (LAA - CF,LF) IL10 792 157 207 193.8 21.3 541.0 -251.0
 
206 Lewis Brinson (SF - LF,CF) MiLB 1045 161 229 200.2 24.6 832.0 -213.0
 
207 Jake Bauers (NYY - 1B,LF,RF) MiLB 798 162 262 218.3 40.8 659.0 -139.0
 
208 Ehire Adrianza (ATL - 2B,3B,LF,RF) 1031 162 219 193.3 20.8    
 
209 Daz Cameron (DET - CF,RF) MiLB 821 167 218 190.4 17.7 797.0 -24.0
 
210 Tim Locastro (NYY - CF,DH,LF,RF) MiLB 1035 165 233 200.5 24.6 642.0 -393.0
 
211 Zach McKinstry (CHC - 2B,3B,LF,RF,SS) 1063 170 228 196.2 24.3 592.0 -471.0
 
212 Mauricio Dubon (HOU - 2B,3B,CF,LF,SS) 1061 167 227 190.3 18.4 727.0 -334.0
 
213 Dillon Thomas (LAA - LF,RF) MiLB 1158 168 290 249.3 57.5    
 
214 Dexter Fowler (RF) FA 974 172 219 193.0 18.4    
 
215 Jace Peterson (MIL - 1B,2B,3B,LF,RF) 772 135 197 183.4 7.5 496.0 -276.0
 
216 Miguel Andujar (PIT - DH,LF) 838 173 222 197.0 17.4 595.0 -243.0
 
217 Taylor Trammell (SEA - CF,LF,RF) MiLB 1078 181 255 217.8 29.6 835.0 -243.0
 
218 Danny Santana (1B,CF) FA 1004 181 236 201.8 22.0    
 
219 Shogo Akiyama (CF) FA 1026 182 244 203.0 24.6    
 
220 Marwin Gonzalez (NYY - 1B,2B,3B,LF,RF,SS) 1037 182 212 203.0 12.3 519.0 -518.0
 
221 Brett Phillips (BAL - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 1012 183 208 190.3 10.3 569.0 -443.0
 
222 Jake Lamb (3B,DH,LF,RF) FA 1091 185 249 223.0 25.4 669.0 -422.0
 
223 Heliot Ramos (SF - CF,RF) MiLB 1043 185 217 207.0 13.0 811.0 -232.0
 
224 Scott Kingery (PHI - RF) MiLB 1084 190 260 237.5 28.2    
 
225 Max Schrock (2B,LF) FA 1015 190 222 207.0 13.1    
 
226 Brian Goodwin (CF,RF) FA 1024 191 220 203.0 12.4    
 
227 Travis Swaggerty (PIT - CF) MiLB 1036 193 212 205.0 8.5 773.0 -263.0
 
228 Phil Gosselin (1B,2B,3B,LF) FA 1022 194 242 219.0 19.6 575.0 -447.0
 
229 Michael Hermosillo (CHC - CF,RF) MiLB 1079 194 238 216.0 18.0    
 
230 Charlie Culberson (TEX - 2B,3B,DH,LF) 1039 196 230 213.0 13.9    
 
231 Jarrod Dyson (LF,CF,RF) FA 1023 196 226 211.7 12.3    
 
232 Guillermo Heredia (ATL - CF,DH,LF,RF) 1029 197 228 208.7 13.8    
 
233 Juan Lagares (LF,CF,RF) FA 1025 199 225 211.7 10.6    
 
234 Shed Long Jr. (2B,LF) FA 1042 200 216 209.0 6.7    
 
235 Mason Martin (PIT - 1B,LF) MiLB 1076 202 238 225.0 16.3    
 
236 Jake Marisnick (ATL - LF,CF) MiLB 1034 203 232 214.3 12.7 873.0 -161.0
 
237 Eli White (TEX - LF,CF,RF) IL60 1041 204 235 218.0 12.8    
 
238 Derek Hill (SEA - CF) MiLB 1032 204 215 209.7 4.5 850.0 -182.0
 
239 Luis Rengifo (LAA - 2B,3B,RF,SS) 1040 205 214 210.7 4.0    
 
240 Jose Rojas (2B,3B,RF) FA 1081 206 241 229.0 16.3 654.0 -427.0
 
241 Luke Raley (TB - LF,RF) MiLB 1109 208 258 235.0 20.6    
 
242 Josh Reddick (RF) FA 1038 212 313 272.3 43.5 851.0 -187.0
 
243 Romy Gonzalez (CWS - 2B,3B,RF) 1112 214 259 239.3 18.8    
 
244 Wilmer Difo (2B,3B,RF) FA 1094 214 251 238.3 17.2    
 
245 Estevan Florial (NYY - CF) MiLB 1060 217 226 221.0 3.7    
 
246 Danny Mendick (CWS - 2B,SS,RF) IL60 1085 218 244 227.7 11.6    
 
247 Rob Refsnyder (BOS - CF,DH,LF,RF) 1047 219 241 232.0 9.4    
 
248 Monte Harrison (LAA - CF,LF) MiLB 1048 220 283 261.3 29.2    
 
249 Billy McKinney (OAK - 1B,LF,RF) MiLB 1187 222 311 263.0 36.7    
 
250 Ryan McKenna (BAL - CF,DH,LF,RF) 1087 223 246 231.7 10.2    
 
251 Travis Jankowski (NYM - CF,LF,RF) MiLB 1056 223 242 230.7 8.2 697.0 -359.0
 
252 Zach Reks (LF) FA 1114 224 261 248.3 17.2    
 
253 Alfonso Rivas (CHC - 1B,LF,RF)   224 261 242.5 18.5    
 
254 Luis Barrera (OAK - LF,RF) MiLB 1058 224 245 236.0 8.8    
 
255 Skye Bolt (OAK - CF) MiLB 1132 225 272 242.0 21.3    
 
256 Matt Joyce (LF,RF) FA 1059 225 246 237.0 8.8    
 
257 Kyle Garlick (MIN - LF,RF) IL10 1093 227 250 238.0 9.4 867.0 -226.0
 
258 Aaron Altherr (LF,CF,RF) FA 1064 229 308 275.0 33.5    
 
259 Tyler Nevin (BAL - 1B,3B,LF) 1104 230 258 248.3 13.0    
 
260 Chris Owings (NYY - 2B,LF,RF,SS) MiLB 1128 231 270 255.0 17.1 683.0 -445.0
 
261 Ian Desmond (LF,CF) RET 1067 231 263 247.3 13.1    
 
262 Gilberto Celestino (MIN - CF,LF,RF) 1113 231 260 249.7 13.2    
 
263 Franchy Cordero (BOS - 1B,LF,RF) IL60 1072 233 261 247.0 11.4    
 
264 Jared Oliva (PIT - RF) MiLB 1077 233 253 240.7 8.8 667.0 -410.0
 
265 Taylor Jones (SF - 1B,LF) MiLB 1098 234 254 241.0 9.2    
 
266 Jake Cave (MIN - LF,CF,RF) 1073 234 252 241.3 7.7    
 
267 Cody Thomas (OAK - LF,RF) MiLB 1080 239 257 247.7 7.4    
 
268 Christin Stewart (BOS - LF,RF) MiLB 1082 241 250 246.7 4.0    
 
269 Roman Quinn (TB - CF,LF,RF) IL10 1083 242 259 252.3 7.4    
 
270 DJ Peters (WSH - LF,CF,RF) MiLB 1121 243 266 254.3 9.4 829.0 -292.0
 
271 Khalil Lee (NYM - RF) MiLB 1088 244 265 252.0 9.3    
 
272 Billy Hamilton (MIN - LF,CF) 1086 245 262 251.0 7.8 625.0 -461.0
 
273 Josh Palacios (WSH - LF,RF) 1122 248 267 260.0 8.5    
 
274 Magneuris Sierra (LAA - LF,CF) DFA 1120 249 269 261.0 8.6    
 
275 Alejo Lopez (CIN - 2B,3B,DH,LF) 1143 251 278 265.0 11.0    
 
276 Jose Rondon (RF) FA 1145 253 280 267.0 11.0    
 
277 Micker Adolfo (CWS - RF) MiLB 1142 255 277 266.7 9.0    
 
278 Delino DeShields (ATL - CF) MiLB 1103 256 272 265.0 6.7 674.0 -429.0
 
279 Steven Souza Jr. (RF) RET 1140 259 275 269.0 7.1    
 
280 Abraham Almonte (BOS - LF) 1115 262 295 278.5 16.5    
 
281 Albert Almora Jr. (CF,LF,RF) FA 1116 263 285 274.0 11.0    
 
282 Nelson Velazquez (CHC - CF,LF,RF) 1118 264 284 275.0 8.3    
 
283 Donovan Casey (WSH - CF) MiLB 1125 264 270 267.3 2.5    
 
284 Ender Inciarte (CF) FA 1129 266 280 272.3 5.8    
 
285 Yusniel Diaz (BAL - CF,RF) MiLB 1157 267 289 276.0 9.4    
 
286 Ryan McBroom (1B,DH,RF) FA 1127 269 273 271.0 1.6    
 
287 Pedro Leon (HOU - SS,CF) MiLB 1218 270 313 286.0 19.2 839.0 -379.0
 
288 Trayce Thompson (LAD - CF,LF,RF) 1138 273 293 283.0 10.0    
 
289 Austin Dean (SF - LF) MiLB 1139 274 291 281.3 7.1    
 
290 Hunter Owen (PIT - RF) MiLB 1148 274 283 278.3 3.7    
 
291 Travis Demeritte (ATL - 2B,LF,RF,SS) MiLB 1147 275 282 279.7 3.3    
 
292 Johneshwy Fargas (CF) FA 1155 276 287 281.5 5.5    
 
293 Jaylin Davis (BOS - LF) MiLB 1141 276 286 281.7 4.2    
 
294 Brendon Davis (DET - 3B,LF) 1184 277 309 288.0 14.9 855.0 -329.0
 
295 Peyton Burdick (MIA - LF,CF) 1167 279 302 293.3 10.2    
 
296 Scott Schebler (CF,RF) FA 1144 279 289 284.0 5.0    
 
297 Nick Martini (LF,RF) FA 1164 280 295 287.0 6.2    
 
298 Jonathan Davis (MIL - CF) IL10 1146 281 297 287.3 6.9    
 
299 Stuart Fairchild (CIN - CF,LF) 1154 281 296 287.7 6.2    
 
300 Dustin Fowler (CF) FA 1166 282 297 289.5 7.5    
 
301 Phillip Evans (NYY - 1B,3B,LF,RF) MiLB 1150 284 326 305.0 21.0 685.0 -465.0
 
302 Greg Deichmann (RF) FA 1152 285 301 291.0 7.1    
 
303 JJ Bleday (MIA - CF,LF,RF) 1161 285 294 290.7 4.0 803.0 -358.0
 
304 Kyle Stowers (BAL - DH,LF,RF) 1172 287 303 295.0 8.0    
 
305 Trey Amburgey (RF) FA 1156 288 322 305.0 17.0    
 
306 Blake Rutherford (CWS - CF,LF) MiLB 1183 289 308 300.7 8.3    
 
307 Simon Muzziotti (PHI - CF) IL60 1168 291 301 296.0 5.0    
 
308 Ka'ai Tom (LF) FA 1163 294 307 300.5 6.5    
 
309 Gerardo Parra (LF) RET 1165 296 300 298.0 2.0    
 
310 Rusney Castillo (LF,CF,RF) FA   298 332 315.0 17.0    
 
311 Justin Williams (PHI - LF,RF) MiLB   300 342 321.0 21.0    
 
312 Jorge Ona (SD - LF,RF) MiLB 1171 302 312 307.0 5.0    
 
313 Mike Tauchman (LF,CF,RF) FA 1181 303 307 305.0 2.0    
 
314 Michael Reed (LF,RF) FA   304 345 324.5 20.5    
 
315 Nick Plummer (NYM - CF,DH,LF,RF) MiLB 1173 304 305 304.5 0.5    
 
316 Derek Fisher (RF) FA 1178 306 306 306.0 0.0    
 
317 JaCoby Jones (CF) FA 1189 309 312 310.5 1.5    
 
318 Scott Hurst (STL - CF) MiLB 1186 310 311 310.5 0.5