2019 Fantasy Baseball Rankings

Expert Consensus Ranking (59 of 62 Experts) -
Rank Player (Team, Position) Overall Notes
1 Trea Turner (WSH - SS) DL10 7 1 6 1.5 1.1 8.0 +1.0
Turner didn't break fantasy baseball the way some backers hoped, but 2017 was by no means a disappointment. His 43 steals ranked second behind Whit Merrifield, and his pop properly prorated to 16 homers over 162 games. As arguably the biggest knock against him last spring, simply playing a full season marked a huge step toward trusting the shortstop as a first-round investment. A .271 batting average blocked a true ascent into top-tier territory. Yet the career .289 hitter improved his contact (81.7%) and walk (9.3%) rates, so he should earn more opportunities to run. Turner still merits a top-10 distinction in five-by-five roto leagues.
2 Alex Bregman (HOU - 3B,SS) 15 1 6 3.2 1.3 13.0 -2.0
Bregman's superstar ascension featured a stellar .286/.394/.532 slash line, 32 homers, and more walks (96) than strikeouts (85). He finished among the top five in contact, outside-swing, and swinging-strike rates, so the elite plate approach could feasibly net a .300 average in 2019. Yet a .463 xSLG suggests he hit his power ceiling, which is concerning considering the drop in steals (10). Drafters now must also monitor his progress from offseason arthroscopic surgery on his elbow, making Bregman a dicey proposition in the first round.
3 Manny Machado (SD - 3B,SS) 16 1 23 3.6 1.2 17.0 +1.0
Along with setting personal highs in each element of his .297/.367/.538 slash line, Machado bashed 37 homers and stole 14 bases, a significant development since he stole none in 2016. He has hit 33 homers in at least 690 plate appearances in each of the last four seasons, so he'd probably be considered a first-round lock if not for remaining unsigned. Now that he established 2017's funk as the clear outlier, Machado is a trustworthy stud eligible for shortstop and third (16 games) in most formats. Signing the Padres doesn't kill his worth, but he's someone to target near the Round ½ turn rather than inside the top 10.
4 Trevor Story (COL - SS) 17 1 7 3.7 1.3 20.0 +3.0
Story bounced back from a wretched 2017 and improved upon 2016's breakout. Slicing his strikeout rate from 34.4 to 25.6% helped him bat .291, and he stole 27 bases (19 more than his previous career high) alongside 37 long balls. A full repeat would make him an easy first rounder, but his contact skills still don't support such a high batting average. Statcast's .261 xAVG agrees. He's still a shortstop who calls Coors Field home, and regression could still offer 30/20 campaign, so don't shy away since the late-second round price accounts for these concerns.
5 Javier Baez (CHC - 2B,3B,SS) 23 1 9 4.9 1.5 18.0 -5.0
Despite recording the second-worst swinging strike (18.2%) and outside-swing (45.5%) rates, Baez managed to hit .290. Among 17 hitters with a contact rate of 70.0% or lower in at least 300 plate appearances, Aaron Judge was the only one besides Baez to bat above .266. That's a better baseline for 2019. Given his middling 4.5 walk %, he might not reach base enough to steal another 21 bases. Don't pay full freight for an encore.
6 Francisco Lindor (CLE - SS) 27 1 18 5.1 2.6 12.0 -15.0
Coming off a tremendous season, Lindor would arguably deserve to be in a tier of his own at shortstop if he hadn't suffered a strained calf in early February. As it is, he falls into a similar category of player as Javier Baez and Trevor Story: shortstops coming off of 30-20 seasons who have sky-high upside but also a bit of risk. The concern for Lindor is that he misses the beginning of the season and/or doesn't run as much upon his return, but the good news is that he was so good last year that they can afford to drop off a bit and still remain an elite fantasy option.
7 Xander Bogaerts (BOS - SS) 41 4 12 7.7 1.1 45.0 +4.0
Other elite shortstop peers have passed Bogaerts by, but he rebounded from a 2017 mired by a wrist injury to hit a quiet .288/.360/.522 with 23 homers and 103 RBI. He set career-highs in walks, hard-hit rate, barrels, and launch angle in his age-25 season, so drafters should believe in his power surge. This is the player everyone has wanted for years, but the five-category contributor-swinging in the heart of a loaded lineup-will slip to the fourth or fifth round due to a lack of elite power and speed.
8 Carlos Correa (HOU - SS) 44 3 14 8.3 1.7 44.0
Injuries have limited Correa to 109 and 110 games over the last two seasons, respectively. He stole five bases combined and saw his wOBA plummet from .394 to .313, which was even higher than his .306 xwOBA. Because of his age (24) and instant success upon reaching the majors, there's little discount after the down year. He's too risky in the top-three rounds, but it's hard to ignore the MVP upside if he slips.
9 Adalberto Mondesi (KC - 2B,SS) 47 5 23 9.2 2.6 43.0 -4.0
If you pro-rate Mondesi's 75 games to a full season, it comes out to 30 homers, 68 steals and 100 RBIs. I don't need to tell you that a season like that would put him above Mike Trout from a fantasy perspective. Granted, he is due for some regression, but don't hesitate to reach several rounds to get him on your roster.
10 Jean Segura (PHI - SS) DL10 50 6 14 9.9 1.4 64.0 +14.0
After hitting .300 with 11 homers and 22 steals in 2017, Segura was undervalued in 2018 drafts. He followed up the useful decline from 2016's breakout by batting .304 with 10 homers and 20 steals last season. He's undervalued again. Of the 28 players who stole at least 20 bases in 2018, only 10 hit over .280. Moving to Citizens Bank Park could help him smack a few more long balls and potentially score another 90-plus runs if batting high in a replenished lineup. Simply repeating recent performance would make him worth a look anywhere outside the top-50 picks in 5x5 roto formats.
11 Corey Seager (LAD - SS) 63 7 17 10.9 1.7 69.0 +6.0
After undergoing season-ending Tommy John surgery, Seager also had arthroscopic surgery on his hip in August. He's optimistic about his Opening Day availability, but drafters are still proceeding with caution. It doesn't help that he has never offered more than 26 homers or four steals in a single season. Let's not forget, however, that the 24-year-old shortstop is a career .302/.374/.494 hitter. There's plenty of profit potential if he returns healthy.
12 Gleyber Torres (NYY - 2B,SS) 72 8 18 11.6 1.8 61.0 -11.0
Torres isn't a big contributor in stolen bases, but he is plenty useful in each of the other four main categories. If you expand his rates out to a full season, Torres would have posted 32 homers, 101 RBIs and a .271 batting average. You would be thrilled to get that type of production out of your seventh round shortstop.
13 Jose Peraza (CIN - SS) 103 10 22 13.7 1.8 109.0 +6.0
Peraza's steady skills came with a massive spike in contact (.288 BA) and power (14 HRs, 31 2Bs), turning a bit player into a significant five-by-five contributor. A rise in fly balls, hard hits, and launch angle accompanied the power boost, so he could reasonably reach double-digit homers again. His batting average has fluctuated sharply by year, so he's not quite a bankable star just yet. He is, however, a steady option with few 20-base stealers capable of also hitting .280 with 10 homers.
14 Tim Anderson (CWS - SS) 140 8 28 16.5 2.9 135.0 -5.0
Anderson's .240 average? Meh. His .281 OBP? Gross. Twenty homers and 24 steals from a 25-year-old shortstop? Well, that's pretty good. A horrible real-life hitter, he can fill two of fantasy's most essential categories. After logging 606 plate appearances in each of the past two seasons, he appears in no danger of losing playing time for his ineffective bat. Be sure to have some high-average hitters in place before taking Anderson, and don't touch him in a points league.
15 Jonathan Villar (BAL - 2B,SS) 110 9 21 13.9 2.6 87.0 -23.0
After getting shipped out of Milwaukee to Baltimore, Villar won some leagues down the stretch. In 54 games with his new club, the middle infielder batted .258 with eight homers and 21 steals. Like Adalberto Mondesi, he offers mouth-watering steals upside with a chance to also deliver 15-20 long balls. Unlike Mondesi, Villar can draw a walk. He also manifested this fantastical ceiling when batting .285 with 19 homers and 62 steals in 2016. Oh yeah, he's also much cheaper. A poor contact profile presents significant batting-average downside, but the speed makes him a tantalizing upside pick.
16 Jurickson Profar (OAK - 1B,2B,3B,SS) 162 13 29 18.7 3.6 140.0 -22.0
It took a bit longer than expected, but Profar finally emerged as a strong major leaguer by batting .254/.335/.458 with 20 homers and 10 steals. The Rangers oddly moved him to the A's, a move that presents a major ballpark downgrade after he slugged .511 in Arlington. Aside from a possible average uptick, the skills don't portend another leap forward. Perhaps the biggest incentive to drafting Profar is gleaning eligibility at first base, third, shortstop, and even second (10 games) in some leagues.
17 Paul DeJong (STL - SS) 152 13 30 18.8 3.5 170.0 +18.0
Since joining the league, DeJong is fifth among shortstops in homers per trip to the plate. He is right behind Francisco Lindor and Trevor Story, who are being drafted in the first and second rounds. Granted, the speed is a major difference but the batting average isn't at .275, .267 and .263. If DeJong can stay on the field this year, consensus projections like him to produce a very similar season to Carlos Correa who is being drafted 140 picks higher.
18 Amed Rosario (NYM - SS) 157 14 28 19.0 3.0 172.0 +15.0
Rosario was only 22 years old when everyone started losing faith. After failing to immediately become the next Francisco Lindor, he came to life by batting .284 with five homers and 15 steals over the final two months. He spent most of that stretch atop the Mets' lineup, a distinction he likely won't reclaim now that walks machine Brandon Nimmo can set the table for Jed Lowrie, Robinson Cano, Wilson Ramos, and Michael Conforto. Getting shunned to the bottom of the batting order is the only reason not to go all in on Rosario, a former top prospect who could still deliver 10 homers and 25 steals with a higher ceiling.
19 Elvis Andrus (TEX - SS) 153 11 28 19.3 3.5 164.0 +11.0
Andrus went from 20 homers and 25 steals to six and five, respectively. The speed drop-off is especially jarring, as he had reached at least 20 steals in each of his last nine MLB seasons. The 30-year-old should bounce back a bit from an elbow injury that contained him to 97 games, but there's some concern since he attempted just eight steals in 2017's second half. While drafters shouldn't pay a significant price for a recovery, there's enough of a track record to bite as an inexpensive middle infielder.
20 Jorge Polanco (MIN - SS) 179 12 34 21.0 4.4 233.0 +54.0
Upon returning from an 80-game PED suspension, Polanco sustained 2017's late progress by batting .288/.345/.427 with six homers and seven steals. Although he doesn't hit the ball with much authority, the 25-year-old shortstop makes contact regularly (85.3%) and rarely whiffs (6.1%). Perhaps drafters don't see enough upside to drive up his price, but he's a strong candidate to hit for a steady-to-strong average with around 15 homers and steals apiece. That could especially make him a middle-infield bargain since a power-heavy Twins lineup has no better fit for the leadoff role.
21 Andrelton Simmons (LAA - SS) 181 14 33 21.6 3.6 221.0 +40.0
Simmons gets slept on because he doesn't stuff a single category, but don't overlook his contact skills. His microscopic 7.3% strikeout rate bested all qualified hitters last season, resulting in a .292 batting average. Yet a rise in value hit rate (10.3%) led xStats to ascribe an even higher .313 xBA. Having stolen 19 bases in 2017, last year's 10 represents a floor rather than the ceiling. He's a boring player to roster during the season, but he'll end up delivering a positive ROI with a high average flanked by around 10 homers and 10-15 steals.
22 Marcus Semien (OAK - SS) 193 11 34 22.1 3.5 220.0 +27.0
Semien always seems to stick around long enough for drafters who want double-digit homers and steals from a cheap middle infielder. He has never reached a 100 wRC+ or batted above .261, so there's limited upside now that 2016's 27 homers stands out as a career outlier. There's also a chance he moves down the batting order, which guarantees he'll come nowhere close to 2018's 703 plate appearance and 89 runs. Here's the good news: You don't need to pay for last year's results. Even if he plates 20 fewer runs, Semien will get the job done with another .250, 15/15-type campaign.
23 Eduardo Escobar (ARI - 3B,SS) 199 13 34 23.4 3.9 176.0 -23.0
 
24 Ketel Marte (ARI - 2B,SS) 228 17 37 25.4 3.9 250.0 +22.0
He didn't quite validate last spring's sleeper appeal, but Marte continued to flash the skills that should prompt drafters to give him another shot. Despite batting .260, he produced a noteworthy 85.9% contact rate while dropping his strikeout rate to 13.4%. He appeared to put it all together when hitting .296/.377/.464 after the All-Star break, and the speed remains existent if ever given the green light. He's a strong middle-infield target who will gain eligibility at center field.
25 Garrett Hampson (COL - 2B,SS) 230 12 35 25.3 5.7 202.0 -28.0
The signing of Daniel Murphy should cause Hampson's ECR to drop another 50 spots, as that transaction shifts Ryan McMahon over to second base. Hampson could force the Rockies hands with a strong Spring, but more than likely, he won't get the call until someone hits the DL. At that point, McMahon could slide over to first, third or the outfield. If it is Story that goes down, Hampson would fill the gap. He could eventually be a better version of D.J. LeMahieu offensively, posting a batting average near .300 with more power and speed. Right away, he will merely hold his own in the batting average department while contributing nearly 30 steals per 162 games.
26 Willy Adames (TB - 2B,SS) 239 16 34 27.3 3.9 274.0 +35.0
Adames broke onto the scene last year as a 22-year-old posting a 19-homer, 11 stolen base pace with a .278 batting average. It was a limited sample size, however, and there are still some holes in his swing. Think of him on the same terms as Dansby Swanson who also had a nice rookie campaign before everyone realized he had quite a bit to go offensively.
27 Asdrubal Cabrera (TEX - 2B,3B,SS) DTD 241 16 39 27.0 4.1 199.0 -42.0
Now that Cabrera is with the Rangers and expected to play every day, we can feel comfortable grabbing him late in drafts as a reliable source of power to go with a decent batting average.
28 Fernando Tatis Jr. (SD - SS) 245 11 56 26.6 9.2 253.0 +8.0
Tatis isn't expected to break camp with the Padres, but it shouldn't take long for him to get the call to San Diego. When he does, you can expect a useful mix of both power and speed and a premium position. He is among the top draft and stash options for those of you that play in leagues with deeper benches or a farm spot.
29 Lourdes Gurriel Jr. (TOR - 2B,SS) MiLB 254 15 42 28.8 4.9 241.0 -13.0
On a 162-game pace, Gurriel was a 27 homer hitter with a .281 batting average and 87 RBIs. He may not keep up that pace with a full season's worth of at bats, but you can argue that is his upside which would make for an exceptional value late in drafts.
30 Chris Taylor (LAD - 2B,SS,LF,CF) 273 16 41 28.1 4.8 211.0 -62.0
With the way the Dodgers' team is constructed, it is tough to tell whether Taylor will see another 500 at-bats this year, but if he does, we are probably looking at 20 homers and double-digit steals to go with a decent batting average and plenty of runs.
31 Marwin Gonzalez (MIN - 1B,2B,SS,LF) 266 20 44 29.4 4.1 232.0 -34.0
Outside of Marwin's huge 2017 season, he hasn't offered much from an offensive perspective. There is some power, but his batting average will hurt fantasy teams and the depth chart doesn't guarantee even 450 at-bats for him.
32 Kike Hernandez (LAD - 1B,2B,SS,LF,CF,RF) 290 16 47 30.7 6.2 288.0 -2.0
Last season we saw a major breakout from Hernandez who was previously a platoon-only bat versus lefties. Kike swatted 21 bombs in just 402 at-bats, and while that may happen again, he offers nothing in terms of speed and is more than likely a .230 batting average guy.
33 Didi Gregorius (NYY - SS) DL60 375 24 44 35.7 4.1 290.0 -85.0
Gregorius finished as a top-seven fantasy shortstop in standard 5x5 leagues last year despite missing a few weeks due to a heel injury. A more significant elbow injury followed during the playoffs, and Gregorius is now expected to miss the first half of the season following Tommy John surgery. The procedure isn't a huge long-term concern for a position player, but whether he is worth drafting comes down to your number of bench spots and DL spots -- not to mention the other shortstop(s) on your roster. He's fully capable of producing 10-15 HRs with a decent batting average and good run production in the second half of the season.
34 Brandon Crawford (SF - SS) 358 27 52 35.2 4.7 376.0 +18.0
Crawford is never going to steal bases or hit for a great average, but you can count on him to play 150 games which will add up in the RBIs and runs department, plus he is good for a dozen homers every year.
35 Niko Goodrum (DET - 1B,2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 345 22 44 33.0 3.6 298.0 -47.0
 
36 Orlando Arcia (MIL - SS) 359 20 44 35.8 3.6 461.0 +102.0
 
37 Dansby Swanson (ATL - SS) 376 24 46 36.7 3.8 330.0 -46.0
Swanson had another rough season for fantasy owners in 2018, batting .238, but he did manage 14 homers and 10 stolen bases in a shortened season and let's not forget that there is untapped potential here as well. He isn't the worst late-round flier.
38 Zack Cozart (LAA - 2B,3B,SS) 355 23 47 35.8 5.2 460.0 +105.0
Cozart may miss time at the start of the season with a mild calf strain, and after his 2018 performance, it is fair to forget about him, but don't be so quick to forget how excellent he was in 2017 with the Reds, knocking 24 homers with a .297 batting average in just 122 games.
39 Nick Ahmed (ARI - SS) 387 31 51 39.4 3.7 484.0 +97.0
 
40 Scott Kingery (PHI - 3B,SS) DL10 435 29 58 40.6 5.0 400.0 -35.0
Kingery was dreadful last year. No one can deny that, but he is still young and offers 20/20 upside if his bat finds a way into the lineup at any number of positions. The is minimal risk at taking a chance on him late in drafts.
41 Tim Beckham (SEA - 3B,SS) 394 26 52 39.1 6.0 392.0 -2.0
 
42 Johan Camargo (ATL - 3B,SS) 398 31 49 39.4 4.1 380.0 -18.0
Camargo flew under the radar last season and somehow swatted 19 homers and batted .272 in a utility role. He should get back to those 450 at-bats this year thanks to all the positions he plays, and we know his bat can be trusted while he is in the lineup.
43 Troy Tulowitzki (NYY - SS) DL10 488 19 59 42.5 6.5 309.0 -179.0
 
44 Freddy Galvis (TOR - SS) 450 24 58 41.6 5.0 614.0 +164.0
 
45 Hernan Perez (MIL - 2B,3B,SS,LF,RF) 455 33 50 43.1 3.9 413.0 -42.0
Although Perez likely won't steal 34 bases like we saw in 2016, he is a sufficient source of speed late into drafts with enough at-bats that he'll add counting stats. There won't be much in the way of power, but his batting average won't kill you either.
46 J.P. Crawford (SEA - 3B,SS) MiLB 523 39 53 45.4 3.7 612.0 +89.0
 
47 Addison Russell (CHC - SS) SUS 621 37 59 46.5 5.9 496.0 -125.0
Russell is starting the season on the DL and although he is a former top prospect, has never shown enough with the bat to warrant a draft and stash in standard-sized leagues. With that said, you can make a case for owning him in deeper formats.
48 Bo Bichette (TOR - SS) MiLB 561 31 71 47.2 8.9 365.0 -196.0
Bichette is an excellent prospect and has a polished bat with plenty of speed. With that said, Bichette has never played above Double-A and the Blue Jays have no need to rush him (see Vlad Jr. last year) so don't be surprised if he doesn't sniff the bigs until September.
49 Aledmys Diaz (HOU - 3B,SS) 562 33 59 46.8 6.4 566.0 +4.0
 
50 Brendan Rodgers (COL - SS) MiLB 575 28 76 49.8 8.1 437.0 -138.0
With the Rockies signing Daniel Murphy, Ryan McMahon shifted over to second base. This puts Rodgers even further away from the bigs, which is saying something because Garrett Hampson was already ahead of him. As it is now, Rodgers doesn't even make sense as a stash and hold in standard sized leagues.
51 Yairo Munoz (STL - 3B,SS,CF) 725 36 66 49.9 6.6 476.0 -249.0
 
52 Daniel Robertson (TB - 2B,3B,SS) 762 41 65 50.8 5.4 500.0 -262.0
 
53 Jose Iglesias (CIN - SS) 896 36 68 53.7 9.0 529.0 -367.0
 
54 Alen Hanson (TOR - 2B,3B,SS,LF) 581 31 56 50.5 4.5 619.0 +38.0
 
55 Yangervis Solarte (SF - 2B,3B,SS) 592 38 56 50.3 4.1 604.0 +12.0
 
56 JT Riddle (MIA - SS) MiLB 626 42 61 50.8 4.5 733.0 +107.0
 
57 Erik Gonzalez (PIT - 1B,2B,3B,SS) DL60 633 39 66 52.5 7.7 688.0 +55.0
 
58 Jordy Mercer (DET - SS) DL10 698 41 63 51.4 6.7 695.0 -3.0
 
59 Richard Rodriguez (SS) MiLB 545 35 67 47.5 12.0 737.0 +192.0
 
60 Richie Martin (BAL - SS) 767 39 67 55.5 7.0 602.0 -165.0
 
61 Mauricio Dubon (MIL - SS) MiLB 635 29 96 61.4 19.1 860.0 +225.0
 
62 Alcides Escobar (SS,CF) FA 747 40 72 55.6 13.2 676.0 -71.0
 
63 Dylan Moore (SEA - SS) 629 28 88 62.3 22.5 1,006.0 +377.0
 
64 Tyler Saladino (MIL - SS) MiLB 596 40 100 63.3 17.8 869.0 +273.0
 
65 Kevin Newman (PIT - SS) DL10 807 33 71 57.3 8.7 682.0 -125.0
 
66 Brock Holt (BOS - 2B,SS,RF) DL10 606 36 66 57.4 5.4 435.0 -171.0
 
67 Cole Tucker (PIT - SS) 1063 43 106 71.0 20.3 847.0 -216.0
 
68 Miguel Rojas (MIA - 1B,3B,SS) 1172 46 76 60.7 8.6 641.0 -531.0
 
69 Charlie Culberson (ATL - 3B,SS,LF) 736 47 65 60.0 3.9 510.0 -226.0
 
70 Brad Miller (1B,2B,SS,DH) FA 808 40 72 62.4 8.5 546.0 -262.0
 
71 Nick Gordon (MIN - SS) MiLB 733 47 97 70.0 15.9 586.0 -147.0
 
72 Alex Blandino (CIN - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 782 49 92 70.0 15.2    
 
73 Adeiny Hechavarria (NYM - SS) MiLB 1305 53 117 84.8 23.1 799.0 -506.0
 
74 Carter Kieboom (WSH - SS) MiLB 774 46 100 70.3 14.3 707.0 -67.0
 
75 Ehire Adrianza (MIN - 1B,3B,SS) 721 49 80 66.5 7.6 735.0 +14.0
 
76 Jose Rondon (CWS - 2B,SS,DH) 1190 56 79 70.8 8.8    
 
77 Esteban Quiroz (SD - SS) MiLB 927 57 77 69.0 8.6    
 
78 Royce Lewis (MIN - SS) MiLB   60 73 66.5 6.5 645.0  
 
79 Andres Gimenez (NYM - SS) MiLB   63 69 66.0 3.0 984.0  
 
80 Jorge Mateo (OAK - SS) MiLB 1312 64 104 89.8 15.4 833.0 -479.0
 
81 Ronny Rodriguez (DET - 2B,3B,SS) 1220 64 83 76.3 8.7 756.0 -464.0
 
82 Ronald Torreyes (MIN - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1297 65 103 83.8 14.2 765.0 -532.0
 
83 Greg Garcia (SD - 2B,3B,SS) 1254 66 87 79.0 9.3    
 
84 Drew Jackson (BAL - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1181 67 77 71.3 4.2 866.0 -315.0
 
85 Kelby Tomlinson (ARI - 2B,SS) NRI 1202 68 87 78.5 6.8    
 
86 Edmundo Sosa (STL - SS) MiLB 1075 70 97 78.3 11.0 1,035.0 -40.0
 
87 Jose Reyes (2B,3B,SS) FA   70 79 74.5 4.5 785.0  
 
88 Isan Diaz (MIA - 2B,SS) MiLB   71 115 93.0 22.0 941.0  
 
89 Sean Rodriguez (PHI - 2B,SS,LF,CF) MiLB 1319 71 110 89.3 14.7 897.0 -422.0
 
90 Ryan Mountcastle (BAL - SS) MiLB   71 93 82.0 11.0 726.0  
 
91 Cristhian Adames (CHC - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB 1185 72 102 81.5 12.0    
 
92 Hanser Alberto (BAL - SS) 1280 72 95 85.0 9.6    
 
93 Yadiel Rivera (MIA - 2B,3B,SS) MiLB   76 105 90.5 14.5    
 
94 Mike Freeman (CLE - SS) 1230 80 85 82.7 2.1    
 
95 Zach Vincej (BAL - SS) MiLB 1216 81 94 85.7 5.9    
 
96 Tzu-Wei Lin (BOS - SS) 1293 82 99 90.0 7.0 787.0 -506.0
 
97 Pete Kozma (DET - 3B,SS) NRI   84 107 95.5 11.5    
 
98 Richard Urena (TOR - SS) 1279 84 94 88.3 4.2    
 
99 Gio Urshela (NYY - 3B,SS) 1309 85 102 93.0 7.0    
 
100 Willi Castro (DET - 2B,SS) MiLB 1263 85 89 87.7 1.9 1,025.0 -238.0
 
101 Gregorio Petit (PHI - 2B,SS) NRI 1317 86 105 95.0 7.8    
 
102 Andrew Velazquez (TB - SS) 1266 86 91 89.0 2.2    
 
103 Pedro Florimon (PHI - SS) MiLB 1324 88 111 98.7 9.5    
 
104 Sergio Alcantara (DET - SS) MiLB 1331 92 114 101.7 9.2    
 
105 Eric Stamets (CLE - SS) MiLB 1326 96 112 102.0 7.1 1,001.0 -325.0
 
106 Eric Sogard (TOR - 2B,SS) 1320 96 109 102.0 5.4    
 
107 Domingo Leyba (ARI - SS) MiLB   101 106 103.5 2.5    
 
108 Yu Chang (CLE - SS) MiLB   104 113 108.5 4.5 780.0