Scouting Profile: Quarterback DeShone Kizer

by Mike Tagliere | @MikeTagliereNFL | Featured Writer
Apr 20, 2017

Quarterback DeShone Kizer may have seen his draft stock fall when his college head coach came forward saying that he still needs to grow up, both on-and-off the field.

DeShone Kizer, Notre Dame

Height: 6’4″
Weight: 233 lbs.
40-yard dash: 4.83 seconds
Arms: 33 1/8″
Hands: 9 7/8″

As we get closer to the NFL Draft, names are moving all over the draft board. Some up, some down, but one that has been moving down is Notre Dame’s DeShone Kizer. It all began with his former coach Brian Kelly coming forward and stating that Kizer should still be in college, not just on the field, but off the field. Since that time, Albert Breer spoke with an unidentified NFL head coach saying that Kizer has some diva qualities. What he does on the field is what we’re here for, so let’s take a look at what he offers.

Starting with his size, Kizer has one of the better frames for a quarterback in this draft class. Standing 6’4″, he won’t have any issues seeing over his offensive lineman, and on top of that, he’s built like a blocking tight end from the waist-down. His legs look like tree trunks, making him a hard target to tackle, especially for blitzing cornerbacks. He also has very large hands (9 7/8 inches), making the ability to pump-fake appear effortless. There are no concerns about his size.

When watching Kizer drop back to pass, he’s competent, but doesn’t really do anything that stands out as special. However, his approach to the game would benefit those catching passes from him. Kizer is willing to throw the ball up into one-on-one coverage, giving his receiver a shot to come up with it. This isn’t something many elite quarterbacks do, but as a fantasy player, you’ll accept the good with the bad.

He’s able to make all the throws that you’d want him to, but again, nothing special. He has solid arm strength, but often relies on his arm too much, rather than putting his body into his throws, which is why he has so much inconsistency. He also waits a bit too long for plays to develop, waiting until a receiver gets open rather than trying to time their routes. He didn’t have a great cast of wide receivers, but he needs to work on getting the ball out of his hands in a much faster fashion.

The offense that Kizer is coming from is most definitely going to be a lot different than what he’ll do in the NFL. He played in Brian Kelly’s spread offense that also uses a lot of option plays, which propped up Kizer’s rushing totals. While he will be able to scramble and get away from some defenders, Kizer will not be known as a mobile quarterback in the NFL, as he’s too clunky when running. His 40-yard dash time of 4.83 all but solidified what I saw on tape.

In the end, we have a quarterback who is extremely young and inconsistent, which led to him getting benched in the 2016 season. These things don’t often happen to future elite quarterbacks. While Kizer was once considered the position’s top prospect, he’s now looked at as a Day Two type guy. If there was one trait that stood out, I’d be more inclined to believe in him, but nothing stood out as something you can’t find elsewhere.

Potential Landing Spot

Considering I don’t view Kizer as a starter in the NFL right now, his landing spot is going to be difficult to predict, so I’ll go with the team I’d like to see him go to, and that is the Steelers. Ben Roethlisberger has been toying with the notion of retiring, and although I don’t believe it, the Steelers need to prepare for life without the big man. As you’ll read below, Kizer would be an excellent student of Roethlisberger’s because their games are not far off one another.

NFL Comparison

I’m reminded of a young Ben Roethlisberger when watching Kizer, though he lacks the huge arm that Roethlisberger has. They are both big quarterbacks, hard to take down, have the ability to scramble and extend the play (believe it or not, Roethlisberger ran for more than 200 yards early in his career), and neither are afraid to take a hit while trying to get a throw off. Roethlisberger is also known to give his wide receiver a shot in one-on-one situations, similar to what I see in Kizer. This is in no way me saying that Kizer is going to grow up and be Roethlisberger, but it’s me saying that if there’s one quarterback’s game he emulates, it’s Roethlisberger.

To read up on some of the other high-profile NFL Draft prospects, check out the links below:

Mitch Trubisky – (QB, North Carolina)
Deshaun Watson – (QB, Clemson)
Pat Mahomes – (QB, Texas Tech)
Leonard Fournette – (RB, LSU)
Joe Mixon – (RB, Oklahoma)
Christian McCaffrey – (RB, Stanford)
Dalvin Cook – (RB, Florida State)
Corey Davis – (WR, Western Michigan)
Mike Williams – (WR, Clemson)
John Ross – (WR, Washington)


Subscribe: iTunesStitcher | SoundCloud | Google PlayTuneInRSS

Mike Tagliere is a featured writer at FantasyPros. For more from Mike, check out his archive and follow him @MikeTagliereNFL.

 


What's your take? Leave a comment

Fantasy Games
FanDuel photo
Play for your share of $1m+
for FREE with first deposit
DRAFT photo
Play fantasy drafts for cash with a money back guarantee
CBS Sports photo
Serious Fantasy Football
Get our Mobile App!

Enter your phone number below, and we'll text you a link to download the app.

1Le'Veon Bell (PIT)RB
2Todd Gurley (LAR)RB
3Mark Ingram (NO)RB
4LeSean McCoy (BUF)RB
5Kareem Hunt (KC)RB
6Melvin Gordon (LAC)RB
7Alvin Kamara (NO)RB
8Leonard Fournette (JAC)RB
9Antonio Brown (PIT)WR
10Julio Jones (ATL)WR
 View all Flex Rankings 
11A.J. Green (CIN)WR
12Rob Gronkowski (NE)TE
13Carlos Hyde (SF)RB
14Jordan Howard (CHI)RB
15DeMarco Murray (TEN)RB
16Doug Baldwin (SEA)WR
17Travis Kelce (KC)TE
18Christian McCaffrey (CAR)RB
19Brandin Cooks (NE)WR
20Mike Evans (TB)WR
21Lamar Miller (HOU)RB
22Jay Ajayi (PHI)RB
23Adam Thielen (MIN)WR
24Zach Ertz (PHI)TE
25Tevin Coleman (ATL)RB
26Samaje Perine (WAS)RB
27Dion Lewis (NE)RB
28Michael Thomas (NO)WR
29DeAndre Hopkins (HOU)WR
30Keenan Allen (LAC)WR
1Jose Altuve (HOU)2B
2Paul Goldschmidt (ARI)1B
3Nolan Arenado (COL)3B
4Mike Trout (LAA)CF,DH
5Mookie Betts (BOS)RF
6Charlie Blackmon (COL)CF
7Max Scherzer (WSH)SP
8Joey Votto (CIN)1B
9Kris Bryant (CHC)1B,3B
10Chris Sale (BOS)SP
 View All Rankings 
11Manny Machado (BAL)3B,SS
12Anthony Rizzo (CHC)1B,2B
13Corey Seager (LAD)SS
14Giancarlo Stanton (MIA)RF
15Clayton Kershaw (LAD)SP
16Corey Kluber (CLE)SP
17Daniel Murphy (WSH)1B,2B
18Nelson Cruz (SEA)RF,DH
19George Springer (HOU)CF,RF
20Freddie Freeman (ATL)1B,3B
21Francisco Lindor (CLE)SS
22Edwin Encarnacion (CLE)1B,DH
23Josh Donaldson (TOR)3B,DH
24Yu Darvish (FA)SP
25Robinson Cano (SEA)2B
26Bryce Harper (WSH)RF
27Miguel Cabrera (DET)1B,DH
28J.D. Martinez (FA)RF
29Madison Bumgarner (SF)SP
30Jose Abreu (CWS)1B,DH
1Kevin Durant (GSW)SF,PF
2Giannis Antetokounmpo (MIL)SF,PF
3James Harden (HOU)PG,SG
4Stephen Curry (GSW)PG,SG
5Russell Westbrook (OKC)PG
6Karl-Anthony Towns (MIN)C
7Anthony Davis (NOR)PF,C
8Kawhi Leonard (SAS)SG,SF
9LeBron James (CLE)SF,PF
10Nikola Jokic (DEN)PF,C
 View All Rankings 
11John Wall (WAS)PG
12DeMarcus Cousins (NOR)PF,C
13Chris Paul (HOU)PG
14Damian Lillard (POR)PG
15Jimmy Butler (MIN)SG,SF
16Rudy Gobert (UTH)C
17Kyrie Irving (BOS)PG,SG
18Hassan Whiteside (MIA)C,PF
19Myles Turner (IND)PF,C
20Paul George (OKC)SF,PF
21Kyle Lowry (TOR)PG
22Draymond Green (GSW)SF,PF
23Kristaps Porzingis (NYK)PF,C
24Kemba Walker (CHA)PG
25CJ McCollum (POR)PG,SG
26Mike Conley (MEM)PG
27Bradley Beal (WAS)SG
28Klay Thompson (GSW)SG,SF
29Marc Gasol (MEM)C
30Kevin Love (CLE)PF,C