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2021 NFL Draft Profile: WR Dyami Brown

by Kyle Yates | @KyleYNFL | Featured Writer
Apr 20, 2021

While the NFL is consistently moving towards valuing speed more than anything else at the WR position, there’s something to be said for the ability to make big plays downfield. When evaluating the 2021 WR class, it’s hard to find a player that makes more big-time plays downfield than Dyami Brown.

Brown consistently showed out during his college career at North Carolina in a loaded offense. He’s averaged over 20 yards per reception each of the past two seasons and was constantly showing up on highlight reels.

Is Brown the next great WR to enter the NFL with this big play ability? Or does he have a bit more to work on to become a refined receiving threat at the next level?

These questions are answered here in our scouting profile on Dyami Brown:

Check out the rest of our 2021 NFL Draft prospect profiles >>

Dyami Brown (WR – North Carolina)

Vital Statistics

Height: 6-foot-1
Weight: 189 lbs.
Arms: 32 3/4
Hands: 9 5/8
40-Yard Dash: 4.46
Vertical Jump: 38
Broad Jump: 128
Bench: 18 Reps
Short Shuttle: 4.35
3-Cone Drill: 6.87

College Statistics

Check out Dyami Brown’s detailed college stats here >>

Skills Legend

80+ Generational Talent
79 Top-10 Skill
78 First-Round Skill
77 Second-Round Skill
76 Third-Round Skill
75 Fourth-Round Skill
74 Fifth-Round Skill
73 Sixth-Round Skill
72 Seventh-Round Skill
71- UDFA

Skills Chart

Skills Breakdown (out of 100)

Route Running (74)Brown’s a solid WR prospect that wins vertically more often than not. He’s not a refined route-runner, but he adds enough nuance to his routes that it’s enough to freeze CFB DBs on downfield routes. He’ll add a head nod or jab his foot into the ground at the top of his break, which is just enough for him to freeze the DB and blow past them. It’s unclear whether or not that will routinely work against NFL DBs, though. However, he lacks twitch or refinement in his underneath routes and is often rounding out his routes. This will be enough for NFL corners to get in and make a play on the ball.

Athleticism/Agility (73.5)Does well when he has momentum on his side but lacks overall top-end burst or agility. He will be asked to stretch the field due to his skill set and ability to track the ball while it’s in the air, but he might not have the overall speed measurables that NFL teams will want.

Hands (74)Questionable receiving ability underneath, especially in tight windows. Tends to get spooked and also relies on body catches from time to time. Several drops on tape when trying to reel in throws in short to intermediate levels, but shows great receiving ability downfield.

Contested Catch Ability (74.5)As mentioned, he tends to get spooked and drop passes when he feels pressure in his face. Didn’t shield off defenders well, especially against Syracuse, and allowed defenders to get their hands in on the pass. However, able to reel in tough catches downfield easily with a defender trailing him.

Run After Catch Ability (73): Able to pull away from defenders downfield after the catch when he has momentum built up, but he won’t be able to pull away from defenders after the catch in the short passing game. Just simply doesn’t have the burst or agility to succeed in this area.

Release (74.5)Good understanding of utilizing rocker steps and getting the defender on their heels in press. Never faced truly aggressive press coverage on the tape I watched but had a good understanding of how to create space and separation at the line on the tape that I watched. He might not succeed against NFL DBs that are faster and shiftier than him at the LOS but showed good technique.

Deep Ball Tracking (77)Excellent at tracking the ball deep downfield and locating the football while it’s in the air. Able to slow his momentum enough to put himself in a position to make a play on the ball.

Speed (75): As mentioned, good speed when he’s able to build up momentum and ran a respectable 4.46 40-yard dash at his pro day.

Video Evaluation


They Said It

Joe Marino on Dyami Brown: "Because he's such a good vertical receiver, it opens up a world of possibilities for him to snap off routes and get open in the intermediate areas of the field."Mike Tagliere on Dyami Brown: "He doesn't have a ton of speed to take the top off the defense, though his route running will create separation downfield at times. His biggest question mark might be his hands, as I saw a few drops on film."

Projected Draft Range

After a dominant showing at his Pro Day, we likely see Brown go off the board in the second round of the 2021 NFL Draft.

Ideal Fantasy Landing Spot

If the Bengals decide to go with an offensive lineman in round one, Brown could be waiting for them at the top of the second. Adding in a deep downfield threat opposite of Tee Higgins to compliment Tyler Boyd out of the slot would be a perfect pairing for fantasy football.

Fantasy Comparison

From a playstyle perspective and how they’ll be utilized in the league, Gabriel Davis and Brown compare nicely. Neither are exactly refined route-runners, but they win with big plays deep downfield.

Check out our complete list of 2021 NFL Draft profiles here >>


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Kyle Yates is a featured writer at FantasyPros. For more from Kyle, check out his archive and follow him @KyleYNFL.