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Fantasy Baseball Player Notes

2022 Fantasy Baseball Draft Notes

Juan Soto Note
Juan Soto photo 2. Juan Soto RF
Ahh, the Juan Soto conundrum. Soto is one of the best hitters in baseball. At 23 years old, he's on a Hall of Fame trajectory. His raw power is astounding. But he plays for the suddenly terrible and powerless Washington Nationals. A few years removed from the World Series, the team is now a collection of "That guy is still playing?" and "Never heard of him" types. Soto's HR numbers will be huge, but his R and RBI numbers will take a big hit.
30 weeks ago
Manny Machado Note
Manny Machado photo 15. Manny Machado 3B,DH
It's a shame you don't get points for defense in fantasy baseball, as that would bolster Machado's falling stock. The former perennial top-10 selection is now going in the late second or early third round. Machado will turn 30 this year, and some positive regression seems to be in order. He's still a five-category contributor, and in a loaded Padres lineup, 80/25/80 with 10 SBs should be on the table. But expecting Machado to return to the 35 HR level would be downright delusional.
30 weeks ago
Fernando Tatis Jr. Note
Fernando Tatis Jr. photo 63. Fernando Tatis Jr. SS,CF,RF
A fractured wrist has changed the draft calculus on Tatis Jr., who might be out for as long as three months. It's always taken an iron stomach to draft him and deal with the injury risk. When healthy, he's a multi-category box score stuffer. His counting numbers are so orbital, he's basically a seven-category player ... when he's on the field. Now, you simply can't consider taking him within the first seven rounds.
28 weeks ago
Josh Bell Note
Josh Bell photo 75. Josh Bell 1B,DH,LF
Bell had a horrid .464 OPS in April, likely because his timing was off after missing time because of a COVID-19 diagnosis. But once he found his footing, he was everything that Nationals hoped he would be. He batted .277 with an .887 OPS in the second half, and even played plenty of outfield so Washington could keep his bat in the lineup even with Ryan Zimmerman playing well. His walk percentage and strikeout rate largely returned to their pre-2020 levels, and he got better and better as the season went along. With Zimmerman now retired and the DH in the National League, Bell's bat should remain in the lineup nearly every day, and the presence of Juan Soto and Nelson Cruz should offer him plenty of RBI opportunities. He's not a fantasy superstar, but he's a capable starter at first base for your fantasy team.
28 weeks ago
Jake Cronenworth Note
Jake Cronenworth photo 78. Jake Cronenworth 1B,2B,SS
Cronenworth quietly had a very solid season for the Padres, totaling 21 home runs and exactly an .800 OPS. He's not an exciting player - he doesn't have a ton of power or speed and his batting average won't wow you. But he'll bat second for the Padres this year and so you can expect him to challenge the 94 runs scored he totaled last season. He also struck out just 14% of the time last year, which ranked in the top 10% in MLB, so he's unlikely to endure prolonged slumps, and consistent production goes further in today's fantasy landscape than it used to. Add to that his multi-position eligibility and Cronenworth makes an ideal part of any fantasy team, particularly one with daily lineup changes.
28 weeks ago
Trent Grisham Note
Trent Grisham photo 82. Trent Grisham CF
Grisham was . . . fine last year. His 15 homers and 13 steals contributed, particularly given that he missed time with injury. But there just wasn't much to get excited about. There's probably more to be had in the stolen base department, as Grisham ranks in the 91st percentile in sprint speed. And he should bat atop the lineup this year with Fernando Tatis set to miss time. But your best-case scenario is a 20-15 line with a batting average that hurts. That's a startable player in fantasy, but not one you should reach for in drafts.
28 weeks ago
Wil Myers Note
Wil Myers photo 150. Wil Myers 1B,LF,RF
Myers couldn't sustain the many gains he made in the shortened 2020 season, but he didn't fall off a cliff entirely. His .256 batting average was his best (other than 2020) since 2016, and he offered 25 combined home runs and steals. The thing is that Myers' strikeout rate rose to 28.2%, but that's a number he can live with if he continued to make the quality of contact we're used to seeing from him. But, he didn't. His hard hit rate and exit velocity fell off a cliff (his 29.8% hard contact rate was one of the worst in baseball). It would seem like an odd decline for Myers, who was just 30 last year, so it may have just been a blip. But, it's worth being cautious before you head into the season assuming he'll bounce back. Given his ADP, however, you won't need to have confidence in him for him to be worth drafting.
26 weeks ago
Ha-Seong Kim Note
Ha-Seong Kim photo 228. Ha-Seong Kim 2B,3B,SS
Austin Nola Note
Austin Nola photo 239. Austin Nola C
Jorge Alfaro Note
Jorge Alfaro photo 246. Jorge Alfaro C,DH,LF
Jurickson Profar Note
Jurickson Profar photo 272. Jurickson Profar 1B,2B,CF,DH,LF,RF
Luis Campusano Note
Luis Campusano photo 403. Luis Campusano C
Webster Rivas Note
Webster Rivas photo 483. Webster Rivas C
Brandon Drury Note
Brandon Drury photo 620. Brandon Drury 1B,2B,3B,DH,LF,RF
Eguy Rosario Note
Eguy Rosario photo 637. Eguy Rosario SS
Jorge Ona Note
Jorge Ona photo 673. Jorge Ona LF,RF
Domingo Leyba Note
Domingo Leyba photo 713. Domingo Leyba 2B,3B
Luis Liberato Note
Luis Liberato photo 722. Luis Liberato CF
Brett Sullivan Note
Brett Sullivan photo 729. Brett Sullivan C,LF