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Dynasty Rookie Draft Outlook & Advice: Day 2 Picks (2024 Fantasy Football)

Dynasty Rookie Draft Outlook & Advice: Day 2 Picks (2024 Fantasy Football)

This is what we’ve been waiting for, fantasy football enthusiasts. The NFL Draft is under way, and we finally get to see where the rookie prospects are going to launch their professional careers. And NFL Draft landing spots allow us to start to zero in on fantasy football and dynasty rookie draft pick values.

Throughout the draft, we’ll take a closer look at fantasy-relevant prospects, giving you an overview of their strengths and weaknesses, and assessing their fantasy value in both redraft and dynasty formats.

Let’s dig into Day 2 picks and their fantasy football draft outlook.

2024 Dynasty Fantasy Football Guide

Fantasy Football Rookie Draft Outlook

Here’s what Fitz expects for each of the skill position players selected on Day 2 of the 2024 NFL Draft.

Bills Draft Keon Coleman

The Buffalo Bills have addressed an urgent need at wide receiver, selecting Florida State’s Keon Coleman at the top of the second round.

A king-sized receiver with a knack for making acrobatic catches, Coleman uses his 6-3, 213-pound frame well, boxing out defenders, making contested catches and using his big wingspan to haul in balls thrown outside the frame of his body. Coleman has a basketball background — he played for Tom Izzo’s hoops program at Michigan State before transferring to FSU — and it shows. Coleman is an above-the-rim football player. He has terrific ball skills and vise-grip hands.

Keon Coleman had 50 catches for 658 yards and 11 touchdowns last year. He had big games against LSU and Clemson early in the season, but his production tailed off sharply later in the season when he was playing through nagging injuries and the Seminoles were playing without injured QB Jordan Travis.

Coleman’s 2022 numbers at Michigan State were good but not great: 58 catches for 798 yards and seven touchdowns. It should be noted, however, that Coleman outproduced Spartan teammate and future Packer Jayden Reed that season, even though Reed was a senior and Coleman was a sophomore.

One of the younger receivers in the draft, Coleman will turn 21 on May 17. His youth suggests he still has ample room for improvement.

Although Coleman is a decent route-runner, he doesn’t consistently get separation from defenders. He’s clocked a sluggish 4.61 at the combine, although he did reach a top speed of over 20 mph while running the gauntlet at the combine — the fastest of any receiver who ran that drill.

Buffalo desperately needed help at wide receiver. They let Gabe Davis walk in free agency and traded Stefon Diggs to the Texans. With Khalil Shakir and Curtis Samuel at the top of the Bills’ WR depth chart, Coleman should have no trouble getting immediate playing time, and he’ll get to work with one of the best quarterbacks in the league in Josh Allen. Bottom line: This is a terrific landing spot for Coleman.

It will be interesting to see whether the Bills use Keon Coleman primarily as an outside X receiver or as a big slot receiver. Coleman certainly has the size to be an X, but the slot may be his true calling.

I’m above consensus on Coleman in dynasty, ranking him WR6 among rookies and WR31 overall. I expect Coleman to be taken in the back half of the first round in 1QB dynasty rookie drafts and in the early second round in superflex rookie drafts — though he could conceivably sneak into the first round of superflex drafts considering how good the landing spot is.

Keon Coleman’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR64 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR53. I have Coleman ranked WR51 for redraft.

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Chargers Draft Ladd McConkey

The Los Angeles Chargers added a badly needed wide receiver, selecting Georgia’s Ladd McConkey with the 34th overall pick of the NFL Draft.

McConkey is a route-running savant. He’s lightning-quick into and out of his route breaks, creating big cushions when he faces man coverage. McConkey clowned the defensive backs he faced in one-on-one drills at the Senior Bowl, eventually prompting those DBs to play well off the line of scrimmage so McConkey wouldn’t embarrass them.

Although he never had more than 58 catches or 762 receiving yards in any of his three seasons at Georgia, McConkey fared well on a per-snap basis. He averaged 3.26 yards per route run last season and caught 80% of his targets. As FantasyPros NFL Draft and college football analyst Thor Nystrom has noted, Georgia ran a 12-personnel, run-heavy offense and often pulled starters early during their frequent blowout victories, tamping down McConkey’s numbers.

McConkey does most of his work in the short and intermediate areas of the field, but with his 4.39 speed, he’s capable of hauling in deep balls. With his speed and quick feet, he’s also dangerous after the catch.

At 5-11½, 186 pounds, McConkey isn’t built to win in contested-catch situations. He dealt with a back injury last season, and his size could make him an injury risk.

Ladd McConkey should have a major opportunity to contribute immediately, since the Chargers had an urgent need at receiver. They traded star Keenan Allen to the Bears and let Mike Williams walk in free agency, leaving Josh Palmer and Quentin Johnston as the top wide receivers on their depth chart. Johnston’s rookie season was an abject disaster, so more help was needed.

Although the Chargers figure to have a run-heavy offense with Jim Harbaugh as their head coach and Greg Roman as their offensive coordinator, McConkey should see a substantial target share right away, and those targets will be coming from Justin Herbert, one of the top young quarterbacks in the league.

The 22-year-old Ladd McConkey is my WR8 among rookies and my WR34 overall in dynasty. He’s likely to be selected somewhere in the back half of the first round in 1QB rookie drafts and early in the second round of superflex rookie drafts.

McConkey had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking of WR70 in half-point PPR formats and an Underdog best-ball ADP of WR59. I have him ranked WR52 for redraft.

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Patriots Draft Ja’Lynn Polk

The New England Patriots have selected the University of Washington’s Ja’Lynn Polk with the 37th overall pick of the NFL Draft, adding some much-needed help to an undermanned WR room.

Polk had a big senior season for Washington in 2023, with 69 catches for 1,159 yards and nine touchdowns in 15 games despite sharing targets with Rome Odunze (who led the FBS in receiving yardage) and Jalen McMillan.

The 6-1, 203-pound Polk has good size and positional versatility, able to line up either inside or outside. He has terrific hands. Polk was charged with only seven drops over his last two seasons with the Huskies. He’s also a fine athlete who posted a Relative Athletic Score of 8.84.

Although Polk posted big numbers in 2023, some of his biggest games came when McMillan was out with an injury. He had four 100-yard performances in games McMillan missed. When McMillan was around, Polk was pretty clearly Washington’s No. 3 receiver. Polk is solid but nothing special as a route-runner and after the catch.

Polk should have a good chance to earn significant playing time right away, as the top wide receivers on the New England depth chart before the draft were Demario Douglas, K.J. Osborn, JuJu Smith-Schuster and Kendrick Bourne. With Douglas spending a lot of time in the slot last year, Polk might take a lot of snaps as an outside receiver in his rookie year.

The Patriots had one of the worst passing attacks in football last year, and while their selection of Drake Maye with the third overall pick in the draft offers hope for improvement, New England is still likely to have one of the least potent passing games in the league in 2024.

In dynasty, I have Polk ranked WR17 among rookies and WR70 overall. I think he’s slightly overrated and would prefer to have fellow University of Washington rookie Jalen McMillan. Expect him to come off the board in the mid-to-late second round or early third round of 1QB rookie drafts, or in the mid-to-late third round of superflex drafts.

Polk’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR81 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR71. I have Polk ranked WR86 for redraft and have little interest in rostering him.

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Panthers Draft Jonathon Brooks

The Carolina Panthers have injected a dose of talent into their backfield, selecting University of Texas RB Jonathon Brooks with the 46th overall pick of the draft.

Perhaps the biggest drawback with Brooks is that he’s coming off a major knee injury. He tore his right ACL against TCU On Nov. 11. Early reports indicate that Brooks will be ready for training camp, though it’s unclear if Brooks will be able to participate in contact drills.

Even if Jonathon Brooks is deemed to be fully healthy, it’s possible the Panthers will exercise an abundance of caution with their new RB in his rookie year, limiting his workload. It’s also possible Brooks won’t be at the height of his powers less than a year removed from knee surgery — which wouldn’t be the first time a running back was at less than 100% immediately upon returning from a torn ACL.

Were it not for the knee injury, Brooks may have been the near-unanimous RB1 in this rookie class. He served a two-year apprenticeship behind star Texas RB Bijan Robinson and primary backup Roschon Johnson, but when Brooks got his chance to start in 2023, he was ready.

Brooks ran for 1,139 yards and 10 touchdowns in 11 games for the Longhorns, averaging 6.1 yards per carry. He added 25 receptions for 286 yards and one touchdown.

The 6-0, 216 pound Brooks is quick-footed and slippery, and his jump cuts can leave defenders grasping at air. Although he may not having blazing straight-line speed, Brooks has impressive acceleration and can dart around like a water bug. Jonathon Brooks demonstrated proficiency as a pass catcher in his 11 games as a starter at Texas, and he has room for growth in that area.

There are few, if any, glaring weaknesses in Brooks’ game. He doesn’t run with a great deal of power, and it’s possible he’ll start the season closer to his college playing weight of 207 pounds rather than his combine weight of 216. With only one year as a college starter, Brooks can’t match the experience of some of the other running backs in the class.

Jonathon Brooks could quickly ascend a Panthers RB depth chart that currently has Chuba Hubbard and Miles Sanders at the top. He’s a better prospect than either Hubbard or Sanders was, and Sanders was considered a major disappointment last season. Carolina is a good landing spot in terms of opportunity, but it’s not the healthiest offensive ecosystem.  The Panthers ranked dead last in offensive yardage last season and tied the Patriots for last in points scored.

Before the draft, Brooks had a FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB51 in half-point PPR redraft leagues, and he had an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB33. I tentatively have him ranked RB38 for redraft.

If Brooks gets a clean bill of health before your fantasy draft, he’s worth something close to his Underdog ADP, which would put him in midrange RB3 territory. Obviously, potential investors will have to carefully monitor his health status in late July and August.

For dynasty, I have Brooks ranked RB23 overall and RB1 in the rookie class. In 1QB rookie drafts, Brooks is likely to go somewhere from the middle of the first round to the early part of the second round. In superflex rookie drafts, it’s possible Brooks will sneak into the back end of the first round, but he’s more likely to go in the early to middle part of the second round.

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Colts Draft Adonai Mitchell

The Indianapolis Colts have added one of the most intriguing wide receivers in the 2024 rookie class, selecting Adonai Mitchell of Texas with the 20th pick of the second round.

Mitchell had 55 catches for 845 yards and 11 touchdowns in 14 games for the Longhorns last season after transferring from Georgia. He’s a size-speed freak, with a 6-2, 205-pound frame and 4.34 wheels, giving Mitchell a 97th percentile speed score, according to PlayerProfiler.com. Mitchell posted a 9.99 Relative Athletic Score, fifth-best among all wide receivers to have posted a RAS since 1987, per RAS pioneer Kent Lee Platte.

Adonai Mitchell’s speed and athleticism give him immense potential. He’s also shown reliable hands, with only one drop over his final two seasons in Austin.

While Mitchell hit some impressive home runs for the Longhorns, he didn’t bang out a lot of singles and doubles. He hasn’t shown much in contested-catch situations, and he hasn’t gained a lot of yardage after the catch. Mitchell’s effort can be inconsistent at times.

The Colts already have a high-volume possession receiver and a quick slot receiver in Josh Downs. What they need is a vertical threat, since Alec Pierce hasn’t been particularly effective in that role. It’s unlikely Adonai Mitchell gets a substantial target share right away as the No. 3 or No. 4 receiver in what should be a fairly run-heavy offense with Anthony Richardson at quarterback and Jonathan Taylor as the lead running back. But Mitchell could be the Colts’ designated lid lifter, providing the occasional big play.

Mitchell figures to be an early-second-round pick in 1QB dynasty rookie drafts and a late second-rounder or early third-rounder in most superflex rookie drafts. I’m relatively bearish on Mitchell in dynasty, ranking him WR10 among the rookies and WR44 overall.

For redraft, Mitchell had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB63 in half-point PPR redraft leagues. Adonai Mitchell’s predraft Underdog best-ball ADP was RB55. I have Mitchell ranked WR68in redraft and won’t be targeting him in my drafts, though I wouldn’t be opposed to taking a late-round flyer on him if he slid.

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Commanders Draft Ben Sinnott

The Washington Commanders have selected Kansas State’s Ben Sinnott with the 21st pick of the second round.

Sinnott became an important component of the K-State passing attack over his final two college seasons. He had 31 catches for 447 yards and four touchdowns in 2022, and 49 catches for 676 yards and six touchdowns in 2023.

Ben Sinnott is a terrific athlete who ran a 4.68 at the combine, recorded a 40-inch vertical jump, and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 9.73. He’s a solid route-runner who isn’t afraid to do the dirty work over the middle of the field, and he’s a beast after the catch. Sinnott broke 14 tackles last season. Sinnott also has reliable hands.

The biggest issue with Sinnott is size. At 6-3½, 250 pounds, he might not be an effective inline blocker at the NFL level, even though he was an effective blocker in college.

The Commanders needed a good young tight end. They added Zach Ertz in free agency, but Ertz is 33 years old and has lost 17 games to injury over the last two years. Washington now has reigning Heisman Trophy winner Jayden Daniels at quarterback, and the Commanders aren’t exactly loaded at wide receiver, with Terry McLaurin the only proven blue chipper at the position.

In dynasty, I have Ben Sinnott ranked TE2 among rookies and TE21 overall. He’s likely to come off the board somewhere in the third round of 1QB rookie drafts and in the fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.

Sinnott’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was TE50 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of TE33. I have Sinnott ranked TE35 for redraft.

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Jets Draft Malachi Corley

The New York Jets have added to their wide receiver corps, selecting Western Kentucky’s Malachi Corley with the first pick of the third round.

Corley is a catch-and-run specialist. At 5-10, 215-pounds, Corley has the thick build of a running back, and he plays like one. As FantasyPros NFL Draft and college football analyst Thor Nystrom has noted, Corley caught 89 passes behind the line of scrimmage over his last two seasons and led the nation in yardage gained on screen passes both years. It’s easy (maybe too easy) to compare Corley to the 49ers’ Deebo Samuel, since both players do their best work after the catch and can do damage with either elusiveness or power. Corley is extremely tough to bring down.

The 22-year-old Corley needs work on his routes, however. He hasn’t shown the ability to consistently do damage as a downfield receiver, and he had a poor contested catch rate (23.5%) last season.

Corley should fit right in as the Jets’ slot receiver in three-WR sets, with Garrett Wilson and free-agent addition Mike Williams on the outside. Wilson is the Jets’ alpha receiver, and Williams will be a key vertical threat. Corley can be QB Aaron Rodgers’ short-area slot receiver. There might be a limited ceiling with that sort of role, but it could give Corley a decent fantasy floor.

In dynasty, I have Corley ranked WR13 among rookies and WR56 overall. Expect him to be selected somewhere in the vicinity of the late second round of 1QB rookie drafts, or in the mid-third round of superflex drafts.

Corley’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR89 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR74. I have Corley ranked WR79 for redraft.

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Cardinals Draft Trey Benson

The Arizona Cardinals have beefed up their backfield by selecting Florida State RB Trey Benson with the second pick of the third round.

Trey Benson has the best size-speed combination of any running back in this class. At the NFL Scouting Combine, he ran the 40-yard dash in 4.39 seconds at 216 pounds, giving him a 98th percentile speed score, according to PlayerProfiler.com.

Over his final two college seasons, Benson ran for 1,896 yards and 23 touchdowns in 26 games, averaging 6.1 yards per carry. He began his college career at Oregon but transferred to FSU after getting only six carries for the Ducks as a redshirt freshman.

Trey Benson is a one-cut runner with admirable footwork. An impressive physical specimen, Benson can be a real problem for defenses when he gets to the second level, with the speed to blow by linebackers and the power to shake off tackle attempts by defensive backs.

Although he wasn’t a prolific pass catcher in college, topping out at 20 receptions for 227 yards last season at Florida State, he has the potential to be a pass-down asset in the NFL. He has good hands, is a willing and able pass blocker, and as FantasyPros college football and NFL Draft analyst Thor Nystrom has noted, Benson showed the ability to adjust to a ball in the air during his college career.

Benson has an upright running style that invites unnecessary punishment and can make him easier to tackle than he should be. Although Benson has the build to be a three-down workhorse, he never filled that role in college, averaging 11.9 carries per game during his two seasons with the Seminoles.

Although Benson stayed healthy in 2022 and 2023, it’s worth noting that he sustained a major knee injury when he was at Oregon, tearing his right ACL, MCL, lateral meniscus, medial meniscus and hamstring.

After taking WR Marvin Harrison Jr. with the fourth overall pick of the draft, the Cardinals elected to add more offensive firepower in the second round with Benson. It’s a logical addition. Their top running back, James Conner, turns 29 the first week of May and has had injury issues in the past. The other running backs on the roster — Michael Carter, Emari Demercado and DeeJay Dallas — are role players. Benson can ease Conner’s burden, and the rookie won’t be asked to shoulder a huge workload right away after getting modest usage at Florida State.

But from a fantasy perspective … not great, Bob. A Conner-Benson platoon limits the value of both, and it’s hard to envision either of them going in the first five rounds in redraft leagues.

Benson’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking in half-point PPR redraft leagues was RB40, and he had an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB37. I tentatively have Benson ranked RB36, with Conner at RB28.

In dynasty, I have Benson ranked RB3 among rookies, RB31 overall. In 1QB rookie drafts, Benson figures to go somewhere from the late first round to the early part of the second round. In superflex drafts, Benson will probably go in the middle to late second round.

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Bengals Draft Jermaine Burton

The Cincinnati Bengals have selected Alabama’s Jermaine Burton with the 16th pick of the third round.

Burton led Alabama in receiving yards in each of the last two seasons, with 40 catches for 677 yards and seven touchdowns in 2022, and 39 catches for 798 yards and eight touchdowns in 2023. Over his four-year college career that also included a two-year stint at Georgia, Burton averaged 18.0 yards per catch and scored touchdowns on 17.4% of his receptions.

The 6-0, 196-pound Jermaine Burton ran a 4.45 at the combine and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 9.54. He’s a dangerous downfield threat who had an average depth of target of 20.2 yards last season. His speed and athleticism show up on the field, helping him create separation. Burton also has ultra-reliable hands, with zero drops in 2023 and only four drops in four collegiate seasons.

There are character concerns with Burton, who reportedly wasn’t on the draft boards of several NFL teams. He’s not always consistent with his route-running or his effort. Burton also has a lean build that could hurt him in contested-catch situations at the next level.

Let’s face it: Cincinnati is not an optimal landing spot for a rookie receiver. The Bengals have one of the best wide receivers in the NFL, Ja’Marr Chase. They also have one of the best No. 2 receivers in the league, Tee Higgins. Cincinnati also has an intriguing pair of young receivers in Andrei Iosivas and Charlie Jones. It could be hard for Burton to get on the field as a rookie. But if the Bengals were to trade Tee Higgins, as has been speculated for some time, Burton’s fantasy outlook would brighten.

In dynasty, I have Burton ranked WR14 among rookies and WR60 overall. He’s likely to come off the board in the mid-to-late second round of 1QB rookie drafts, or in the early-to-mid third round of superflex drafts.

Burton’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR113 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR91. I consider Burton to be a longer-term play only and have him ranked WR100 for redraft.

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Rams Draft Blake Corum

The Los Angeles Rams are adding some national championship pedigree to their RB room, selecting Michigan’s Blake Corum with the83rd overall pick of the draft.

Corum was Michigan’s lead running back last season, fueling the Wolverines’ 15-0 season with 1,245 rushing yards and 28 touchdowns. Corum was also a prolific producer in 2022, with 1,463 rushing yards and 19 touchdowns.

Corum isn’t especially big (5-7½, 205 pounds) or fast (4.53), but he might be the best pure runner in this RB class. He has excellent vision, good acceleration and lateral agility, and the sort of exceptional contact balance you might expect from a back with such a compact build.

Despite his smaller stature, Corum was a workhorse for Michigan, averaging 18.7 carries per game over the last two years. His 59 touchdowns over the last three years suggest that Corum has a nose for the end zone.

Although Corum carried a heavy load for Michigan, he isn’t likely to see anything close to that sort of usage with the Rams, who already have Kyren Williams on the roster. Corum wasn’t a prolific pass catcher in college and might not see a lot of action on passing downs. Perhaps the biggest concern with Corum from a fantasy standpoint is that a lack of size and speed could limit his ceiling.

It will be interesting to see how Rams head coach Sean McVay deploys his running backs this year. Williams was one of the most heavily worked running backs in the league last season. averaging 21.7 touches a game during the regular season. Williams is only 5-9 and weighs less than 200 pounds, so it makes sense to lighten his load.

Corum will probably have a limited role as a rookie, barring injury. But he’ll be an important handcuff, since he could have a valuable role if anything were to happen to Williams.

I’m fond of the ultra-productive Corum and have him ranked RB3 in this rookie class. My overall dynasty ranking for Corum is RB32. In superflex rookie drafts, Corum will probably be selected somewhere in the third round. In 1QB rookie drafts, he’ll probably go somewhere in the back half of the second round.

For redraft, Corum had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB44 in half-point PPR redraft leagues. Corum’s predraft Underdog best-ball ADP was RB41. I’m tentatively ranking him RB41 in redraft.

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Steelers Draft Roman Wilson

WR Roman Wilson of Michigan will be joining the Pittsburgh Steelers, who selected Wilson with the 84th overall pick of the draft.

It’s a good landing spot for Wilson. More on that in a moment.

The 22-year-old Wilson supplied the Wolverines with 48 catches for 789 yards and 12 touchdowns last year as a key cog in Michigan’s national championship season. He’s an athletic slot receiver who ran a 4.39 at the NFL Scouting Combine and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 8.59.

Roman Wilson is lightning-quick and will occasionally blow by defenders to make big plays downfield. He’s extremely sure-handed, with two drops and zero fumbles last season. Wilson never had more than two drops in any of his four years in Ann Arbor.

The 5-10½, 185-pound Wilson has suboptimal size and playing strength, and he has short arms. And while Wilson has the speed to be dangerous after the catch, he isn’t going to break many tackles.

The Steelers needed help at wide receiver after trading Diontae Johnson to the Panthers. Young WR George Pickens has flashed star potential for the Steelers, but Pickens has been inconsistent and could use a reliable sidekick. The other receivers on the Steelers’ roster are unexciting: Van Jefferson, Calvin Austin III and Quez Watkins.

Wilson could conceivably start for Pittsburgh right away. He might be second or third in the target pecking order behind Pickens and perhaps TE Pat Freiermuth — not a bad situation from a fantasy perspective. And with the Steelers adding QBs Russell Wilson and Justin Fields in the offseason, their passing game should be vastly improved. One word of caution, however: Offensive coordinator Arthur Smith’s usage of his skill players can be unpredictable and frustrating.

In dynasty, I have Wilson ranked WR11 among rookies and WR51 overall. He’s likely to go in the early-to-mid second round of 1QB rookie drafts or in the late second round of superflex drafts.

Wilson’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR83 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR66. I have Wilson ranked WR65 for redraft.

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Packers Draft MarShawn Lloyd

The Green Bay Packers have selected MarShawn Lloyd with the 88th pick of the NFL Draft.

A lot of NFL Draft and fantasy analysts regard Lloyd as a boom-or-bust RB prospect, with some attributes that could conceivably make him a star, and some attributes that could potentially short-circuit his professional career.

MarShawn Lloyd has a tantalizing combination of speed and power. He carries 220 pounds on a 5-8½-inch frame and ran a 4.46 at the combine, giving him a 93rd percentile speed score, according to PlayerProfiler.com. Lloyd has big-play speed and can break ankles with his sharp cuts. He runs with attitude and determination, fighting for extra yards and occasionally rattling the chinstraps of defenders. His compact frame helps him power through arm tackles.

The 23-year-old Lloyd averaged 7.1 yards per carry in his final college season, with nine rushing touchdowns on 116 carries.

One of the concerns with Lloyd is that he has a sparse résumé. He never had more than 116 carries in any of his collegiate seasons, and he averaged just 10.5 carries per game for USC last season. Lloyd doesn’t have much experience as a pass blocker or pass catcher either, with 34 receptions in his three years of college football. Lloyd also has some concerning ball-security issues, with five fumbles over the last two years.

In his first year with the Packers, Lloyd figures to be used lightly. The Packers signed Josh Jacobs in the offseason and will probably use him in something close to a workhorse capacity, and they re-signed A.J. Dillon to be Jacobs’ primary backup. Lloyd might have to serve a one-year apprenticeship before he gets any meaningful playing time.

In dynasty, I have MarShawn Lloyd ranked RB5 among the rookies and RB33 overall. In 1QB rookie drafts, Lloyd is likely to come off the board in the middle to latter part of the second round. In superflex rookie drafts, he’s likely to be selected in the top half of the third round.

Lloyd’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking in half-point PPR redraft leagues was RB59. Lloyd’s Underdog best-ball ADP before the draft was RB54. Since he could be buried on Green Bay’s RB depth chart in Year 1, I can rank Lloyd no higher than RB63 for redraft.

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Buccaneers Draft Jalen McMillan

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have selected Jalen McMillan of Washington with the 92nd pick of the NFL Draft.

In 2022, McMillan had 79 catches for 1,098 yards and nine touchdowns. He had more receptions and more touchdowns for the Huskies that year than Rome Odunze, whom the Bears just drafted ninth overall. McMillan’s production tailed off sharply in 2023 — 45 catches for 559 yards and five touchdowns — but a sprained MCL forced him to miss four games and clearly hindered him in several others.

The 6-1, 197-pound McMillan is a good-sized slot receiver who excels against zone coverage, finding openings in coverage and making himself available to his quarterback. With 4.47 speed, he’s capable of making plays downfield. McMillan is good at tracking the ball and has reliable hands.

McMillan hasn’t been particularly effective in contested-catch situations, and he isn’t especially good after the catch. McMillan dealt with numerous injuries in college. In addition to last year’s MCL sprain, he dealt with a high-ankle sprain in 2020 and a hand injury in 2021.

At best, McMillan would be the Buccaneers’ No. 3 receiver behind Mike Evans and Chris Godwin. McMillan’s primary competition for playing time figures to be Trey Palmer, who had 39 catches for 385 yards and three touchdowns last year as a rookie. The Buccaneers used Godwin in the slot on about 32% of his snaps last season, so there’s an opportunity for McMillan to get a healthy dose of slot snaps.

In dynasty, I have McMillan ranked WR16 among rookies and WR69 overall. He’s likely to come off the board in the late second round or early third round of 1QB rookie drafts, and in the mid-to-late third round of superflex drafts.

McMillan’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR94 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR97. I’m relatively bullish on McMillan, slotting him in at WR85 for redraft.

Check out his full dynasty rookie draft profile partner-arrow


Commanders Draft Luke McCaffrey

The Washington Commanders have selected Luke McCaffrey of Rice with the final pick of the third round.

The brother of 49ers RB Christian McCaffrey and the don of former Broncos WR Ed McCaffrey, Luke McCaffrey certainly has good bloodlines. But the youngest McCaffrey’s path to the NFL was a circuitous one.

Her launched his college career as a quarterback at Nebraska and played sparingly there before transferring to Rice. He was a quarterback in his first year at Rice but them=n switched to wide receiver. McCaffrey had 58 catches for 723 yards and six touchdowns in 2022, then took things to another level in 2023 with 71 catches for 992 yards and 13 touchdowns in 2023.

The 6-1½, 198-pound McCaffrey is a fine athlete who posted a Relative Athletic Score of 9.44. He has excellent hands, with only three drops on 120 targets last year. McCaffrey also excels in contested catch situations.

McCaffrey has only been playing wide receiver for two years, so he’s a work in progress. He’ll need to refine his route-running to compete against the top competition he’ll be facing in the NFL.

McCaffrey lands in a pretty good spot in Washington. He’ll be behind Terry McLaurin and Jahan Dotson on the depth chart, but he should be able to pass Dyami Brown and Olamide Zaccheaus on the depth chart,

For dynasty, I have McCaffrey ranked WR19 among the rookies and WR88 overall. Admittedly, the fact that McCaffrey squeezed into Day 2 of the draft has me rethinking those rankings. I may have to move him up.

In redraft, I tentatively have McCaffrey ranked WR97.

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Dynasty Rookie Draft Rankings

Our analysts provide their latest rookie draft rankings below. And also check out our expert consensus dynasty rookie draft rankings!

More Dynasty Rookie Draft Advice


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Fantasy Football Wide Receiver & Running Back ADP Battles (2024)

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