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Dynasty Rookie Draft Outlook & Advice: Day 3 Picks (2024 Fantasy Football)

Dynasty Rookie Draft Outlook & Advice: Day 3 Picks (2024 Fantasy Football)

This is what we’ve been waiting for, fantasy football enthusiasts. The NFL Draft is under way, and we finally get to see where the rookie prospects are going to launch their professional careers. And NFL Draft landing spots allow us to start to zero in on fantasy football and dynasty rookie draft pick values.

Throughout the draft, we’ll take a closer look at fantasy-relevant prospects, giving you an overview of their strengths and weaknesses, and assessing their fantasy value in both redraft and dynasty formats.

Let’s dig into notable Day 3 picks and their fantasy football draft outlook.

2024 Dynasty Fantasy Football Guide

Fantasy Football Rookie Draft Outlook

Here’s what Fitz expects for notable skill position players selected on Day 3 of the 2024 NFL Draft.

Panthers Draft Ja’Tavion Sanders

The Carolina Panthers have addressed a need at tight end by taking Ja’Tavion Sanders of Texas with the first pick of the fourth round.

Sanders topped 600 receiving yards in each of his last two college seasons with the Longhorns, catching 54 passes for 613 yards and five touchdowns in 2022, and catching 45 passes for 682 yards and two touchdowns in 2023. He averaged 15.2 yards per catch in 2023 — an impressive number for a tight end.

Sanders has 4.69 speed, giving him appealing potential on seam routes. He’s good after the catch, and he has a terrific pair of hands. Sanders wasn’t charged with a single drop in 2023. He just turned 21, so there may still be some untapped potential here.

The 6-3½, 245 Sanders has suboptimal size for an NFL tight end, and he was able to do only eight reps on the bench press at his combine. It’s unlikely he’ll see much in-line work due to his lack of size and strength, and that could keep him off the field.

Sanders could start right away since the top tight end on the Carolina depth chart at the moment is Tommy Tremble. It’s possible that Sanders could earn enough talents to become fantasy-relevant right away, though it might be unwise to get too aggressive drafting Sanders, since the Panthers had the fewest passing yards in the league last season

In dynasty, I have Sanders ranked TE2 among rookies and TE21 overall. He’s likely to come off the board somewhere in the latter part of the third round of 1QB rookie drafts and in the fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.

Sanders’ predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was TE26 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of TE29. I have Wilson ranked TE29 for redraft.

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Broncos Draft Troy Franklin

The Denver Broncos finally stopped the unexpected draft slide of Oregon WR Troy Franklin, trading up to take him with the second pick of the fourth round.

Franklin was a big-play machine for the Ducks. After breaking out with 61 catches for 891 yards and nine touchdowns as a junior in 2022, Franklin went nuclear in 2023, with 81 catches for 1,383 yards and 14 touchdowns in 13 games. He averaged an impressive 3.32 yards per route run last season.

The 6-1½, 176-pound Franklin ran a 4.41 at the combine, and his speed shows up on tape. He’s good at tracking the ball and makes some impressive leaping catches — not surprising for a prospect who has a 39-inch vertical jump. Franklin is also a surprisingly good tackle-breaker after the catch for a slender receiver.

The big question with Franklin is how he’ll hold up in the NFL with his rail-thin frame. He has questionable playing strength, which could make him easy to jam at the line of scrimmage. Franklin was charged with nine drops last season.

The Broncos needed to add firepower at the position. Their top three receivers entering the draft: Courtland Sutton, Marvin Mims and Josh Reynolds. Sutton is seeking a new contract and recently skipped voluntary team workouts. Mims is still unproven. Reynolds is basically just a depth piece. There’s immediate opportunity for Franklin to step in and play a significant, fantasy-relevant role for Denver.

As a bonus, Franklin is joining his quarterback of the last two years, Bo Nix, whom the Broncos selected with the 12th overall pick of the draft. Chemistry between Nix and Franklin shouldn’t be an issue.

For dynasty, I have Franklin ranked WR15 among rookies, WR68 overall. Expect him to come off the board late in the second round in 1QB rookie drafts, and in the mid-to-late third round in superflex rookie drafts.

For redraft, Franklin had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB73 in half-point PPR redraft leagues. Franklin’s predraft Underdog best-ball ADP was RB44. I’m closer to ECR, clotting in Franklin as my WR72 for redraft leagues.

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Giants Draft Theo Johnson

The New York Giants have selected Theo Johnson of Penn State with the seventh pick of the fourth round.

Johnson put on a show at the NFL Scouting Combine, clocking a 4.57 in the 40-yard dash at 6-6, 259 pounds. He also had a 39 ½-inch vertical jump and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 9.93, ninth-best of 1,141 tight ends to have recorded a RAS since 1987, according to RAS pioneer Kent Lee Platte. The 23-year-old Johnson has nearly ideal size for an NFL tight end, and his athleticism gives him immense potential.

Despite that dreamy combination of size and athleticism, Johnson’s college numbers were pedestrian. He topped out at 34 catches for 341 yards and seven touchdowns in 13 games last year. He hasn’t shown much as a route-runner, and he’s not a particularly effective blocker.

Giants TE Darren Waller is reportedly contemplating retirement. If Waller does indeed decide to call it quits, Johnson could help tag-team the TE position for the Giants along with third-year man Daniel Bellinger. It would be overly aggressive to project Johnson as a starter, and it’s hard to see him being fantasy-relevant as a rookie in light of his modest statistical output at Penn State.

In dynasty, I have Johnson ranked TE6 among rookies and TE30 overall. He’s likely to come off the board somewhere in the latter part of the third round of 1QB rookie drafts and in the fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.

Johnson’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was TE51 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of TE38. I have Johnson ranked TE47 for redraft.

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Patriots Draft Javon Baker

The New England Patriots have drafted Javon Baker of UCF with the 10th pick of the fourth round.

Baker had two strong seasons for UCF to close out his college career after being roadblocked at Alabama as a freshman and sophomore. He had 56 catches for 796 yards and five touchdowns in 2022, then exploded for 52 catches, 1,139 yards and seven touchdowns in 2023, averaging 21.9 yards per catch with an average depth of target of 17.1 yards. Baker was a ruthlessly effective downfield weapon.

The 6-1, 202-pound Baker has good size and isn’t afraid to use it. He’s a physical receiver who comes down with more than his fair share of contested catches and isn’t afraid to mix it up with physical cornerbacks. Baker has good contact balances, making him dangerous after the catch.

Baker doesn’t have exceptional timed speed (4.54), and his route-running could use some polish. He’s also somewhat drop-prone, with 14 drops over his two seasons at UCF.

Baker can almost be too competitive at times, like when he drew an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty for blowing a kiss at the Oklahoma sideline during an 86-yard touchdown catch against the Sooners. But Baker was terrific that day, with five catches for 134 yards and two touchdowns.

Baker joins fellow rookie Ja’Lynn Polk, a third-round selection, in a revamped Patriots WR room. Polk and Baker should both have an immediate opportunity to climb a sparse WR depth chart that includes Demario Douglas, K.J. Osborn, JuJu Smith-Schuster and Kendrick Bourne. But the New England passing game could be among the least productive in the league this year as the Pats break in a new quarterback, rookie Drake Maye, the No. 3 overall pick.

In dynasty, I have Baker ranked WR17 among rookies and WR65 overall. Expect him to come off the board in the late second round or early third round of 1QB rookie drafts, or in the mid-to-late third round of superflex drafts.

Baker’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR127 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR87. I have Baker ranked WR80 for redraft.

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Ravens Draft Devontez Walker

The Baltimore Ravens have selected North Carolina’s Devontez “Tez” Walker with the 13th pick of the fourth round.

Walker transferred from Kent State to North Carolina after catching 58 passes for 921 yards and 11 touchdowns for KSU in 2022. Walker wasn’t immediately eligible at North Carolina and only played eight games for the Tar Heels last year, but he was productive when he finally got on the field, with 41 catches for 699 yards and seven touchdowns.

The 6-1½, 193-pound Walker is an intriguing vertical receiver with 4.36 speed, a 40½-inch vertical jump and a 9.87 Relative Athletic Score. In addition to possessing dangerous speed, Walker is good at tracking the ball, he can elevate to make tough contested catches, and he seems to have a knack for working the boundary à la former Green Bay Packer Jordy Nelson.

Walker is still raw, having run a limited route tree in college. He’s played only 28 games of FBS football, and he played only eight of those games for a Power 5 team. He’s more of a developmental prospect than a ready-made NFL receiver.

Although Walker is a raw developmental prospect, he could potentially ascend the Ravens’ WR depth chart quickly. Walker’s game should complement that of No. 1 WR Zay Flowers nicely, and the other receivers at the top of the depth chart are Rashod Bateman and Nelson Agholor, who aren’t exactly stars.

In dynasty, I have Walker ranked WR19 among rookies and WR76 overall. He’s likely to come off the board in the early-to-mid third round of 1QB rookie drafts, and in the late third round or early fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.

Walker’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR88 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of 81. Given that Walker is a raw developmental prospect, I have little interest in him for redraft in 2024 and have him ranked WR101.

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Bengals Draft Erick All

The Cincinnati Bengals have selected Iowa’s Erick All with the 15th pick of the fourth round.

This is an exciting fit for one of the more intriguing tight ends in this year’s rookie class. More on team fit in a moment.

All has a worrisome medical history. His 2022 season ended after only three games because of a back injury. He tore his ACL last October and wasn’t able to work out at the combine or the Iowa pro day.

But All has flashed immense potential as a pass catcher. As a sophomore at the University of Michigan in 2021, All had 38 catches for 437 yards and two touchdowns. In seven games at Iowa last season, he had 21 catches for 299 yards and two touchdowns in one of the worst offenses in FBS. He’s a good athlete with reliable hands, and he’s tough to bring down after the catch.

The Bengals could use a legitimate pass-catching threat at tight end after trying to ham-and-egg it at the position last year with Tanner Hudson, Drew Sample and Irv Smith Jr. Cincinnati added Mike Gesicki in the offseason, but Gesicki has had an up-and-down career that’s mostly been down lately.

If All can earn a substantial snap share, he could quickly become fantasy-relevant in an offense triggered by QB Joe Burrow. With WRs Ja’Marr Chase and Tee Higgins occupying the attention of defensive backs downfield, All should have plenty of room to work underneath.

In dynasty, I have All ranked TE4 among rookies and TE24 overall. He’s likely to come off the board somewhere in the mid-to-late third round of 1QB rookie drafts and in the fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.

All’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was TE76 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of TE50. In other words, he’s completely off the radar. I have All ranked TE39 for redraft.

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Dolphins Draft Jaylen Wright

The Miami Dolphins have added one of the most intriguing running backs in the 2024 draft class to a crowded RB room, selecting Tennessee’s Jaylen Wright with the 20th pick of the fourth round.

Wright is a big-play runner with explosive 4.38 speed. He reached a speed of 22.2 mph on one of his runs last season — the fastest top speed for any college running back in 2024. Wright averaged 7.4 yards per carry in his final college season in Knoxville, carrying 137 times for 1,013 yards. With his explosiveness, Wright is flat-out lethal when he gets into open space. He’s terrific at making cuts without decelerating.

At 5-10½, 210 pounds, Wright is no mere passing-down scatback. He averaged 4.35 yards after contact per attempt last season and ran for 10 or more yards on more than a quarter of his rushing attempts. Although he’s known for big plays in the running game, Wright is a surprisingly proficient pass blocker.

Since Wright is a Tennessee running back with breakaway speed and considerable big-play ability, comparisons to Alvin Kamara are inevitable. And like Kamara, Wright was used somewhat lightly at Tennessee, averaging 11.3 carries and 12.3 touches over his final two college seasons. But Kamara was a much more accomplished college pass catcher than Wright, who had only 24 receptions the last two seasons.

It can be hard to evaluate skill players who come out of Tennessee head coach Josh Heupel’s gimmicky but effective spread offense, and Wright got to run against more than his fair share of light boxes. Wright doesn’t always run with good vision, and he can be too quick to bounce runs outside.

Wright could end up being a victim of the Dolphins’ speed addiction. Miami is an undeniably disappointing landing spot for Wright. The Dolphins got one of the best rookie running backs in last year’s draft class, De’Von Achane, who’s even faster than Wright. The Dolphins also have productive 32-year-old veteran Raheem Mostert and jack-of-all-trades veteran Jeff Wilson. It’s going to be tough for Wright to get on the field as a rookie, and there’s no clear path for Wright to become a lead back in a year or two.

Wright’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking in half-point PPR redraft leagues was RB50, with an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB52. Given the bleak outlook for Wright to earn significant playing time as a rookie, I have him ranked RB60 for redraft

Expect Wright to be a late second-round pick in 1QB dynasty rookie drafts. He’ll come off the board somewhere in the back half of the third round in most superflex rookie drafts. I tentatively have Wright ranked RB7 among rookies, with an overall dynasty ranking of RB42.

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Buccaneers Draft Bucky Irving

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have selected Oregon’s Bucky Irving with the 25th pick of the fourth round. Irving profiles as a passing-down back who doesn’t have the size or speed to be a heavy contributor on early downs.

After launching his college career at the University of Minnesota, Irving transferred to Oregon before his sophomore year. He turned in a pair of 1,000-yard rushing seasons for the Ducks before declaring himself eligible for the draft following his junior year.

While Irving was a productive runner for Oregon, with 17 TD runs and an average of 6.5 yards per carry over the last two seasons, it’s his pass-catching ability that stands out. Irving had 87 receptions over the last two years, and he had 56 receptions for 413 yards and two touchdowns in his final college season.

The 5-9, 192-pound Irving is quick and slippery, with a bagful of moves and above-average contact balance. He has reliable hands and can be a weapon in the passing game because of how well he operates in space.

Irving’s small frame will probably prevent him from being an effective inside runner in the NFL. He’s going to have to make his living as a passing-down back for the Buccaneers, and while Irving is a fine pass catcher, he’s a poor pass blocker. As shifty as Irving is, he doesn’t have great speed. At the combine, he clocked a 4.55 at 192, giving him a 27th percentile speed score, according to PlayerProfiler.com.

It’s hard to envision Irving getting substantial playing time as a rookie since Bucs RB Rachaad White is a good pass-catcher who served as a true three-down workhorse last season. On the bright side, the middle of the fourth round is satisfying draft capital for Irving, whom some analysts projected to fall into the fifth round or beyond because of his disappointing 40-yard dash at the combine.

For dynasty, I have Irving ranked RB11 in this class and RB49 overall. His pass-catching ability makes him rosterable in all dynasty leagues, but his lack of size and athleticism limit his top-end potential.

For redraft, Irving had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB68 in half-point PPR redraft leagues and an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB47.

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Eagles Draft Will Shipley

The Philadelphia Eagles have selected Will Shipley of Clemson with the 27th pick of the fourth round.

The 5-11, 206-pound Shipley is a fine athlete who ran a 4.45 at his pro day and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 9.58. He’s an accomplished pass catcher who had 69 receptions in his final two seasons at Clemson.

Shipley had 1,182 rushing yards and 15 touchdowns as a sophomore in 2022, but his third and final season with the Tigers was a bit of a letdown, as he finished with 827 rushing yards and seven touchdowns in 12 games and ceded carries to teammate Phil Mafah.

A resourceful runner who leverages his above-average athleticism, Shipley should be a lock for a roster spot thanks to his pass-catching ability and versatility. But Shipley’s NFL potential could be limited. He’s not exceptional in any area, and while he’s a capable pass catcher, he’s a liability as a pass blocker.

Philadelphia isn’t an ideal landing spot for Shipley from a fantasy perspective. The Eagles added Saquon Barkley in the offseason and presumably will give him a heavy workload. The Eagles also have the very capable Kenneth Gainwell as a backup. Shipley isn’t likely to see much action as a rookie, barring injury.

For redraft, Irving had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB75 in half-point PPR redraft leagues and an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB62.

For dynasty, I have Irving ranked RB9 in this class and RB48 overall.

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Bills Draft Ray Davis

The Buffalo Bills have selected Re’Mahn “Ray” Davis with the 28th pick of the fourth round.

Davis had a five-year college career that took him from Temple to Vanderbilt to Kentucky, so he’s a somewhat overaged prospect who’ll turn 25 in November. He capped off his college carer with a fine 2023 season for Kentucky, rushing for 1,129 yards and 14 touchdowns, with 33 receptions for 323 yards and seven touchdowns.

The 5-8, 211-pound Davis is a tough, hard-nosed runner with good vision and quick feet that keep pumping through contact. He’s dangerous on cutbacks, using his lateral agility to find open space. Davis has also displayed utility as a pass catcher with 62 receptions and 10 TD catches over his final two college seasons.

Davis clocked a 4.52 at the combine, so he isn’t especially fast for a smaller back. He can also be too much of an east-west runner at times. While Davis is a capable pass catcher, questions about his pass blocking could keep him off the field on obvious passing downs.

Buffalo is a nice landing spot for Davis. He’s not going to leapfrog lead RB James Cook early on, but Cook is a smaller back who could use a tag-team partner in the backfield. The Bills had an amalgam of veteran backups behind Cook last year, including Latavius Murray, who’s now 34. I think it’s fair to say Davis has the inside track on the No. 2 job.

I have Davis ranked RB6 among the rookie RB prospects and RB40 in my overall dynasty rankings.

For redraft, Davis had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB70 in half-point PPR redraft leagues and an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB54. He’s a good value at those rummage-sale prices.

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49ers Draft Isaac Guerendo

The San Francisco 49ers have selected RB Isaac Guerendo of Louisville with the 29th pick of the fourth round.

Guerendo grabbed the attention of fantasy managers and hardcore football fans when he clocked a 4.33 at the NFL Scouting Combine at 6-0, 221 pounds. A remarkable athletic specimen, Guerendo posted a Relative Athletic Score of 9.97, one of the five best RAS numbers recorded by a running back since 1987.

As amazing as Guerendo’s testing numbers are, his college resume is light. He spent four years at Wisconsin, where he was buried on the depth chart, first behind Jonathan Taylor, then behind Braelon Allen. He spent his final college season at Louisville, where he shared work and had 132 carries for 810 yards and 11 touchdowns, along with 22 catches for 234 yards.

Unfortunately, there doesn’t appear to be much of a path to fantasy relevance for Guerendo in his rookie year, with Christian McCaffrey entrenched as the 49ers’ do-everything lead back and Elijah Mitchell as CMC’s backup. But Guerendo is still an intriguing longer-term play in dynasty leagues.

I have Guerendo ranked RB13 among rookies, with an overall dynasty ranking of RB67.

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Jets Draft Braelon Allen

The New York Jets have added the most imposing physical specimen among this year’s rookie running backs, drafting Wisconsin’s Braelon Allen with the 134th overall pick.

Allen measured 6-1, 235 pounds at the NFL Scouting Combine but probably played at closer to 240-245 pounds during his college career. He chose not to run the 40-yard dash at either the combine or his pro day, but Allen’s game really isn’t about straight-line speed anyway.

As a 17-year-old freshman, Allen ran for 1,268 yards and 12 touchdowns. He had another 1,200-yard season as a sophomore, scoring 11 touchdowns. Allen’s third and final season at Wisconsin was a mild letdown: He finished with 984 rushing yards and 12 touchdowns in 11 games.

Allen might not be fast, but he has quick feet and good lateral agility for a big man. And while he’s not as punishing a runner as he could be at his size, Allen isn’t going to be brought down by an arm tackle either.

It’s worth underscoring how productive Allen was at a young age, pounding out a 1,200-yard rushing season for a Big Ten team at an age when most kids are finishing up high school. Allen is the youngest player in this draft class at any position, and yet he had more 100-yard rushing games in college (20) than any other player in this class.

As noted earlier, Allen isn’t ultra-physical for a bigger back. He’s an upright runner, which leads to hard shots that occasionally force Allen to leave the game. He had some ball-security issues in college, coughing up nine fumbles during his three seasons in Madison. And while Allen has decent hands, he’s probably not going to get much usage as a pass catcher in the NFL since he’s not particularly effective in space.

It’s hard to imagine Allen getting significant playing time as a rookie behind Breece Hall, one of the best running backs in the league. It’s not even clear whether Allen will be Hall’s primary backup, since the Jets also have intriguing young RB Israel Abanikanda, a fifth-round pick last year.

Allen’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking in half-point PPR redraft leagues was RB51, with an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB46. I tentatively have Allen ranked RB66 for redraft. He’ll likely be an afterthought in redraft leagues this year.

I now have Allen ranked RB9 among rookies, with an overall dynasty ranking of RB48. Allen could eventually have some fantasy utility as an early-down thumper whose big body gives him appealing goal-line potential. But the majority of dynasty leagues are full-point PPR, and Allen’s limited ceiling as a pass catcher might put a tight lid on his dynasty value.

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49ers Draft Jacob Cowing

The San Francisco 49ers have selected WR Jacob Cowing of Arizona with the final pick of the fourth round.

Cowing is a speedy overachiever who was productive throughout his college career at Arizona, with 316 catches for 4,477 yards and 33 touchdowns. He had a career-high 13 touchdowns last season but averaged a career-low 9.4 yards per catch, largely because of the arrival of stud WR Tetairoa McMillan, who became the Wildcats’ primary downfield receiver.

Speed is Cowing’s calling card. He ran a 4.38 at the NFL Scouting Combine, and his speed shows up on tape. Cowing has some seriously quick feet.

At 5-8, 165 pounds, Cowing is tiny by NFL standards. As productive as he was in college, Cowing’s size could limit him to slot duty in the NFL, and it’s possible he’ll be used strictly as a punt returner.

It seems highly unlikely that Cowing will have any fantasy utility as a rookie. The 49ers already have Deebo Samuel and Brandon Aiyuk at wide receiver, and they spent a late-first-round draft pick on University of Florida WR Ricky Pearsall. They also have one of the better pass-catching tight ends in the league in George Kittle. If the 49ers were to trade Aiyuk — a possibility that has been widely speculated — Cowing would at least have a narrow path to fantasy relevance.

For dynasty, I have Cowing ranked WR21 among the rookies, WR90 overall. He’s outside the top 100 at wide receiver in my redraft rankings.

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Broncos Draft Audric Estime

The Denver Broncos have added a rugged thumper to their RB room, selecting Notre Dame’s Audric Estime with the 12th pick of the fifth round.

The 5-11, 222-pount Estime is a no-frills power back who churned out 1,341 rushing yards and 18 touchdowns in 12 games during his final season with the Fighting Irish. Estime is a punishing inside runner who has some lateral agility and doesn’t go down easily. His hard-charging style makes him a natural candidate for goal-line duty, giving him some TD upside.

At the combine, Estime clocked a plodding 4.71 in the 40-yard dash, and a 4.61 at his pro day was only a marginal improvement. Estime recorded only 26 receptions during his three college seasons in South Bend, so he probably isn’t going to play much on passing downs.

In short, what you see is what you get with Estime. He’s an early-down hammer whose goal-line potential could make him a useful fantasy asset, but his limited skill set limits his ceiling.

The good news is that the Bengals have an unsettled RB depth chart following the trade that sent longtime Cincinnati lead back Joe Mixon to Houston. Veteran Zack Moss and second-year man Chase Brown sit atop the Bengals’ RB depth chart, but neither has a stranglehold on a large role.

Estime had a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB66 in half-point PPR redraft leagues and an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB49. I tentatively have him ranked RB58 in redraft.

For dynasty, I have Estime ranked RB11 among the rookie running backs, with an overall dynasty ADP of RB49.

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TEAM Draft Spencer Rattler

The New Orleans have selected Spencer Rattler with the 150th overall pick of the NFL Draft, making Rattler an intriguing prospect in superflex dynasty rookie drafts.

Rattler had a circuitous five-year college career that took him from Oklahoma to South Carolina and exposed him to very different offensive systems. He had an impressive first season as a college starter in 2020, throwing for 3,031 yards and 28 touchdowns in 11 starts. But in 2021, Oklahoma head coach Lincoln Riley benched Rattler in favor of a hotshot five-star recruit named Caleb Williams.

Rattler transferred to South Carolina and initially struggled behind the Gamecocks’ shaky offensive line. But Rattler caught fire in his final three starts of 2022, throwing for 1,044 yards and 10 touchdowns against Tennessee, Clemson and Notre Dame. In his final college season, he threw for 3,188 yards in 12 games, with 19 touchdowns and a 68.9% completion percentage.

The 23-year-old Rattler is an aggressive playmaker with a live arm and some mobility. Rattler improved his stock during the predraft process with a great week at the Senior Bowl and a nice showing at the NFL Scouting Combine. He performed well in both events and also left a good impression in interviews — an important component for Rattler, whose maturity has been questioned at times.

At 6-0, 211 pounds, Rattler lacks prototypical QB size. FantasyPros college football and NFL Draft analyst lists Jeff Blake as a player comparison for Rattler — not an unflattering comp. Rattler can be hyper-aggressive at times, which could lead to an elevated turnover rate when he faces NFL defenses.

On one hand, it’s not encouraging that Rattler fell into the middle of the fifth round after being viewed by some as a likely Day 2 pick. On the other hand, Rattler landed on a team that’s not exactly rock-solid at quarterback. Veteran Derek Carr had an uneven season in his first year with the Saints and heard from the boobirds in some of the Saints’ home games. Rattler could potentially be Carr’s successor.

For dynasty, I have Rattler ranked QB7 among the rookies, QB36 overall. He’ll be an afterthought in 2024 redraft leagues.

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Giants Draft Tyrone Tracy

The New York Giants have selected Purdue’s Tyrone Tracy with the 31st pick of the fifth round.

Tracy spent the first four years of his college career as a lightly used wide receiver at the University of Iowa before transferring to Purdue and becoming a running back. He had 716 rushing yards and eight touchdowns for the downtrodden Boilermakers last year, averaging 6.3 yards per carry behind a weak offensive line. He also had 19 catches for 132 yards.

An extraordinary athlete, the 5-11, 209-pound Tracy ran a 4.48 at the combine and recorded a 40-inch vertical jump. His 9.84 Relative Athletic Score was second-best among the running backs in this class behind only Louisville’s Isaac Guerendo and 30th best of the 1,765 RBs to have posted a RAS since 1987, according to RAS pioneer Kent Lee Platte.

Although he’s relatively inexperienced as a running back, Tracy displayed good vision and instincts last year to go along with his natural burst and agility. He posted a 163.5 elusive rating last season and averaged 4.44 yards after contact per attempt. And as a former wide receiver, Tracy clearly has NFL pass-catching potential. FantasyPros NFL Draft and college football analyst Thor Nystrom is a Tracy enthusiast, ranking him fifth among the running backs in this class.

Positional inexperience is probably the biggest knock on Tracy, who faces a steep learning curve in the NFL. He’s also an older prospect who’ll turn 25 in November.

Tracy landed in a pretty good spot. Devin Singletary sits atop the Giants’ RB depth chart, with Matt Breida and Eric Gray behind him. It’s easy to imagine Tracy opening the 2024 season as the Giants’ primary passing-down back, and he might be able to contend for early-down work as well.

For dynasty, I have Tracy ranked RB12 among the rookies, RB58 overall.  For redraft, I have Tracy ranked RB65 as of now.

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Chargers Draft Kimani Vidal

The Los Angeles Chargers waited quite a while in this year’s draft to address their sparse RB position, but they finally took one in the sixth round, selecting Kimani Vidal of Troy with the 181st overall pick. It might seem silly for fantasy managers to get excited about a sixth-round draft pick, but the marriage between Vidal and the Chargers seems perfect.

The 5-7½, 213-pound Vidal is a compact and productive runner who became Troy’s all-time leading rusher last year. After rushing for 1,132 yards and 10 touchdowns as a junior, Vidal went nuclear in his senior season, with 1,661 rushing yards, 201 receiving yards and 15 touchdowns in 14 games.

Vidal ran a surprisingly fast 4.46 at the combine and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 8.81. He’s built low to the ground and packs surprising power, using his leg drive to push piles. The shifty Vidal does a nice job of picking his way through traffic, and he saw a lot of it in his last two seasons at Troy, as opposing defenses loaded up the box in an effort to stop the Trojans’ top offensive weapon.

With 315 touches last season, Vidal demonstrated that he can handle bell-cow usage. He’s also a useful pass catcher who had 92 receptions during his four-year college career and impressed onlookers at Senior Bowl practices with his route-running.

The only real knocks on Vidal are that he’s not a burner in the speed department, and he’ll have to make a significant adjustment making the jump from Troy to the NFL.

The Chargers needed some help at running back. They have Gus Edwards and J.K. Dobbins on the roster, but Edwards is strictly an early-down/goal-line hammer, and Dobbins has endured a torn ACL and torn Achilles in recent years. Vidal has a chance to play a substantial role for the Chargers immediately.

Vidal is a favorite dynasty target of mine. I have him ranked RB7 among the rookies and RB37 overall. Despite the poor hit rate for sixth-round draft picks, I’m hoping to grab him in either the late second round or early third round of 1QB rookie drafts, or in the late third round of superflex rookie drafts.

Vidal was an afterthought in the predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Rankings, checking in at RB101. He has an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB78. I’m tentatively slotting him in at RB52 for redraft

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Dolphins Draft Malik Washington

The Miami Dolphins have selected Malik Washington of Virginia with the 184th overall pick of the NFL Draft.

Washington went nuclear at Virginia last season after four unremarkable seasons at Northwestern. He had 110 catches for 1,426 yards and nine touchdowns in 12 games for the Cavaliers. Washington is a springy athlete who ran a 4.47 at the NFL Scouting Combine and posted a Relative Athletic Score of 8.88. The 5-8½, 191-pound Washington is a surprisingly hard to bring down. He broke 35 tackles at Virginia last season, five more than the second-most prolific tackle breaker in this WR class, Malik Nabers. Washington’s quickness and acceleration make him a tough cover for slot corners.

Washington is a somewhat overaged prospect who’ll turn 24 in October, and he was a one-year wonder in terms of production (though in fairness, the Northwestern offense was a sinkhole while Washington was in Evanston). He’s a small, short-armed receiver who figures to be used exclusively in the slot.

There wouldn’t appear to be much of an opportunity for Washington to become fantasy-relevant in 2024, since the Dolphins’ WR duo of Tyreek Hill and Jaylen Waddle is one of the NFL’s best. But Washington could win Miami’s No. 3 receiver job as a rookie, at which point he’d be one injury away from fantasy utility. Hill is on record as saying he intends to retire after the 2025 season.

In dynasty, I have Washington ranked WR18 among rookies and WR74 overall. Expect him to come off the board in the late second round or early third round of 1QB rookie drafts, or in the late third round or early fourth round of superflex drafts.

Washington’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR123 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR82. I have Washington ranked WR87 for redraft.

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Eagles Draft Johnny Wilson

The Philadelphia Eagles have selected Johnny Wilson of Florida State with the 185th overall pick of the NFL Draft.

Wilson is the biggest wide receiver in this draft class, measuring 6-6, 231 pounds. He’s a massive target with a huge catch radius. Wilson isn’t slow either. He clocked a 4.52 at the combine, which at his weight gives him a 98th percentile speed score.

The 23-year-old Wilson was an effective downfield target at Florida State, with an average depth of target of 14.4 yards during his college career. He averaged 2.52 yards per route run during his time with the Seminoles, so he was an efficient performer. Wilson is also a strong blocker, which should help keep him on the field.

Wilson has had issues with drops, and he hasn’t always been as effective in contested-catch situations as his size would suggest. And while Wilson has good timed speed, he’s not going to blow past NFL defensive backs very often.

Philadelphia doesn’t appear to be a great landing spot for Wilson. The Eagles have a terrific pair of wide receivers with A.J. Brown and DeVonta Smith, and the team recently gave huge contract extensions to both. Philadelphia also added DeVante Parker and Parris Campbell in the offseason for depth.

But Wilson is a fascinating developmental prospect, and he might have one potential shortcut to fantasy-relevance.

The possibility that Wilson could be moved to tight end at some point in his career is intriguing. It’s not a move Wilson is eager to make, as he told media members at the combine. But if he eventually consented to a position change, his fantasy value could soar because of the lower pass-catching standards at the position. A 700-yard wide receiver isn’t particularly valuable, but a 700-yard tight end has considerable value.

In dynasty, I have Wilson ranked WR19 among rookies and WR75 overall. He’s likely to come off the board in the early-to-mid third round of 1QB rookie drafts, and in the late third round or early fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.

Wilson’s predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus ranking was WR125 in half-point PPR formats, and he had a predraft Underdog best-ball ADP of WR98. I have Wilson ranked WR104 for redraft.

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Raiders Draft Dylan Laube

The Las Vegas Raiders have selected small-school RB prospect Dylan Laube with the 208th overall pick of the NFL Draft.

A lightly regarded prospect in high school, Laube really came on late in his college career at New Hampshire. He redshirted as a freshman in 2018, and his team played only one game in 2020 due to the pandemic. After playing a part time role in 2021, Laube broke through in 2022 with 1,205 rushing yards, 405 receiving yards and 17 touchdowns. His rushing productivity slipped a bit in 2023 (749 yards), but Laube scored 16 touchdowns and was a prolific pass catcher, with 68 receptions for 699 yards in 10 games.

Laube is more than just a dump-off option out of the backfield. He’s a fluid, nuanced receiver who runs good routes and can do damage downfield. The 5-9½, 206-pound Laube is too undersized to be a regular contributor on early downs. Laube had some fumbling issues in college, and it will be a major adjustment to go from an FCS program to the NFL. Laube is also an older prospect who will turn 25 in December.

It’s not ideal that Laube wasn’t drafted until the latter part of the sixth round. But Laube wound up in a pretty good spot. The relatively unproven Zamir White sits atop the Raiders’ RB depth chart, and White profiles as an early-down back only. The Raiders also have Alexander Mattison as a backup, but Laube has a reasonable chance to become the Raiders’ primary passing-down back.

I have Laube ranked RB14 in my dynasty rookie rankings, with an overall dynasty ranking of RB68. His pass-catching ability could give him instant utility in dynasty leagues, although Laube may never be anything more than a third-down back.

Laube has an Underdog best-ball ADP of RB70, and I think he’s a good value at that price. With a predraft FantasyPros Expert Consensus Ranking of RB99 in half-point PPR redraft leagues, Laube wasn’t on many rankers’ radars before the draft.

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Dynasty Rookie Draft Rankings

Our analysts provide their latest rookie draft rankings below. And also check out our expert consensus dynasty rookie draft rankings!

More Dynasty Rookie Draft Advice


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