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The Primer: Week 3 Edition (2021 Fantasy Football)

Sep 23, 2021
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Washington Football Team vs Buffalo Bills

Date/Time: Sunday September 26, 1:00pm ET
BettingPros Consensus Spread: Bills -8.5
BettingPros Consensus Over/Under: 46 points
Implied Vegas point totals
: Bills 27.25, Washington 18.75

Quarterbacks

Taylor Heinicke: Stakeholders in the Washington offense had to be relieved by Heinicke’s performance in his second career start. After his first few drives sputtered against the Giants last Thursday night, the 28-year-old settled in and started dealing. His bottom-line numbers (336 passing yards, two touchdowns) were pumped up by a couple of hurry-up drives and 46 pass attempts. Still, it was good to see Heinicke float the value of Terry McLaurin and some of Washington’s peripheral pass catchers. This week could be more challenging. The Bills’ pass rush hounded Ben Roethlisberger in Week 1, broke Tua Tagovailoa‘s ribs in Week 2, and pressured Miami backup Jacoby Brissett on more than half of his dropbacks, according to PFF. The Buffalo defense has eight sacks in two games and has limited opposing quarterbacks to a 56.6% completion percentage and a miserly 4.9 yards per pass attempt. Heinicke clicked with Terry McLaurin last week, but McLaurin will be going up against stud cornerback Tre’Davious White. After looking good in Week 2, Heinicke could struggle in the hostile environs of Buffalo in Week 3.

Josh Allen: He currently ranks QB18 in fantasy scoring, and many of his investors are understandably frustrated about having paid a New York strip price for what thus far has been hamburger. But Allen faced a tough Pittsburgh defense in Week 1, and Buffalo’s Week 2 blowout of Miami tamped down Allen’s passing volume. The big days are coming, although Week 3 doesn’t look like a great spot for Allen either. Washington’s defensive numbers against the pass are only average so far, but this is a defense that can really get after the quarterback, with Chase Young, Montez Sweat, and Jonathan Allen bringing the heat. But you don’t fade Josh Allen because of a bad matchup – especially not at home. A year ago, he faced a tough Rams defense at home in Week 3 and he threw for 311 yards and four touchdowns, adding a TD run.

Running Backs

Antonio Gibson and J.D. McKissic: In Week 1, McKissic was a nonfactor, logging one carry and one target. He was much more involved in Week 2, catching 5 of 6 targets for 83 yards and rushing four times for 10 yards and a touchdown. Washington used the hurry-up offense at the end of the first half and again at the end of the game, which kept McKissic on the field and Gibson on the bench (much to the chagrin of Gibson investors). After producing 108 yards from scrimmage in Week 1, Gibson was held to 73 yards in Week 2. Not a total disaster, but he’ll have better days. McKissic’s usage, meanwhile, is going to be a wild card throughout the season. We can’t predict when and how often the Football Team will run a 2-minute offense. Washington head coach Ron Rivera and offensive coordinator Scott Turner seem to recognize that putting the ball in Gibson’s hands is a +EV move, so McKissic isn’t likely to match the 80 receptions he had last season. The Buffalo defense the two Washington backs will face Sunday stymied Steelers rookie Najee Harris in Week 1 and then completely took away the Miami running game in a Week 2 blowout. Consider Gibson a low-end RB1/high-end RB2 this week. His DraftKings price of $5,900 is very reasonable, and Gibson is talented enough to be a worthwhile play despite the daunting matchup.

Devin Singletary and Zack Moss: After being inactive in Week 1, Moss suited up in week two and scored a pair of touchdowns. But Singletary still out-snapped Moss 43-18, and both Moss touchdowns came in the fourth quarter of a 35-0 win. Singletary had a 46-yard touchdown run on the Bills’ first possession but didn’t do much damage otherwise. For now, it still seems like Singletary has the clear lead in this backfield, and it’s still hard to trust him in your lineup because the Bills would rather throw than run, and Josh Allen vultures rushing touchdowns. Even with the two TDs last week, Moss remains an afterthought for now.

Wide Receivers

Terry McLaurin: Targeted only four times in Week 1, McLaurin was the apple of Taylor Heinicke‘s eye in Week 2, drawing 14 targets against the Giants covering 109 air yards. The concern this week is the possibility of shadow coverage from Tre’Davious White, one of the NFL’s finest cover men. But McLaurin had 107 yards and a TD last week despite going up against high-quality Giants cover man James Bradbury. I’m fading Scary Terry in DFS, but he should remain in starting lineups in redraft leagues.

Dyami Brown: The rookie’s usage so far is encouraging, even if the raw numbers don’t show it. Through two games, Brown has four catches for 32 yards. But he’s played 90% of Washington’s offensive snaps and has drawn 10 targets. His average depth of target is 12.6 yards, and Brown has lethal speed, so it’s only a matter of time before he pops a couple of big plays. At some point, Brown is going to become a waiver wire darling. Book it.

Stefon Diggs: He’s currently WR29 in half-point PPR scoring, but we’re not worrying about Diggs. He had 13 targets in Week 1, and he surely would have had more than eight targets in Week 2 if the Bills hadn’t cakewalked their way to a 35-0 win. Diggs’ 258 air yards indicate that things are just fine here, thank you very much. Washington CBs Kendall Fuller and William Jackson aren’t bad, but if the Bills can get Diggs into the coverage of rookie Benjamin St-Juste, Stef will destroy the poor kid. At $7,600 on DraftKings, Diggs comes $700 cheaper than Tyreek Hill and $600 cheaper than Davante Adams. I don’t mind taking him as my anchor receiver and banking the savings.

Cole Beasley: Josh Allen peppered Beasley with 13 targets in the opener, but Beaz was targeted only four times in the Week 2 blowout of the Dolphins and finished with just 36 yards. He’ll draw coverage from respectable veteran slot corner Kendall Fuller this week. Consider Beasley to be a mid-range WR4 in half-point PPR leagues, with a slight bump in full-point PPR.

Emmanuel Sanders: Here’s something unusual: Sanders’ average depth of target through two games is 17.4 yards. For sake of comparison, Manny’s aDOT in New Orleans last year was 8.8 yards. A 34-year-old receiver as a deep specialist? Move over, DeSean Jackson, you’ve got company. With the deeper aDOT, Sanders has caught less than half of his targets so far (6 of 14), and the weird usage profile makes him hard to trust.

Gabriel Davis: We love the kid’s talent, but he’s a fourth wheel at the moment. The production is going to be hit-and-miss, with more miss than hit. He had a touchdown in Week 1 but wasn’t targeted in Buffalo’s easy 35-0 win over Miami in Week 2. It would probably take at least one injury to another Buffalo receiver to make Davis fantasy-relevant in 2021.

Tight Ends

Logan Thomas: The overall numbers through two games are just OK (8-75-1 on 10 targets), but Thomas has played 100% of Washington’s offensive snaps and has run more routes than Travis Kelce. The number of routes run certainly isn’t a perfect barometer for fantasy success – targets from Patrick Mahomes are more valuable than targets from Ryan Fitzpatrick and Taylor Heinicke – but the outlook for Thomas is bright.

Dawson Knox: As a young, athletic tight end in a prolific passing game, Knox is the sort of player who could come on quickly. It’s a good sign that he’s playing a healthy number of snaps (68%) and getting a handful of targets every week. Give it time.

Indianapolis Colts vs Tennessee Titans

Date/Time: Sunday September 26, 1:00pm ET
BettingPros Consensus Spread: Titans -5.5
BettingPros Consensus Over/Under: 44 points
Implied Vegas point totals
: Titans 26.75, Colts 21.25

Quarterbacks

Jacob Eason: With Carson Wentz sidelined with a right high-ankle sprain and a left low-ankle sprain, Eason will make his first NFL start. He’ll be facing a Titans pass defense that ranks bottom five in a host of categories (passing yards, TD passes, yards per attempt, opponent passer rating). But let’s add a dash or perspective: The Titans have faced Kyler Murray and Russell Wilson in their first two contests. Eason has little in common with those two smaller, faster, much better quarterbacks. A fourth-round pick in 2020, Eason stands 6-6 and has a rocket for an arm. But can he read NFL defenses? Can he maintain his composure in the face of a heavy pass rush? We’ll see. He completed 2 of 5 passes for 25 yards in relief of Wentz last week and was intercepted by Rams CB Jalen Ramsey after making an ill-advised throw. I suspect the Titans’ defensive stats will look a little better after this game. 

Ryan Tannehill: The Titans’ offense looked dysfunctional against the Cardinals in Week 1 and began Week 2 with a three-and-out against the Seahawks. Then things started to click. The Titans produced 33 points, 33 first downs, and 532 yards (with 342 of them coming in the second half) in Seattle, and Tannehill looked comfortable again. We know that play action is Tannehill’s bread and butter. In Week 1, the Titans used play-action only five times. In Week 2, they used it on 14 dropbacks, according to PFF, and on those plays, Tannehill went 9 for 12 for 162 yards, with all three of the incompletions drops by his intended receivers. With his mojo seemingly back, Tannehill prepares to face a Colts defense that’s been shredded by Russell Wilson and Matthew Stafford the first two weeks. The Colts have given up six TD passes and are yielding 10.0 yards per pass attempt. Since joining the Titans in 2019, Tannehill has made three starts against the Colts, averaging just 183.3 passing yards per game, with four TD passes and no interceptions. He profiles as a high-end QB2 this week.

Running Backs

Jonathan Taylor and Nyheim Hines: On the Colts’ first drive last week, Taylor had a nice 13-yard run that put the Colts on the Rams’ 1-yard line. He was then stuffed on three straight runs, and the Rams sacked Carson Wentz on 4th-and-goal at the 1 to take possession. It’s been that kind of a start to the season for Taylor. He has a league-high 12 carries inside the red zone and a league-high six carries inside the 5-yard line but still hasn’t scored a touchdown. It’s an unexpected drought for a running back who scored 11 touchdowns as a rookie in 2020 and had 50 TD runs in three college seasons at Wisconsin. Taylor was held to 51 rushing yards last week and 56 rushing yards in the Colts’ opener against Seattle. He’s averaging 3.3 yards per carry. Taylor is too good to stay down for long, but with the untested Jacob Eason at quarterback for the Colts on Sunday, the Titans might take liberties in bringing an extra defender into the box to stop the run. There are two narratives you could try on for size about whether Eason’s presence helps or harms the outlook for Hines. On one hand, an inexperienced, immobile quarterback might be inclined to repeatedly check down to his running backs. On the other hand, Eason probably isn’t going to engineer a lot of long, sustained drives or help the Colts post a big point total, so Hines’s touchdown outlook is dimmed a bit and so is his potential for a healthy number of touches. Taylor has to start for you in redraft, of course. It might be a good week to keep Hines on the bench if you can. And I’m fading both guys in DFS.

Derrick Henry: The Titans’ offense was so well-designed in 2019 and 2020 that it seemed like the departure of offensive coordinator Arthur Smith couldn’t possibly be a good thing for Henry. But after two games with new offensive coordinator Todd Downing, Henry not only leads the NFL in rushing with 240 yards, he also has nine catches for 74 yards. Henry is currently tied with Julio Jones for the team lead in receptions and has two more catches than A.J. Brown. (Hat tip to my friend Alex Dunlap of RosterWatch, who argued convincingly on my podcast two years ago that Henry actually has very good hands and receiving ability.) This whole pass-catching development is crazy. If the receiving production sticks, Henry could have the sort of fantasy impact LaDainian Tomlinson and Marshall Faulk had in their heyday. No, Henry won’t ever be THAT prolific a pass catcher. But add some receiving value to a guy who’s won the NFL rushing title two years running, and now you’re cooking with gas. At $8,600, Henry is the second most expensive player in DraftKings games this week behind only Christian McCaffrey.

Wide Receivers

Michael Pittman: It’s unfortunate that just when Pittman started to click with Carson Wentz in their second game together, Wentz got hurt and will now miss at least one game, maybe more. Pittman had eight catches for 123 yards against the Rams last week, the best game of his NFL career to date. Not only will Pittman be working with a backup quarterback, but he also figures to be taking most of his snaps against second-year Titans CB Kristian Fulton, who did a terrific job of Keeping Seattle’s D.K. Metcalf in check last week. Pittman falls into the WR4 range for me, and it’s probably a good week to keep him on your bench. 

Zach Pascal: With another TD catch against the Rams in Week 2, Pascal now has three touchdowns in two games. I keep fading him, and he keeps producing. Pascal’s nine catches this season have netted 81 yards for an average of 9.0 yards per catch. The touchdowns are floating his value, with the respectable catch totals a bit of gravy in PPR formats. But this is a fragile production profile, and it gets even more fragile with backup QB Jacob Eason at the helm for the Colts. I have Pascal ranked WR65 this week … which probably means he’ll score two more touchdowns. 

A.J. Brown: About the only element of the Titans’ offense that didn’t work against Seattle in Week 2 was Brown. He was targeted nine times for 174 air yards but produced just three catches for 43 yards. Pro Football Reference charged him with three drops in that game. Titans fans on Twitter seemed to be counting four. No matter … it was an uncharacteristically bad performance from one of the league’s best young receivers. The Colts’ cornerbacks aren’t a bad group, but they’ve struggled early on. You’re obviously playing Brown in redraft. I could also see the appeal of betting on a bounce-back game and taking him for $6,500 on DraftKings.

Julio Jones: After a quiet Week 1, Jones showed up in a big way against the Seahawks in Week 2, catching six passes for 128 yards. He lost a touchdown on a dubious replay overturn whereby his heel was judged to have touched the chalk at the back of the endzone. (A number of angles seemed to show that his heel was still inbounds.) Now that we’ve seen Julio click with Ryan Tannehill, it’s safe to go back into the water. Insert Jones into all of your lineups. His DraftKings price is $6,500, same as A.J. Brown‘s, and if I were going to use one or the other, I’d opt for Brown.

Tight Ends

Jack Doyle: Doyle’s snaps and routes got a boost in Week 2, and he turned the additional opportunity into five catches for 64 yards. It’s not that I’m opposed to the idea of a Jack Doyle revival (yes, “revival” – the man had 80 catches in 2017). It’s that I can’t buy a Jack Doyle revival with a backup quarterback. He’s not playable in redraft this week, and there are other cheap options I like more in DFS

Anthony Firkser: A knee injury kept Firkser sidelined in Week 2, and he wasn’t practicing this week as of Wednesday. He’d be a dicey start off the injury if indeed he’s able to play. Otherwise, the TE position will be manned by Geoff Swaim, MyCole Pruitt, and Tommy Hudson. No thank you.

New Orleans Saints vs New England Patriots

Date/Time: Sunday September 26, 1:00pm ET
BettingPros Consensus Spread: Patriots -3
BettingPros Consensus Over/Under: 43 points
Implied Vegas point totals
: Patriots 23, Saints 20

Quarterbacks

Jameis Winston: The goodwill Winston generated with a five-TD performance in the Saints’ Week 1 blowout of the Packers quickly dissipated with a 111-yard, zero-TD, two-INT stink bomb against the Panthers in Week 2. Which of those performances was the real Jameis? We know the answer: both. The Dr. Jekyll of Week 1 became the Mr. Hyde of Week 2. Which one will show up against the Patriots in Week 3? Your guess is as good as mine, but with New England allowing only one TD pass so far while notching five interceptions, Mr. Hyde could very well hang around for another week. Use Winston at your own peril. 

Mac Jones: With the Patriots keeping the Jets at arm’s length in Week 2, Jones was cast into the role of game manager. He completed 22 of 30 throws for 186 yards, with no touchdowns or interceptions. Ho-hum. This week, the rookie from Alabama will be facing a Saints defense that harassed Aaron Rodgers into the worst start of his career in Week 1 but then was made to look bad by Sam Darnold in Week 2. I have Jones ranked as a back-end QB2, which might even be overly optimistic. The Patriots have been keeping him manacled in that offense.

Running Backs

Alvin Kamara and Tony Jones: Everything went sideways for the Saints’ offense last week against the Panthers, so let’s ignore Kamara’s 8-5-0 rushing line. It was just sort of a lost week for him. New Orleans ran only 43 offensive plays, so there wasn’t much of an opportunity for Kamara to produce. Still, it’s a little concerning that he has only 33 receiving yards. Naturally, you’re still using Kamara in redraft, but I need a “show me” week from the Saints’ offense before I spend up for Kamara in DFS.

Damien Harris and James White: With rookie Rhamondre Stevenson fumbling on his first touch of Week 1 and being deactivated for Week 2, it appears Harris has no real competition for early-down work. He’s logged 39 carries for 162 yards and a touchdown. This could be a tough week for him, though. The Saints have held opposing runners to 2.8 yards per carry this season even though they’ve faced Aaron Jones and Christian McCaffrey. You’re probably starting Harris in redraft under most circumstances, but don’t look his way in DFS. 

Wide Receivers

Marquez Callaway: The Saints’ WR situation is pretty gross. I was hoping Callaway’s no-show in Week 1 was simply a one-off, and that he’d bounce back in Week 2 after escaping the coverage of Packers CB Jaire Alexander. Not so: Callaway had two catches for eight yards against Carolina. This week, Callaway is going to run most of his routes against Patriots CB Jalen Mills. It wouldn’t be fair to say Mills is terrible, but if Callaway disappears again with this matchup, it may never happen for him.

Jakobi Meyers: A 10-82-0 stat line two games into the season isn’t very exciting, but in the context of the Patriots’ first two games, Meyers’ numbers don’t look that bad. The Pats have been fairly conservative on offense, so we probably weren’t going to get a blowup game from a wide receiver. It’s becoming clear that Meyers is a possession guy and not a playmaker. His average depth of target this season is just 4.3 yards. Meyers’ outlook may be slightly enhanced this week by the likelihood that teammate Nelson Agholor will be up against the Saints’ best able-bodied cornerback, Bradly Roby, which might funnel an extra target or two in Meyers’ direction. I have Meyers ranked as a back-end WR4 this week.

Nelson Agholor: As Derek Carr‘s primary deep threat last year, Agholor’s average depth of target was 15.5 yards. So far with the Patriots, it’s only 7.7 yards – and yet that still qualifies Agholor as the vertical receiver in what’s been an extremely conservative passing attack. After Agholor’s 5-72-1 performance in Week 1, we won’t panic over a 3-21-0 stat line in Week 2. But a bounce-back effort may be tricky this week against Saints CB Bradley Roby, a solid cover man. Agholor is a WR5 for this week and not a DFS option.

Tight Ends

Juwan Johnson and Adam Trautman: After playing 19% of the Saints’ offensive snaps in Week 1, Johnson had a 41% snap share in Week 2. He scored two touchdowns in the opener but had only one catch in Week 2, a 23-yarder. He’s not startable in a tough Week 2 matchup vs. New England, although Johnson is roster-worthy in most leagues. Trautman’s snap share slipped in Week 2, and he wasn’t targeted at all. Not an encouraging sign.

Jonnu Smith and Hunter Henry: Not gonna lie: I’m still trying to find the answer key to the Smith/Henry quiz. Somehow I knew it was going to be this way when the two of them signed with the Patriots a day apart. After they both played about three-quarters of the offensive snaps in Week 1, Henry played 81% of the Week 2 snaps while Smith played 50%. Smith has out-targeted Henry 10-7, but Henry’s average depth of target (3.0 yards) is a little sexier than Jonnu’s (0.6 yards). Naturally, I have them ranked back to back this week, with Smith at TE14 and Henry at TE15.

Atlanta Falcons vs New York Giants

Date/Time: Sunday September 26, 1:00pm ET
BettingPros Consensus Spread: Giants -3
BettingPros Consensus Over/Under: 48.5 points
Implied Vegas point totals
: Giants 25.75, Falcons 22.75

Quarterbacks

Matt Ryan: Things are looking bleak for the Atlanta passing game. After a disastrous season opener against Philadelphia in which he threw for 164 yards and was battered by the Eagles’ pass rush, Ryan managed to throw for 300 yards against the pass-funnel Buccaneers defense in Week 2, but he threw three interceptions as the Falcons tried their best to hang around late in the game. There are so few positive signs here. Ryan is averaging 5.7 yards per pass attempt, and his average target depth is 4.3 yards. He simply isn’t usable in any format right now. Basically, all we’re hoping for is that Ryan can do enough to float the value of Calvin Ridley and Kyle Pitts.

Daniel Jones: Behold the power of the running quarterback! Jones ranks 15th in passing yardage and is tied for 21st in TD passes, yet he currently stands QB5 in fantasy scoring because he’s run for 122 yards and two touchdowns. He’ll face an Atlanta defense that has given up a league-high eight TD passes, and the Falcons also gave up 62 rushing yards to Jalen Hurts in Week 1. I have Jones ranked as a midrange QB2 this week, but you could probably make the case that he deserves to be a high-end QB2. At $5,400, he has some DraftKings appeal.

Running Backs

Mike Davis and Cordarrelle Patterson: I thought Mike Davis was being grossly overdrafted this summer because he was being projected for a workload not befitting a 28-year-old career backup. The reason he was being projected for so many touches was the absence of obvious challengers on the Falcons’ roster. Qadree Ollison, who hadn’t flashed in two previous seasons in Atlanta? Nope. Released. Javian Hawkins, an undrafted rookie free agent? Nope. Released. It looks like I was right about someone stepping forward to share the load with Davis, but I picked the wrong guy. I thought it would be Wayne Gallman, signed earlier this month. Gallman’s NFL credentials aren’t unlike those of Davis, and I thought they might split the workload almost evenly. Nope. Gallman hasn’t suited up yet. It turns out the 1b to Davis’s 1a was under our noses the whole time: Cordarrelle Patterson. We can be forgiven for not recognizing a 30-year-old converted wide receiver/kick returner as a potential RB asset, even though he backed up David Montgomery in Chicago last year after Tarik Cohen got hurt. Through two games, Patterson has 14-65-1 as a runner and 7-71-1 as a receiver. That makes him the RB10 in fantasy scoring (half-point PPR) or the WR21, depending on where your league has him eligible. Davis, meanwhile, is the RB30. He’s collected 135 yards from scrimmage but hasn’t found the end zone. The Falcons’ passing game has mostly been a sinkhole, but head coach Arthur Smith is creating RB value in Atlanta. Maybe Patterson’s usage won’t stick, but someone has to share this backfield with Davis, and Patterson has done a pretty nice job of it so far. I have him ranked RB35 and WR44 this week. I think I’ll be above the expert consensus ranking on Patterson at both positions, but it still feels like a conservative ranking. I have Davis at RB29.

Saquon Barkley: His Week 2 numbers weren’t very exciting and would have looked a lot like his lousy Week 1 numbers if not for a 41-yard run, but the spike in Barkley’s snap rate offers reason for optimism. The Giants handled him with kid gloves in Week 1, letting him on the field for 48% of the Giants’ offensive snaps. In Week 2, he played 84% of the offensive snaps. Plus, we saw a burst on that long run down the right sideline. Now it’s just a matter of plugging him into your lineup each week and waiting for Saquon to be Saquon again.

Wide Receivers

Calvin Ridley: A two-game sample size is pretty small, but so far most of Ridley’s numbers fall into line with his career norms. Targets per game, receptions per game, catch rate, TD rate, average depth of target – all pretty close to his career baselines. The two exceptions are yards per catch and yards per game. Ridley has never averaged under 12.8 yards per catch, and last year he was up to 15.3. So far this year he’s at 9.5. And after averaging 66.6 yards per game in 2019 and 91.6 yards per game in 2020, he’s at 57.0 in 2021. Again, it’s a small sample size, but the problem seems to be that the Atlanta passing game simply isn’t producing big plays. Maybe that changes this week, but Ridley will be dealing with ace cover man James Bradbury on at least some of his snaps. Ridley still falls within WR1 range this week, but the slippage in the rankings has begun. At $7,000 in DraftKings this week, Ridley doesn’t have much appeal. 

Olamide Zaccheaus: Russell Gage is expected to miss Week 3 with an ankle injury. The Falcons worked out John Brown earlier this week but hadn’t signed him as of this writing. That leaves Zaccheaus at the No. 2 receiver. He’s not worth your consideration yet, though I suspect he’s a better player than Gage.

Sterling Shepard: Seemingly enjoying a career renaissance at age 28, Shepard’s stat line of 16-207-1 has him on pace to blow away his single-season highs in receptions (66) and yardage (872). Slot duty has always suited him, and he’s back where he belongs, lining up in the slot on about two-thirds of his snaps. Even with Kenny Golladay now in the fold, Shepard has commanded a 27.9% target share so far. He’ll get a favorable matchup against Isaiah Oliver this week. I have him ranked WR29 and really like his $5,900 price tag on DraftKings.

Kenny Golladay: After missing most of training camp with a hamstring injury, Golladay can be forgiven for getting off to a sluggish start with his new team. We’ll even give him extra credit for yelling at Giants offensive coordinator Jason Garrett on the sidelines last week, because who among us fantasy managers hasn’t wanted to yell at Jason Garrett? Maybe Golladay gets it going this week against Atlanta’s beatable outside cornerbacks, Fabian Moreau and A.J. Terrell. I have Golladay at WR35 this week.

Darius Slayton: His average depth of target is 15.0 yards, and he’s averaging 19.8 yards per catch. Slayton is a home run hitter, but will he get enough at-bats to make a difference? Slayton’s Week 2 snap share was 57%. With Evan Engram possibly returning from a calf injury this week, the Giants might use two-TE sets a bit more, which would further chop Slayton’s snaps. His raw numbers so far (6-119-1) are intriguing, but Slayton’s production profile hints at inevitable streakiness.

Tight Ends

Kyle Pitts: He caught 5 of 6 targets for 73 yards against the Buccaneers last week, and his season totals (9-104-0) are more than respectable for a rookie tight end playing in a dysfunctional passing game. There’s not much to else to say. Keep playing the talented rookie. All is well.

Evan Engram: Engram is back at practice this week, though on a limited basis. He’s one of the more athletic tight ends in the league but has been considered an underachiever after failing to build on an exciting 2017 rookie season. With Sterling Shepard off to a great start, Kenny Golladay and Darius Slayton fighting for downfield targets, and Saquon Barkley catching passes near the line of scrimmage, what’s left for Engram? Wait for a “show me” game before sticking him into your lineup.

This season, the Primer is presented by Pristine Auction. They are going to be providing giveaways throughout the season. See below for how to win a signed Deebo Samuel jersey! Congrats to Steve from Corpus Christi, TX, the winner of the Lamar Jackson jersey giveaway!

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