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Dynasty Rookie 2QB/Superflex Mock Draft: Five Rounds (2020 Fantasy Football)

Jun 4, 2020

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We provided a two-round dynasty rookie mock draft after our first-round mock. Next up, our writers are providing a full five-round dynasty rookie mock draft. This is for a 12-team, PPR, 2QB/Superflex dynasty fantasy football league. Each writer provides a pick along with their reasoning for the selection.

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2020 Dynasty Rookie Mock Draft: Five Rounds

Pick 1.01 – Jonathan Taylor (RB – IND)
Despite being extremely pro-quarterback in superflex/2QB formats, Jonathan Taylor remains my rookie 1.01. In most situations, my teams are set at quarterback based on the way I build in the startup drafts. If I am in trouble at the quarterback position, especially leagues that I took Andrew Luck in startups at the beginning of the 2019 offseason, I have no issue taking Burrow or Tagovailoa at 1.01.

With that said, based on college production, measurables, and landing spot, Taylor still edges out Clyde Edwards-Helaire for the top running back spot in this year’s rookie class. There are many that are concerned with Taylor’s usage in college and the heavy workload, but there is little evidence suggesting that we should be worried about any type of correlation between heavy workload in college and lack of longevity in the NFL. While owners will have to deal with Marlon Mack eating into Taylor’s workload in 2020, there is no doubt in my mind that Jonathan Taylor will be a beneficiary of opportunity and strong offensive line play in 2021 and beyond.
– John Bauer (@TheBauerClub)

Pick 1.02 – Clyde Edwards-Helaire (RB – KC)
With Taylor gone, this pick essentially comes down to need. If I had aging or subpar quarterbacks on my team, then I would select Burrow solely based on the scarcity and high upside of the quarterback position. However, I wanted to take Clyde Edwards-Helaire here because I believe the Kansas City running back will have greater short-term scoring potential over Burrow.

We have already seen how the Chiefs’ backfield can be a fantasy goldmine. In 2017, when Kareem Hunt spearheaded the Kansas City backfield, he finished as the PPR RB4. The next season, Hunt and Williams finished as the RB6 and RB5 respectively during their tenures as the starter. The only outlier for this backfield was last season, where the Chiefs had rotated five running backs throughout the year due to a rash of injuries. The Kansas City brass over-drafted Edwards-Helaire because Patrick Mahomes hand-selected him and Andy Reid compared him to Brian Westbrook. Given his pass-catching acumen and ability to shed tackles with ease, I love the rookie’s chances to make an immediate impact in 2020 and become a featured member of this offense down the stretch.

While Burrow struggles early given the shortened offseason, his porous offensive line, and Cincinnati’s difficult division, Edwards-Helaire will be catching passes in a high-octane offense led by arguably the best quarterback in the league. Even if he splits time with Damien Williams, I like the rookie’s chances to become a mainstay for fantasy. At 1.02, I’ll take the tremendous upside of Edwards-Helaire unless I desperately need a quarterback.
– Dan Ambrosino (@AmbrosinoNFL)

Pick 1.03 – Joe Burrow (QB – CIN)
I was extremely shocked to see Joe Burrow fall to me at the third pick in a superflex draft, so I was happy to grab him at this pick. Unless I have Patrick Mahomes and Lamar Jackson as my top quarterbacks in a superflex league, I’m drafting Burrow to be a starter. Burrow, at age 23, is a bit older than most college quarterback prospects entering the NFL. That said, he’ll be supplied with a plethora of weapons including A.J. Green, Tyler Boyd, John Ross, and offseason workout partner, Tee Higgins. Additionally, the Bengals’ 2019 first round draft pick, Jonah Williams, will be returning from injury to shore up the offensive line at left tackle. Zac Taylor’s offense never really showed it’s ceiling last year, but injecting Burrow, who threw 60 touchdowns last season, into the offense will provide a much-needed spark. He’s someone I could immediately add to a roster and trust in my starting lineup while having the potential to produce for years to come.
– Sam Hoppen (@SamHoppen)

Pick 1.04 – J.K. Dobbins (RB – BAL)
Drafting Dobbins after CEH and Taylor is a fair deal for me. Selecting him over Swift is no easy choice, but considering the Ravens offense just had the most historic rushing season in NFL history with 3,296 yards – Dobbins ceiling is ridiculous. He recorded 5.04 yards per carry last season and 31 rushes of 15 yards or more, the most in the country. Based off Gus Edwards and Justice Hill combining for 1,051 yards and four touchdowns on 191 carries and 15 receptions is a positive sign for Dobbins’ potential immediate impact behind Mark Ingram. Over time, Dobbins could be the best back in this class, but intil then he has to back the 30-year-old Ingram. I expect Ingram finish RB11 or higher this again in standard and PPR leagues with Dobbins finishing higher than Edwards’ 2019 season finishes of RB43 and RB51.
– Vaughn Dalzell (@VaughnDalzell)

Pick 1.05 – D’Andre Swift (RB – DET)
I’ve wound up with Swift in every rookie mock draft we’ve done so far, and I’ll gladly take him again in this spot. Swift’s situation isn’t as exciting as the three tailbacks taken ahead of him, but he has just as much talent to become an every down back in Detroit. Kerryon Johnson’s durability issues through his first two seasons make me think his standing with the Lions is tenuous at best. Johnson and Swift likely split the carries in 2020, but I expect Swift to handle a majority of the third-down responsibilies. And all it takes is another season-ending injury for Johnson to vault Swift into top-12 running back consideration. There’s plenty to like about Swift’s short-term and long-term fantasy potential. I also considered CeeDee Lamb and Tua Tagovailoa here, but opted to take the player at a more scarce position.
– Matt Barbato (@RealMattBarbato)

Pick 1.06 – Tua Tagovailoa (QB – MIA)
Wow, with both QB falling outside the top two picks, that was surprising to me. Don’t get me wrong this RB class is intriguing. I understand wanting a piece of one of these incoming backs, but in Super Flex the value of the QB should never be underestimated. Yes, Tua Tagovalioa enters the NFL with some injury history that has already been well documented. However, when an NFL franchise is willing to still take him inside the top-5, that should be all you need to know. In my opinion, Tua is the 1.02 in this format so to get him at the 1.06 is an absolute steal and a no-brainer pick for me. His 2020 production might not be there right out of the gate, but you’re playing the long game here and to acquire a franchise QB at this price is sure to bolster your Super Flex lineup.
– Kyle August (@kyleFFfellas)

Pick 1.07 – Cam Akers (RB – LAR)
With the Los Angeles Rams moving on from Todd Gurley, I’m chomping at the bit to get my hands on Cam Akers. While there’s good reason to be skeptical of the Rams’ offensive line, fortunately for Akers, he’s no stranger to finding steady production despite his hog mollies up front. Florida State’s offensive line left a lot to be desired under Willie Taggart, illustrated by Akers recording 2,186 yards after contact throughout his college career. This pick reminds me a lot of 2017 when the Minnesota Vikings replaced their longtime running back legend, Adrian Peterson, with another Florida State product by the name of Dalvin Cook. Similar to the current state of the Rams’ offensive line, the Vikings’ pipeline experienced their fair share of struggles in Cook’s first few years as a pro. I’m betting on Sean McVay with this selection as he enters a new era with Akers in his offense.
– Rob Searles (@robbob17)

Pick 1.08 – CeeDee Lamb (WR – DAL)
To get the top-rated receiver in this draft with the 8th pick in this draft is a steal. That’s the benefit of a 2QB draft, as the top-2 quarterbacks in this class are sure to push elite talent down the board in Round 1. Lamb checks out as one of the best receiving prospects we’ve seen since Amari Cooper, a player whom, ironically, Lamb will call a teammate in Dallas. He possesses elite athleticism, and his 21.4 YPR led this entire class. He joins a prolific offense where Dak Prescott threw for over 5,000 yards last year. Randall Cobb and Tavon Austin combined for over 60 catches and over 1,000 yards last year. Neither has the talent of Lamb, so the rookie could esaily produce a low-end WR2 or WR3 season in his first season. The Cowboys can move on from Amari Cooper’s contract after 2021, and given Cooper’s struggles with consistency, it’s not far-fetched to envison Lamb assuming a WR1 role on this team by then.
– Paul Ghiglieri (FantasyGhigs)

Pick 1.09 – Justin Herbert (QB – LAC)
In this area of the first round, roster needs are very important. Just remember that quarterback is king in SuperFlex leagues. QBs insulate value well so there is always a chance to move on down the road in a two QB league. Keeping that in mind, it’s hard to pass on Herbert. He may not start in 2021, but there is also a chance he takes over sooner than later. When I evaluated Herbert, there was a clear drop-off from Tua and Burrow, but he still offers tremendous upside as he’s more mobile than people think. I expect Herbert to unseat Tyrod Taylor early (like Baker Mayfield in 2018) and produce somewhere between Daniel Jones and Josh Allen numbers. He reminds me a lot of Josh Allen. What do all these signal callers have in common? Jones, Allen and Herbert were all roasted by Draft Twitter saying they shouldn’t be drafted so high. Reach or not, look at how the value of Jones and Allen now, it has skyrocketed over the last year. Taking a shot on a QB here with such a deep rookie WR class still available and all the stud RBs off the board.
– Josh Dalley (@JoshDalley72)

Pick 1.10 – Jerry Jeudy (WR – DEN)
In a real draft, I’d be trying to trade down at this point and hoping someone else bites in the top of this wide tier of WRs plus Vaughn. However, in the mock draft, I can’t trade, so Jerry Jeudy is the pick. Jeudy enters a new-look Broncos offense with early first-round draft capital and an inside track to being a Day One starter. Jeudy was impressive (as Alabama WRs go), racking up a 25% Dominator Rating, 17/2 yards per catch, and a Sophomore season breakout at Age 19.4 (82nd-percentile). In an offense that is always smattered with NFL talent, the Breakout Age is the true window into Jeudy’s ability and upside. The Broncos enter 2020 with Tight Ends Noah Fant (4.50 wheels), Albert Okwuegbunam (4.49), and now Jerry Jeudy (4.45), as well as K.J. Hamler, who didn’t run an official 40-yard dash, but was clocked at 3.93 on GPS with a running start, translating to about a low-4.3s time in GM Jon Elway’s mind. Either way, the Broncos offense is fast. Jeudy is one of the few players on the team who is versatile enough to do it all, so while the speedsters on the team will help from a real-football perspective, and Courtland Sutton will make the highlight-reel contested catches, Jeudy could well be the team’s target hog as soon as this season. Expect Jeudy to feast sooner rather than later, unless of course Drew Lock is a major bust.
– Mark Leipold (@LeipoldNFL)

Pick 1.11 – Jalen Reagor (WR – PHI)
If I’m going to take a wide receiver in the first round of a rookie draft, it needs to be one that can produce immediately. That’s Jalen Reagor. He should immediately step into the WR3 role as beating out Greg Ward shouldn’t be difficult. There’s also a 0% chance 34 year old DeSean Jackson plays 16 games. He probably won’t even play 10 games. Alshon Jeffery has also not exactly been the pinnacle health. At various points last season, Ward was the Eagles’ WR1. This year, that can be Reagor. Either way, Jackson is gone after 2020 and Jeffery may go, too. That puts Reagor in the enviable position of having a clear path to stardom in the future with the possibility of immediate production. He’s also a talented player with upper echeleon speed and 99th percentile burst.
– Jason Katz (@jasonkatz13)

Pick 1.12 – Ke’Shawn Vaughn (RB – TB)
Picking at 1.12 usually means one already has a championship level roster, so at this point in the draft I am looking for immediate upside. With Ke’Shawn Vaughn still on the board, the opportunity to land a potential lead back is too good to pass up. While many believe that Vaughn will be the one to emerge as the starter in Tampa Bay, it would be unwise to suggest that Ronald Jones, Dare Ogunbowale, and perhaps even Raymond Calais will not factor into weekly game plans.

Vaughn is a talented running back who appears to have landed on the perfect depth chart for immediate value. It is perfectly understandable as to why my colleagues let him drop to 1.12, as Tampa Bay could easily add veteran competition, or a future blue chip rookie to the backfield before his rookie contract is up. Not discussed enough prior to the 2020 NFL Draft due to his depth chart dependent upside, Vaughn has the power, explosiveness, and receiving ability to become a weekly RB2 fixture. Bruce Arians offense has often been kind to running backs, and with Tom Brady under center the running back position should see their target share rise versus what we saw last season with Jameis Winston. There may be players still on the board with more long term dynasty value, but the immediate returns Vaughn promises are too good to pass on for a team picking from the league championship spot.
– Raju Byfield (fantasycontext)

Pick 2.01 – Justin Jefferson (WR – MIN)
I was pleasantly surprised to see Justin Jefferson slip to the beginning of the 2nd round, as CeeDee Lamb is the lone wide receiver ahead of him in my rookie rankings. With Stefon Diggs being traded to Buffalo, Minnesota appeared to be one of the premiere landing spots for potential early production from a rookie wide receiver. Within the dynasty community, there is slight concern with the amount of opportunity that Justin Jefferson will see from the slot, as Minnesota passes out of 12 personnel (2 tight ends) at one of the highest rates in the NFL. However, Justin Jefferson had great success lining up outside while at LSU, which shows he is not going to be reduced to a slot-only role. With little competition for a starting role with the Vikings in 2020 outside of Adam Thielen, Justin Jefferson, currently only 20 years old, is poised for significant opportunity early in his career.
– John Bauer (@TheBauerClub)

Pick 2.02 – Henry Ruggs III (WR – LV)
I haven’t been a huge proponent of Henry Ruggs, but the value of the 12th overall pick falling to the second round is too good to pass up. Many analysts have been down on Ruggs as they figure he’ll be a one-trick pony in an offense with severe competition for targets; Derek Carr’s arm talent also doesn’t inspire much confidence as Ruggs is a vertical threat who’s fantasy value will come primarily from long receptions. To be fair, those have been my criticisms as well. Yet, his upside is still incredible. Ruggs was able to manage 17.4 yards per reception in college and caught nearly 75 percent of his passes over the last two seasons. Ruggs doesn’t only need to run a fly route to be effective; the former Alabama receiver can also break tackles with ease and be physical when the opportunity presents itself. The speedy wideout can thrive on creating yards after the catch by taking a slant or screen pass to the house. Henry Ruggs could very well end up like Marquise Brown, who saw fantasy relevant performances despite low volume in a run-heavy offense. Getting a receiver picked in the top-twelve of the NFL draft this late down the board is tremendous, so I’ll take the reduced price on the Raiders’ No. 1 wideout.
– Dan Ambrosino (@AmbrosinoNFL)

Pick 2.03 – Tee Higgins (WR – CIN)
I’m completing a Cincinnati stack by taking the Bengals second-round pick in Tee Higgins. He may not be the WR1 on his team right now, but he’s got a lot going for him and his future outlook. Higgins reminds many people of Mike Williams, another former Clemson receiver, as a big receiver who uses his size to his advantage and makes downfield plays. This is evidenced by his 19.1 yards per reception mark in 2019. He’s also a reliable pass-catcher; per PFF, he dropped just six of 120 catchable passes over the past two seasons. Additionally, Higgins recorded 28 contested catches throughout his college career. Moreover, this will likely be A.J. Green’s final year with the Bengals, so Higgins will have the opportunity to fill in for Green when he’s gone. In fact, Tyler Boyd and John Ross are currently the only two receivers under contract past the 2020 season, so Higgins could quickly become a staple in the passing offense. He’s also tied to Joe Burrow for the foreseeable future, and they’ll have plenty of time to establish a strong connection with each other. Burrow and Higgins had been working out together this offseason, so it’s fair to assume they’ve already built some chemistry. Higgins could find the field this season in three-wideout sets with a chance to see more playing time in the years to come.
– Sam Hoppen (@SamHoppen)

Pick 2.04 – Michael Pittman Jr. (WR – IND)
I land another selection with a high ceiling, pairing Dobbins with Pittman. Pittman immediately ranks into a WR3 position with the Colts, and possibly as high as No. 1 at points in the season. Considering T.Y. Hilton has missed eight games in the past two seasons and enters a contract year at 30-years-old – there’s present and future value in Pittman. The Colts leading fantasy receiver last season was Zach Pascal (135.3) with a WR52 finish in PPR leagues and Hilton wasn’t far behind (WR52) despite missing a career-high six games in 2019. Throw in an improved and veteran quarterback in Philip Rivers and Indianapolis becomes a prime landing spot for a receiver like Pittman.
– Vaughn Dalzell (@VaughnDalzell)

Pick 2.05 – Denzel Mims (WR – NYJ)
Mims is an exciting prospect who pairs a prototypical, 6-foot-3 frame with a 4.38-second 40-yard dash time and an incredible catch radius. Watch some of his highlights and you’ll see a prospect who can bring down any ball if it’s thrown near him. However, his hands and concentration are question marks that will need to improve at the next level. Mims also joins a roster that is desperate for young receiving talent. The top pass catchers on New York’s depth chart includes Breshad Perriman, Jamison Crowder, Vyncint Smith and first-round bust Josh Doctson. Sam Darnold still possesses plenty of potential to be a franchise quarterback and should take a step forward with better protection in front of him. With some development, Mims and Darnold could become the pass catching duo of the future for the Jets.
– Matt Barbato (@RealMattBarbato)

Pick 2.06 – Brandon Aiyuk (WR – SF)
For me, the clear cut off point in Super Flex league is the 2.07, which is extremely deep when comparing to other draft classes. With a record-setting number of WRs being taken in the first two rounds of this year’s NFL Draft, there is a ton of talent at this position but Brandon Aiyuk appears to be a player dynasty owners aren’t excited about. After the 49ers decided to take Javon Kinlaw at pick #14 in the NFL Draft, passing on the opportunity to take either Jerry Jeudy or CeeDee Lamb, they got their man as the 6th WR off the board at pick #25. In this mock, Aiyuk comes off the board as the 9th WR drafted, which is faily consistiant with where I’ve seen him taken in rookie drafts over the past month or so. The landing spot doesn’t look ideal when you consider the 49ers had a lot of production on the ground in 2019, they already have a #1 target in George Kittle, and another young WR in Deebo Samuel. However, a WR with Round 1 draft capital in a Kyle Shanahan offense still carries nice value here in the middle of the second round. While I’ll agree that Samuel has a lot of talent, he doesn’t profile as a high volume WR and I could see Aiyuk taking over as the #2 option in this passing game sooner rather than later.
– Kyle August (@kyleFFfellas)

Pick 2.07 – Laviska Shenault Jr. (WR – JAC)
After finding myself on the wrong end of a receiver run midway through the second round, I’m not exactly thrilled with Laviska Shenault Jr. here at 2.07. A supremely talented individual, no doubt, but injury concerns and an unideal landing spot have me shaking in my boots over here. Drawing frequent comparisons to Cordarrelle Patterson, it’ll be up to Jay Gruden to figure out a way to get his swiss army knife meaningful touches in his first year as the Jaguars’ offensive coordinator. Don’t get me wrong, Doug Marrone and Gruden are saying all the right things following their selection of Shenault, but Coach Speak in April and what an NFL offense looks like in the heart of the season are clearly two different animals. Here’s to hoping that Shenault can miraculously find a clean bill of health and an innovative coaching staff!
– Rob Searles (@robbob17)

Pick 2.08 – Bryan Edwards (WR – LV)
Bryan Edwards earned solid Day 2 draft capital when the Las Vegas Raiders selected him in the third round, but GM Mike Mayock had a second round grade on him. Had Edwards not injured himself and missed the Combine, he almost certainly would have been taken in the second round. Regardless, Edwards broke out at age 17 in college, the earliest age ever for a receiver to command at least 20% of his team’s total receiving yards and touchdowns. His 48.4% college dominator rating is the second highest in this loaded class, eclipsed only by the mercurial Tyler Johnson. Edwards stands tall at 6’3″, with a thickly built, 212-pound frame that is nearly identical to Michael Thomas. Derek Carr compared him to Anquan Boldin already, so Edwards profiles as somebody who could take the mantle as the next great big-bodied slot receiver in the NFL, racking up receptions over the middle while piling up yards and scores for your fantasy team.
– Paul Ghiglieri (FantasyGhigs)

Pick 2.09 – Darrynton Evans (RB – TEN)
This is a tough pick after a massive run on receivers. The drop off in WR talents after Edwards is not worth reaching for here in my opinion. The lack of talent at tight end and already using my first round pick on Herbert pretty much push me towards running backs. AJ Dillon, Van Jefferson and KJ Hamler are all assets I think most would consider here, but I think won’t earn value quickly enough for in this spot. Therefore, if this were a real draft, I’d have traded the pick. However, in this excercie, I’m going with pure upside. Look to the Titans backfield, we have the returning rushing champion and behind him is Evans. Geoff Lambert clued me in to Evans before the draft and I’ll admit, I loved what I saw. His landing spot is incredible as he could have a shot at starting in 2021. Short term, he’s just one play away from a ridiculous amount of opportunity. He could be a guy that nets you a solid return next offseason.
– Josh Dalley (@JoshDalley72)

Pick 2.10 – Zack Moss (RB – BUF)
I’m not crazy about Moss as a prospect, but this value is too good to ignore. Moss was a day two pick and will slide nicely into a committee with Devin Singletary, and while Singletary should lead in targets, Moss would figure to get more carries and be the goal-line back (when Josh Allen isn’t calling his own number). Moss was a prolific producer at Utah, posting three straight 1,000-yard seasons including over 35% of the team’s total offense in his senior season. Moss’s 6.3 yards per carry and his 9.0% target share were both well above average, too. He has a strong production profile, but after faceplanting with a 4.65 40-yard dash (46th-percentile Speed Score), Moss leaves questions about his true athleticism — he allegedly had an injury. Moss has a pretty strong profile with questions eminating both from the landing spot and the athletic testing, but once he starts going behind day three players, it’s time to smash the “draft” button.
– Mark Leipold (@LeipoldNFL)

Pick 2.11 – Antonio Gibson (RB – WAS)
Taking a Washington running back is probably unwise as the depth chart is just packed with uncertainty. With that being said, Antonio Gibson comes with day two draft capital and elite 99th percentile speed. He is also a proficient pass catcher with a 12.7% college target share. While there’s quantity on Washington, there’s not exactly quality. Derrius Guice is talented, but can’t stay healthy. Adrian Peterson has no business still being in the NFL. Bryce Love hasn’t played a down due to injury and may never be fully healthy. J.D. McKissic is designed to replace Chris Thompson, but Washington doesn’t really owe him anything. Peyton Barber can easily be cut in the preseason. Gibson has a chance to make an impact and possibly be big part of a committee.
– Jason Katz (@jasonkatz13)

Pick 2.12 – A.J. Dillon (RB – GB)
A.J. Dillon could prove to be a massive steal at 2.12. His long term upside under Matt LaFleur is that of a high end RB2, but dynasty owners may be forced to wait a season or two before he gets there. He will be stuck behind Aaron Jones as a rookie, but will also have to contend with Jamaal Williams for snaps. An abnormally large, but yet still athletic running back in the Derrick Henry mold, there is little doubt that LaFleur has visions of Dillon dominating between the tackles and wearing defenses down the same way Derrick Henry did last season. Now this is not to say that Dillon is the same level of a prospect as Henry was. He is not. But Dillon does possess much of the same tool set as an athletic running back who is bigger than many linebackers. Drafting Dillon means you assume the risk of the Packers re-signing or extending Aaron Jones, but at 2.12 he is more than worth the gamble. Despite Aaron Jones success in 2019, Dillon should get plenty of short yardage and goal line work as a rookie while he makes his case for a role on early downs as well.
– Raju Byfield (fantasycontext)

Pick 3.01 – Anthony McFarland Jr. (RB – PIT)
Anthony McFarland is one of those players that could ultimately end up being a zero long-term, but early in the 3rd round, I felt more than comfortable taking that gamble. As the NFL draft progressed, it seemed more and more likely that the Pittsburgh Steelers felt good with James Conner as the lead back heading into the 2020 season, especially with the rumors swirling that Pittsburgh could be interested in using their 2nd round pick on a running back like Taylor, Akers, or Dobbins. In my mind, Anthony McFarland’s opportunity goes hand in hand with the health of James Conner, who we know is not necessarily the epitome of a clean bill of health. We have seen Benny Snell and Jaylen Samuels and I feel confident in saying that neither of those 2 backs are the future in Pittsburgh. With James Conner on the last year of his contract, there is an opportunity for Anthony McFarland to make in impact in 2021, if not 2020.
– John Bauer (@TheBauerClub)

Pick 3.02 – Van Jefferson (WR – LAR)
This was a tough choice between Jefferson and Claypool, but I elected to draft the receiver who will have a better long-term outlook in my opinion. Jefferson will slide in as the third receiver in an offense that produced two top-twenty fantasy wideouts in 2019. McVay and company may switch to more 12 personnel this season, but Jefferson has all of the traits necessary to see sufficient playing time. The former Ole Miss product matches Robert Woods and Cooper Kupp very similarly in skill set, as he is an adept route runner and possession receiver. With Cooper Kupp and Josh Reynolds set to hit free agency after this season, the Rams’ second pick in the 2020 draft could develop into a featured option in the passing game in McVay’s offense.
– Dan Ambrosino (@AmbrosinoNFL)

Pick 3.03 – Chase Claypool (WR – PIT)
For my third pick, I continued to follow my best-player-available strategy. At this point, it was Chase Claypool, the Notre Dame wide receiver product. He became the fourth straight second-round wide receiver taken by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the draft. It took until Claypool’s senior year for him to truly show his full potential. As a senior, he posted 1,037 receiving yards on 66 receptions, converting 13 of those into touchdowns. Additionally, a third of his receptions went at least 20 yards, which exhibits his explosiveness. All signs point to JuJu Smith-Schuster no longer being on the team past the 2020 season, which would open up the door for Claypool to play on two-receiver sets. While he may not be super productive as a rookie, the Steelers have a tremendous track record of turning wide receivers into very valuable fantasy assets.
– Sam Hoppen (@SamHoppen)

Pick 3.04 – Cole Kmet (TE – CHI)
Landing the No. 1 tight end here is another strong addition to my draft, grabbing my RB3 (Dobbins), WR5 (Pittman), and TE1 (Kmet) in my rookie rankings. Yes, the Bears have Jimmy Graham and Adam Sheehan, but that doesn’t bother me for his short or long-term production. Chicago wants to win so they bring in Nick Foles who posted strong numbers with tight ends. During the 2017 season with the Eagles, Foles targeted Ertz 46 times in six games and 65 times in seven games during the 2018 season. The Bears passing attack was centered on Allen Robinson and now they get a little more diversified with these offseason additions. Kmet was the only tight end taken in the first 90 picks off of 43 receptions for 515 yards and six-touchdown season as a junior. Some of his best work came against Notre Dame’s best competition and Kmet could be the starter as 2021 when the now 33-year-old Graham finishes his two-year $16 million deal with Chicago.
– Vaughn Dalzell (@VaughnDalzell)

Pick 3.05 – KJ Hamler (WR – DEN)
Speed kills in today’s NFL and Hamler possesses plenty of it. The Penn State product has the potential to be the explosive slot receiver in what could be a pretty good Broncos offense. He likely won’t see a ton of volume behind Courtland Sutton, fellow rookie Jerry Jeudy and tight end Noah Fant. And I’m not completely sold on quarterback Drew Lock. But a player of Hamler’s skillset only needs a handful of opportunities per game to be a valuable fantasy contributor. If Hamler improves his hands and his route running skills, he’ll be a lethal weapon in 2020. Hamler was clearly the best player available, and I love the value I got for him in the third round.
– Matt Barbato (@RealMattBarbato)

Pick 3.06 – Joshua Kelley (RB – LAC)
After being selected with the 6th pick of Round 4 in the NFL Draft, Joshua Kelley finds himself in a fairly decent situation for early opprotunities with the Chargers. The former UCLA RB wasn’t a prolific cass catcher at the college level, with just 38 receptions in 22 career games, but the Chargers clearly already have their guy for that role with Austin Ekeler. The bigger question is how much they’re willing to use Ekeler in the ground game. In 2019, Ekeler finished with 132 rush attempts, but 56 (42%) of those came within the first four games of the season before Melvin Gordon’s return. After Gordon was inserted back into the lineup, Ekelers rush attempts dropped from 14 attempts per game to 6.3 and he had zero rushing TDs the rest of the season, after having three in the first four games. Now, Kelley isn’t Melvin Gordon, but from what we saw from this coaching staff last year, the rushing attempts could be split, with even the majority going to another RB besides Ekeler. With Justin Jackson being the only real competition for the RB2 role, Kelley could see some decent rushing volume right out of the gate. I really like the value here in Round 3, even in PPR.
– Kyle August (@kyleFFfellas)

Pick 3.07 – Devin Duvernay (WR – BAL)
Baltimore Ravens offensive coordinator Greg Roman is no stranger to finding his offenses in the basement of the NFL as it pertains to passing volume. Roman’s offenses have ranked 31st or worse in pass attempts in six of his seven years as a coordinator. What gives with Devin Duvernay? While the volume hasn’t always been there for a Roman passing offense, he consistently churns out 1,000 yard receivers. Whether it be Michael Crabtree, Anquan Boldin, or Sammy Watkins, his offense tends to lock in on a single receiver and force feed him targets. Now I don’t know about you, but color me a skeptic on Marquise Brown. His skillset doesn’t exactly scream 100-plus targets year after year. I’ll take Duvernay’s blend of physicality and 4.39 speed, as he’s proven to be a dynamic target hog working out of the slot for Tom Herman’s Texas Longhorns offense. It’s no secret that the Ravens went after a pair of receivers in this year’s draft who are capable of handling a massive target share, as both Duvernay and sixth round pick James Proche eclipsed 100 receptions in 2019. Is the writing on the wall for a case of buyer’s remorse with the Ravens and Hollywood Brown? Sure feels like it.
– Rob Searles (@robbob17)

Pick 3.08 – Antonio Gandy-Golden (WR – WAS)
There are some red flags with Gandy-Golden, who declared after his senior year and ran a slow 4.60 at the Combine. However, the rookie faces minimal competition in Washington, and while his forty time is less than ideal, his speed score (more important) ranks in the 79th percentile and he has plenty of burst for his size. Gandy-Golden was incredibly productive in college, as his 40.5 College Dominator Rating sits in the top tier of this class. The age-19 breakout also helps balance out the disapppinting Day 3 draft capital. He’s raw, but he has great size and plays with an athletic, physical style that should complement Terry McLaurin very well outside.
– Paul Ghiglieri (FantasyGhigs)

Pick 3.09 – Tyler Johnson (WR – TB)
The Bucs stole one of my favorite prospects with the 161st pick. Bruce Arians and company absolutely love this kid, and why wouldn’t they? He showed improvement every step of the way on the way to a monster Senior year at Minnesota and capping it off by balling out for a career game against Auburn. His ideal role would be to stick in the slot and that’s where Tampa should maximize his efforts. We’ve seen years of Bruce Arians having productive slot WRs in his offenses and Tom Brady has a long history of funnelling targets that way. He may be a fifth rounder, but he plays like a second round talent. Every year, a more experienced rookie receiver busts out of the gates and Johnson has a shot to do so in this offense with a pair of stud WRs and Brady to learn from on the way. When I watch him play, he reminds me a lot of Corey Davis, another P.J. Fleck product. It would be hard for him to bust with a fourth round rookie pick, unlike Davis who was the 1.01 in some rookie drafts a few years ago. Johnson could end up being the most productive rookie WR of this class and I wouldn’t be suprised.
– Josh Dalley (@JoshDalley72)

Pick 3.10 – Jordan Love (QB – GB)
Jordan Love is a high-risk, high-reward player, and in a 1QB league, I’d target the massive dual-threat upside of Jalen Hurts before Love. However, in a 2QB or Superflex league, job security receives a premium, so I’m gabbing Love at this slot, as his path to playing time is far clearer. With the Packers reportedly growing at odds with Aaron Rodgers, Love figures to “red shirt” his rookie season and take the reins in 2021 as the Packers’ starting quarterback, but it’s of course possible that he gets on the field sooner. With the Packers trading up for Love in the late first round, it’s a safe bet that he won’t ride the bench for more than one season. As a prospect, Love leaves plenty to be desired, hence being grouped more with Hurts than with even Justin Herbert. Love never topped 64% completion rate in college, nor 8.6 yards per attempt. While he has intriguing athleticism (77th-percentile speed and 88th-percentile burst), he didn’t use his mobility as much in college as you might think — 403 rushing yards and 9 touchdowns in three seasons, which is relatively comparable to Tua Tagovailoa‘s rushing output. Love’s 59.8 college QBR ranks in just the 12th-percentile, capping off a mediocre prospect profile. With the Packers seemingly intent on becoming a run-heavy team, Love’s outlook is murky at best, but he as relative safety in becoming a starter within a year, and at 3.10 in a 2QB rookie draft, it’s impossible to pass on him.
– Mark Leipold (@LeipoldNFL)

Pick 3.11 – Jalen Hurts (QB – PHI)
I don’t know if my proverbial team needs a quarterback, but in Superflex, quarterbacks are hard to come by. Jalen Hurts is the closest thing to Lamar Jackson in this draft. He’s a terrible passer, but, as I’m sure you’ve all noticed by now, you need a quarterback with rushing ability; that’s the new wave of NFL quarterbacks. Hurts rushed for nearly 1300 yards at Oklahoma last season. If Tim Tebow can be a QB1, so can Jalen Hurts. If and when Carson Wentz gets hurt for the 100th time, Hurts will immediately be on the streaming radar.
– Jason Katz (@jasonkatz13)

Pick 3.12 – Eno Benjamin (RB – ARI)
Running back city. At 3.12, Eno Benjamin looked much too good to pass up. DeeJay Dallas would have been my target here, but I allowed myself to be swayed by the Seattle Seahawks signing Carlos Hyde. Hyde joining the team may limit Dallas’ snaps in his audition season, something that associates more risk with his dynasty stock. Eno Benjamin on the other hand may have landed in the perfect system for his skill set. While he profiles as a strict committee back, he has the talent and college production to suggest that he can operate as a lead back, especially on a depth chart like Arizona’s. He is arguably more talented than Kenyan Drake already, but it is easy to see how the two backs could complement each other on offense. THis availability reflects the risk that Benjamin never sees starters snaps in his career, but he has shown enough on tape to make one believe that he can push for, and win the starting role from Drake before the end of the season. Drake is on a one year transition tag, and will likely be headed to free agency in 2021, especially if Benjamin shows enough to make the coaching staff believe that he can indeed be a lead back. Eno Benjamin is a player every dynasty owner should have their eyes on near the end of the third, and into the fourth round of superflex rookie drafts.
– Raju Byfield (fantasycontext)

Pick 4.01 – Lynn Bowden Jr. (RB – LV)
Lynn Bowden Jr. is one of those situations in which there seems to be a market inefficiency. I would include players like Van Jefferson and Chase Claypool in this group as well. While the NFL found it fitting to draft these players in the 2nd or 3rd round, they still seem to be slipping in rookie drafts, hence how I was able to land Lynn Bowden Jr. with the first pick in the 4th round. Bowden is one of those Swiss Army Knife type players that can make an impact in the receiving game, as well as on the ground. Currently categorized as a running back on the Raiders’ depth chart, Bowden is one of the many reasons that Josh Jacobs’ ceiling is capped heading into 2020. By no means do I think Bowden is going to be a fantasy stud, but if you are in a league with deeper starting requirements, Lynn Bowden Jr. is somebody that should be on your radar.
– John Bauer (@TheBauerClub)

Pick 4.02 – Jacob Eason (QB – IND)
This late down the board, I am going to take the position with the most upside in a 2QB/SuperFlex league. Eason may be a fourth round pick, but he has a rocket arm and clearer path to a potential starting job than many of the other Day 2 and Day 3 quarterbacks. Philip Rivers likely only has one or two years left in this league, meaning Eason doesn’t have to wait long to compete for the starting job in Indianapolis. Learning under a potential hall-of-famer in Rivers and offensive guru in Frank Reich will give the raw Eason a chance to develop on the bench in the hopes he can make an impact in the future. Again, this late in the draft, I want to hold someone who has the greatest chance of providing a high return; in this type of league, I’m not letting a quarterback with decent draft capital behind him fall any further.
– Dan Ambrosino (@AmbrosinoNFL)

Pick 4.03 – Lamical Perine (RB – NYJ)
At this point, I hadn’t taken a running back so I went with the best one available in Lamical Perine. This was another forward-looking pick since Le’Veon Bell will still command the starting role in 2020 with Frank Gore mixed in as well. However, after the 2020 season, there’s no guarantee that either of those guys will be with the New York Jets. Throughout college Perine demonstrated the ability to be a factor in both the rushing and passing game. Per PFF, he averaged 3.73 yards after contact per attempt as well as 5.1 yards per carry. He also commanded an 11.8 percent target share in college, putting him in the 84th percentile among running backs in his class. If he is given an opportunity by the Jets, I’m confident that he’ll be able to capitalize on it.
– Sam Hoppen (@SamHoppen)

Pick 4.04 – Donovan Peoples-Jones (WR – CLE)
This is a pure dynasty pick as DPJ’s best-case scenario is a WR3 in this Browns offense if he beats out Rashard Higgins. Higgins caught four passes on 11 targets for 55 yards and a touchdown in 2019, so there may not be much to out-compete on DPJ’s part. Learning and practicing with Beckham Jr. and Landry daily should be motivation enough for the rookie to excel in this offense. DPJ finished his Michigan career with 103 receptions, 1,327 receiving yards, and 14 touchdowns. He only saw 54 targets last season, catching 34 for six touchdowns. In 2018, he had career-highs of 47 receptions on 62 for 612 yards and eight touchdowns. Both seasons he scored 17% of the time he caught the ball and in a Browns offense that struggled passing, he can be a small bright spot.
– Vaughn Dalzell (@VaughnDalzell)

Pick 4.05 – James Proche (WR – BAL)
Proche doesn’t blow you away with his athleticism, but that didn’t stop him from being a baller at SMU. In his final two seasons with the Mustangs, Proche caught 209 passes and scored 27 times. That’s right, 27 touchdowns in two seasons. The man was a beast, to say the least. What he lacks in athleticism he makes up for with incredible instincts and ball skills. Plus, Baltimore simply doesn’t have much proven receiving talent on its depth chart outside of Marquise Brown, who still has a lot to prove in year two. Proche will have to contend with Miles Boykin, Willie Snead, Chris Moore and fellow 2020 draftee Devin Duvernay for playing time. But I’ll roll the dice with a player who’s collegiate production you simply can’t argue with.
– Matt Barbato (@RealMattBarbato)

Pick 4.06 – Adam Trautman (TE – NO)
Former Dayton TE Adam Trautman was touted as one of the better TE prospects in this class despite coming out of the FCS. The Saints not only drafted Trautman in the third round, but traded up to do so, trading all four of their remaining draft picks. Like most TE prospects, Troutman probably won’t see a ton of opportunities out the gate, so you’ll need to remain patient with him. But if you’re getting him in the fourth round of your rookie drafts, you’re more than likely not getting a player that will produce in Year 1 anyway. With Jared Cook entering the final year of his contract at age 33, Trautman could be in line for the starting TE role in this offense as soon as next season. While Cole Kmet might be the TE1 in this class, Trautman is 1B for me, and being able to get him a full round later is a great value.
– Kyle August (@kyleFFfellas)

Pick 4.07 – Devin Asiasi (TE – NE)
Who am I to tell Bill Belichick that he might have reached on Devin Asiasi when he traded up for the UCLA tight end in the third round? While draft pundits near and far scoffed at the Patriots’ selection here, I’m siding with the front office that consistently finds unheralded talent to fit their scheme. Asiasi walks into a Patriots’ tight end room that is desperate for a difference maker. At 6’3″ and 257 pounds, Asiasi is a slightly bigger, slower version of Aaron Hernandez, demonstrating enormous potential as a “move” tight end at the next level. And just like Hernandez in his heyday with the Patriots, Asiasi isn’t facing much competition for targets out of New England’s wide receivers. Tremendous value here midway through the fourth round.
– Rob Searles (@robbob17)

Pick 4.08 – Quintez Cephus (WR – DET)
Quintez Cephus might be the perfect prospect to target at the end of rookie drafts because of his physical play style; he led the entire draft class with a 66.7% contested catch rate. Cephus saw his draft stock tumble to the fifth round after he ran an abysmal and slow 40-yard dash (4.73) at the Combine. However, Cephus’ Burst Score ranks in the 82nd percentile, making him the type of receiver who wins off the line of scrimmage and makes tough catches over the middle. Anquan Boldin caught 67 balls and 8 touchdowns with a similar skill set in Detroit a few years ago. The Lions can move on from Marvin Jones in a year, and Cephus wins at the catch point in a similar way. There is a productive future in Detroit for Cephus to carve out a WR2 role, and that makes him an incredible value here.
– Paul Ghiglieri (FantasyGhigs)

Pick 4.09 – Dalton Keene (TE – NE)
Going in, I didn’t like much when it comes to the tight ends in this draft class. I knew I’d be intrigues if the Pats took one, but I didn’t expect them to take two. It was very remeniscent of Gronk and Aaron Hernandez. Not saying I expect production like those two gave us back in the day, but I do think Keene is the more complete of the two. For this reason, more playing time than Devin Asiasi and therefore, will see a quicker increase in value if he’s on the field more and getting targets. His combine workout metrics were all above average testing in the 71st percentile or better. His game reminds me of Austin Seferian-Jenkins but with some mustached swag. He shouldn’t be anyone you’re relying on right away, but he could provide dynasty owners solid return on investment if he falls into the endzone a couple times early in the season. On the other hand, he’s also a solid stash on the chance that he develops into a reliable dynasty asset down the road.
– Josh Dalley (@JoshDalley72)

Pick 4.10 – Gabriel Davis (WR – BUF)
In the late fourth round, it’s difficult to find a true alpha wide receiver who has an impressive prospect profile, but that’s what Gabriel Davis offers. A fourth-round pick to the Bills, Davis enters a tough depth chart to climb, and a less-than-desirable passing attack as his reward for climbing it. However, his profile cannot be ignored at this stage in drafts. Davis stands at 6’2″ and 216 pounds with above-average athleticism (most notably a 77th-percentile Speed Score). Davis comes out of UCF, which is no pushover program, and he racked up and 81st-percentile target share (29.1%) and a 65th-percentile Dominator Rating (34.4%) during his junior season, before declaring early. Davis was on the field as a freshman, but truly broke out in his sophomore season, at just over age 19 (80th-percentile Breakout Age). Davis’s age-adjusted production as well as his 17.2 yards per reception mark in 2019 illuminate his upside at the NFL level, and this intriguing of a player is hard to find this deep into rookie drafts.
– Mark Leipold (@LeipoldNFL)

Pick 4.11 – Joe Reed (WR – LAC)
This is a play for the future. Mike Williams has proven he’s not a true alpha and nothing more than a complementary piece. Keenan Allen will be 29 years old after this season and heading into free agency. It’s not entirely out of the realm of possibiliites that the Chargers let him go. Joe Reed has as good of a chance as any fifth round pick to actually make some noise. He also has some talent. Reed has 94th percentile speed and 76th percentile burst. There’s explosiveness to his game. He will have a couple highlight plays as a rookie in limited action. Perhaps that’s enough to earn a bigger role as a sophomore.
– Jason Katz (@jasonkatz13)

Pick 4.12 – DeeJay Dallas (RB – SEA)
It appears that many of my colleagues have also soured on DeeJay Dallas’ dynasty upside due to the addition of Carlos Hyde. Having two running backs on the roster who ran for over 1,000 rushing yards last season is not an ideal situation, but there is every reason to believe that Dallas has a strong chance at emerging as the team’s third down back. A former wide receiver who excels in pass protection, the Seahawks may give Dallas more snaps than expected as they look to avoid tipping their hand based on personnel. An explosive runner with an every down skill set, Dallas landed on a team with significant talent in front of him, but none with particularly bright dynasty futures. Dallas has the talent to carve out a significant role in the Seahawks backfield, or at the very least replace what Seattle hoped they were getting when they drafted Rashaad Penny in the first round of the 2018 NFL Draft. Dallas has a RB2/RB3 skill set, but may be more of a bye week filler type until he earns enough snaps to become a consistent fantasy contributor. Landing Dallas at 4.12 would have been near impossible before the Hyde signing. However, the fact that Hyde signed a one year deal suggests that Dallas can still earn the role that had him being drafted in the third round in early May rookie drafts.
– Raju Byfield (fantasycontext)

Pick 5.01 – Brycen Hopkins (TE – LAR)
Through countless rookie drafts and startups including rookies, Brycen Hopkins is my most rostered rookie at this point in the offseason. Hopkins is most likely going to be one of those players that will have limited opportunities early in his career and will take some time to develop. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Despite the contract extension given to Tyler Higbee, Gerald Everett is on the last year of his current deal. With the possibility of the Rams moving on from Everett at the end of 2020, it opens up an opportunity for Hopkins to make an impact in 2021 with the Rams transitioning to more 12 personnel towards the end of 2019. At his current price, Brycen Hopkins is a risk-free option in the 5th round of rookie drafts.
– John Bauer (@TheBauerClub)

Pick 5.02 – Isaiah Coulter (WR – HOU)
Isaiah Coulter is not a known commodity by any means, but the Texans’ fifth round pick could end up becoming a sneaky dynasty asset should he get the opportunity. Coulter is an outside wide receiver out of the University of Rhode Island who has 4.61 speed and an impressive catch radius. He may not have much opportunity right away in this offense, but the veterans ahead are no surefire bets to stay healthy in 2020. Will Fuller, Kenny Stills, Brandin Cooks, Randall Cobb, and Keke Coutee all missed time last season, and their injury history suggests there may be more of a revolving door at the wide receiver position than we think. I’ll take the gamble on a potential red zone weapon for Deshaun Watson and leave Coulter to develop on my taxi squad for a season.
– Dan Ambrosino (@AmbrosinoNFL)

Pick 5.03 – Collin Johnson (WR – JAC)
My final draft pick was another shot in the dark at wide receiver, selecting Collin Johnson out of Texas. With how deep this wide receiver class is, I’d be happy to load up on wide receivers this year and focus on other positions next year or through trades. Johnson was the second receiver drafted by the Jacksonville Jaguars (the first being Laviska Shenault in the second round), so he won’t see nearly as much hype. A couple years ago he was being considered as an early-round prospect, but a hamstring injury plagued him during his senior season, causing him to fall to the fifth round. Though he’s currently stuck behind D.J. Chark, Dede Westbrook, Shenault, and others on the depth chart, the Jaguars will likely be forced to throw the ball a lot so he could see playing time if they’re chasing points and need extra weapons on the field.
– Sam Hoppen (@SamHoppen)

Pick 5.04 – K.J. Hill (WR – LAC)
Finishing out my draft, I felt like it was only right to take a sleeper like K.J. Hill. A consistent player to finish off a consistent draft, Hill broke school-records at Ohio State but still fell to the seventh round of the NFL Draft. Hill had a school-record 201 receptions in his career and tied a program-record of 48-straight games of at least one reception. Hill will have to beat out Andre Patton and fifth-round draft pick Joe Reed for slot opportunities as a rookie with the Chargers. He had the second-highest percentage of open targets on plays of five yards or in (58.5%) as a senior and posted a catch rate of 75% or higher in all four seasons at Ohio State. Keenan Allen is in the final year of his contract and played the first full 16-game season of his career at 28-years-old. Hill could also be in for a larger role in 2021 considering the Chargers exercised the fifth and final year of Mike Williams‘ contract this offseason as well.
– Vaughn Dalzell (@VaughnDalzell)

Pick 5.05 – Thaddeus Moss (TE – WAS)
Why not take a shot on Randy Moss’ son with my final pick? Thaddeus Moss certainly has the pedigree and put up some decent numbers last season with LSU, catching 47 balls for 570 yards and four touchdowns. Moss isn’t the most impressive athlete, which is part of the reason why he went undrafted. However, his reliable hands, outstanding instincts and impressive blocking ability give him a chance to see the field more often that his draft status would suggest. Plus, Washington has virutally nothing at the tight end position. Jeremy Sprinkle, the incumbent if we can call him that, has only 33 catches in three seasons. Behind him are Richard Rogers and Logan Thomas. While it might be a long shot that Moss sees significant playing time, it’s not inconceivable. And at this point in the draft, I’m willing to take a shot on a deep sleeper with great genes at a really thin position.
– Matt Barbato (@RealMattBarbato)

Pick 5.06 – Michael Warren II (RB – PHI)
It’s Round 5, so clearly anyone you take here is a dart throw that might even be cut from your roster before the season starts. However, if you’re going to throw a dart, Michael Warren II out of Cincinnati isn’t a bad player to take a chance on. Yes, he was undrafted following this year’s Draft, but after signing with the Eagles, Philadelphia is still yet to add another RB to the roster. So in the final round of your draft, at worst you could be looking at Mile Sanders’ handcuff. If (or maybe when) the Eagles add another RB, Warren’s value takes a pretty big hit, but for now, he’s a fine scratch-off ticket here in Round 5.
– Kyle August (@kyleFFfellas)

Pick 5.07 – Salvon Ahmed (RB – SF)
Who can generate close to 1,000 scrimmage yards from two different undrafted free agent running backs in consecutive years? Kyle Shanahan, that’s who. With UDFAs Matt Breida and Raheem Mostert providing the flavor of the week for the 49ers rushing attack over the past two years, general manager John Lynch decided against investing draft capital at the running back position. Instead, Lynch cleared the way for Mostert to lead this backfield by unloading Matt Breida to the Miami Dolphins for a 5th round pick. If you take a look at San Francisco’s current backfield; you’ll find a 28 year old in Mostert who has never demonstrated an ability to handle a serious workload, a wildly inefficient Tevin Coleman, a once-promising back who has yet to play a single down since signing with San Francisco in March of 2018, and a third-year pro who played 60 snaps last season. You can go ahead and bet your bottom dollar that I’ll happily spend a late round dart throw on another UDFA running back for Shanahan to bring international prominence.
– Rob Searles (@robbob17)

Pick 5.08 – Jake Fromm (QB – BUF)
If this wasn’t a 2QB league, Fromm wouldn’t be the pick here, even this late. However, in this format, quarterbacks are vital assets, and you should always keep the cupboard stocked. Nick Foles didn’t have much value until suddenly he did. The same could be said for Gardner Minshew. Fromm is arguably the most pro-ready QB in this class, and the incumbent he will back up is an erratic and inaccurate thrower whose value is tied to his legs. Should Josh Allen suffer an injury, or if his inconsistency never gets resolved, then Fromm is the type of prospect who could eventually steal the job based on his intangibles and ability to execute the offensive scheme competently, if not spectacularly. Fromm makes intelligent reads and smart decisions, something Allen doesn’t always do. Fromm does lack athleticism and doesn’t have a big arm, but he inherits a team with receivers who possess route running savvy and speed. Moreover, the Bills are a run-first team, so they would never expect Fromm to carry the team with his arm. He reminds me of Chad Pennington, which means QB2 upside is within reach under the right circumstances.
– Paul Ghiglieri (FantasyGhigs)

Pick 5.09 – Jason Huntley (RB – DET)
Huntley has been productive since his Sophmore season at New Mexico when he broke out with 6.1 YPC. Huntley reminds me of quicker Dion Lewis. From a physical tools standpoint, his speed and burst scores are very impressive. He hauled in an impressive 126 receptions over his final three seasons, provinjg he has the hands to be productive in today’s NFL. I think the Lions drafted him not only for depth and special teams contributions, but also to potentially be the player they thought they were getting in Ty Johnson last year. Johnson proved to be dissapointing and Huntley could be one of those players that sees a rise up Detroit’s depth chart this time next year. If Kerryon Johnson can’t stay healthy for a third sttraight season, it’s almost a given that Huntley would be the backup for the Lions in 2021. Let’s face it, if you’re looking for a starter this late in a rookie draft, that’s like the old needle in a haystack…good luck. He’s a low-risk buy this late but could see his value boosted after sitting on your bench in 2020.
– Josh Dalley (@JoshDalley72)

Pick 5.10 – Marquez Callaway (WR – NO)
It’s surprising that Marquez Callaway went undrafted, and that makes his path to the field all the more murky, but his profile is impressive. Though he did attend Tennessee for four years, he came in young and broke out as a sophomore at age 19.4, which is well above average. Callaway’s counting stats don’t jump off the page by any means, but because Tennessee was a relatively anemic passing attack, his market share numbers are solid enough (22.2% Target Share in 2018, 33.1% Dominator Rating in 2019). Callaway’s 19.0 yards per catch posts him in the 90th-percentile of college wideouts entering the NFL, and suggests that his play style would be a nice complement to Michael Thomas if he can climb the depth chart. Callaway posted just above average speed and 83rd-percentile burst with no agility testing data, but that’s definitely adequate. Though the Saints are generally loaded on offense, outside of their top three wideouts (Michael Thomas, Emmanuel Sanders, and Tre’Quan Smith) there are no established players, meaning that Callaway could find himself an injury away from the field as soon as 2020 if things break right for him. Note: Normally, I’d take James Robinson if this were a real draft, but I did that in the 1QB mock draft, so I wanted to also write up Callaway here.
– Mark Leipold (@LeipoldNFL)

Pick 5.11 – JaMycal Hasty (RB – SF)
The 49ers running back depth chart cosnists of a 28 year old UDFA that broke out at age 27, a 27 year old straight line runner that has failed as a feature back at every opportunity, a 24 year old sub-athlete special teamer, and a guy who hasn’t played football since 2017. JaMycal Hasty has elite 87th percentile burst, average speed, and average ability to catch passes. If any depth chart is climable, it’s this one. I’ll take a shot on that with the second to last pick of a rookie draft.
– Jason Katz (@jasonkatz13)

Pick 5.12 – Albert Okwuegbunam (TE – DEN)
Albert Okwuegbunam is a talented tight end who had the misfortune of landing on the same depth chart as Noah Fant. Drew Lock and Alvert O shared a special connection at Missouri, and Denver is no doubt hoping that they can carry it on in the pros. He is an absolute zero risk flier at this point of the draft. He was going as early as the third round in pre-draft rookie drafts, but the fact that he may max out as a rotational player has really bottomed out his dynasty floor. He has enough talent to emerge as the starter by 2021, especially when his pre-existing rapport with Drew Lock is taken into account, but Fant’s draft capital and talent are likely to keep him in the mix even if Okwuegbunam emerges. Don’t forget about Albert O at the tail end of your rookie drafts.
– Raju Byfield (fantasycontext)

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